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Re: PS3 STOLEN? Follow these steps! Not always a "lost cause"

Jul 22, 2009

Choochie69,

 

 

Respectable link, although it doesn't necessarily help a PS3 user after their device has been stolen. A good reference outside of the chance the PS3's MAC is still stored in your router, would be: at the XMB scroll left to the  option "SETTINGS", than scroll down to the option of "NETWORK SETTINGS", and once in there choose the first option "SETTINGS AND CONNECTION STATUS LIST". From here it is pretty self explanatory, but in case it's not..... scroll down a bit and you'll see the term "MAC" and across from it your actual address.

 

I know it may seem lame to walk it through step by step, but since a loyal thread watcher posted something related, I felt the need to expand on it. Thanks again Choochie69 for the info.

 

 

- Detective C.

PSN- MrBook

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Re: PS3 STOLEN? Follow these steps! Not always a "lost cause"

Jul 22, 2009
My pleaser Mr B, I'm still waiting for Sony to nap the crooks that ripped of my PS3's, an you are a saint for making the effort to asist us that have had their respective consoles stolen
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Re: PS3 STOLEN? Follow these steps! Not always a "lost cause"

Jul 26, 2009
 

MrBook wrote:

HAD YOUR SYSTEM STOLEN? TELL YOUR TALE, AND FEEL FREE TO READ ON.

 

From the Desk of:

Detective C.

Washington, DC

 

I have seen forum or topic or thread (call it what you will) where someone rants on and on about how their PS3 was stolen. Generally you get about 30 random people all opining with their "two cents"..... ten of which pat you on the back and say, "that sucks dude!". Another ten laugh at you or ask idiotic questions like, "how could a PS3 get stolen?", and lastly...ten odd people with graduate degrees (or years of internet surfing) tell you why all your "tracking" theories are bunk! I've worked in law enforcement for the last ten years, and currently hold the "ole mighty title" of detective. Not to say I'm some sort of pampas ace hole, but I'm just at 30 years of age, and I've been gaming since my neighbors got a ColecoVision and I was only four! When someone's hardware goes missing, I go out of my way to cover all possible leads! And these steps below.....it's what I do everytime I get a case involving a missing video game system (outside of local pawnshop checks and checking NCIC for any show of said product).

 

Since this has been posted once or twice, but always deep within another persons initial complaint, I thought it couldn't hurt to try and give this information out in it's own venue. ALthough it should be noted, these steps are only the general guidelines of what should be done post stolen PS3. Prior to it's theft (unfortunately) you should have already been proactive and recorded the serial number and MAC address. As well.....marked your PS3 in a slightly out of the way location, to make it exclusive to you and no one else (ie.- under the memory card reader panel engrave your initials and last 4 digits of your social security number, for example).

 

 

I'll start by laying out some general ground rules, and keep terminology and references to a "general society" level of complexity, as I am not a computer nerd genius, and neither is 90% of PS3 users.

 

It is true, your MAC and IP can be masked, and some routers with NAT will make it ever so difficult to acquire said information, but hear me out, and take my advice, you are not necessarily screwed!!

 

Remember I'm a detective, a gamer, and although I'm not F'n Vic Mackey, I do my best....... 

 

Assuming your PS3 is stolen, do this: 

 

If you know your MAC address and serial number for your PS3, great, and give it to the officer / police dispatcher when filing your initial report. Then sit back, have a smoke, and wait for results!!

 

Guess what?? People get themselves murdered.......banks get themselves robbed........and drug dealers.....they deal drugs, and stab crack addicts!! Basically, the police are busy, and detectives may not be "hot on the trail" of your stolen property in a timely manner based on your years of watching Colombo. So make sure you do the following:

 

1. Find out the officer/detectives name and phone number assigned to your case (there will be one attached to it, despite however many donut crumbs rest upon it).

2. Due to multiple factors (other active investigations, officer being very old and not knowing his nerd like options, etc) you may want to see if these steps are being utilized.....

3. The detective can contact SCEA in Foster City, CA, speak with one of their IT Security officers, who in turn will give them the necessary wording for what they need to see on a search authorization.

4. The search request asks SCEA security to track the MAC address of the property, and label it as "stolen" (relating to an investigation). If the property shows up, the security folk can forward the information attained back to the law enforcement officer. SCEA has the ability to track MAC's, but needs access to an overseas office to run a serial number to get your MAC address (assuming you only know the serial number).

5. The detective in turn types this paperwork up, brings it to the magistrate, and the judge signs off on it (judges do this so often, they don't need a "song and dance" from the officer, just the gist).

6. Now assuming sometime later, said "bad guy" plugs in your PS3, even if only to test his network, Sony will know. In rare occasions the bad guy sells the PS3, and the innocent bystander that purchases it (not knowing it's stolen) not only goes online, but registers it with an email address, home address, credit card, etc. All of this information is available to law enforcement personnel.

7. Sooner or later (even if it's a few months down the road) your stolen PS3 will more then likely jump online. When this happens, Sony gets whatever information they can, even if it's just an IP address and starts investigating. If it's just the IP, they also get what general area the IP came from, and what service is providing the internet to the dwelling in question.

8. The officer then takes that info, draws up another search authorization for whatever internet provider service, and requests the physical address of where the IP originated from. From there it's simply a matter of them showing up with a search warrant for the location, and finding the PS3. The person inside might have no idea (innocent guy having purchased it from Craiglist) or may in fact be the suspect himself. A lot of times detectives will go this route, because not only are they finding your property......but chances are they will stumble across even more stolen property, or some other type of criminal activity.

 

In the end, it is possible that you didn't think any of this would/could be possible, but it is. It's possible that Sony will never get any hits on your PS3, and you will never hear a thing. It's possible your local law enforcement is unaware that Sony has this capability.......who knows. All I know is it's an avenue that can be traveled, and if the officer in question is not taking this path, or you have suggested this path, then it's that police officers sworn duty to execute these options. My heart goes out to all PS3 or video game system owners who never recovered their property, and who feel their case was "blown off". I speak from experience, both as a victim of theft, and as an officer investigating thefts.......it takes two people to work an effective case. Both the officer investigating, and the victim relaying information / following up on their case.

 

I'm sure the net-techs out there will say I'm full of BS, or try and find "flaws" in my simplified explanations, but it's all true. I've witnessed it first hand, and followed these same guide lines......oh, and I got some people back their PS3's. The security officers at SCEA are brilliant, and I dare anyone to intelligently justify why they're not!!......because they are...... so there!!

 

 

UPDATED WITH BELOW LISTED INFORMATION

 

This was brought up during another thread and again in an email I received........ 

 

If you didn't make a note of your PS3 / PSP serial number or MAC address, here are two tips: 

 

1. If you registered it with the Playstation network, SCEA has a copy, and this can be obtained.

 

2. Check your routers settings, and depending on how you have it setup, you can retrieve your MAC address from one of it's menus, or within a saved ".txt" file stored on your PC. (although this varies depending on your router, the setup, etc) 

 

Although these may not help everyone, anything that can bring you closer to the recovery of your stolen / lost property is always a good thing! Start with this:

 

 

 If you registered your PS3 with SCEA (generally done under account settings and by connecting through the PSN via the XMB), then SCEA would have a copy of your serial number. You can orchestrate this through customer service, and won't take any longer then the infinite amount of time they have you "on hold". If you did not register your PS3 with SCEA (Sony), and you are certain you do not have the serial number (the original box, written down somewhere, the receipt from store where purchased, etc), then you can try one of the following methods: Much like one of the random emails or posts in the middle, I have somewhat addressed this, but here goes: if I lost/had stolen my PS3 right now, and unfortunately did not copy the serial number or MAC address down, I could do one of the following actions to potentially recover it (keeping in mind the serial number is great for law enforcement tracking purposes, but the MAC address is needed for SCEA tracking purposes):  

 

1. Depending on where purchased, the receipt would have a serial number (either paper in-store copy or digital online copy) 

 

2. If you don't have the receipt, contact the loss prevention/security section of said store (Target, Wal-mart, Best Buy, etc). If the purchase was conducted in the last 30-90 days (depending on the store) they can "pull" your receipt from their database, and print you a copy. If the time frame is longer, that same department can contact their corporate loss prevention and that division can pull the receipt. 

 

3. SCEA, through an affidavit, can match your "known" serial number to the MAC address (which is what they need), but the opposite is also possible. 

 

4. In the vein of thinking of #3....... have your friend check their router settings to see if the MAC address is locked into the device (ie- if you gave it a static IP, any special permissions, etc). 

 

5. Depending on how your home internet is connected and device usage, your internet service provider might also have your MAC address on file, as an authorized accessible device. 

 

6. If the device was registered with SCEA via the PSN, either the serial number or MAC address is on SCEA's files (I forget which one).  In regards to you having some of your friend’s information on your system since you're "friends".......... it is possible, but far beyond my skill set. As in; I'm sure it's in some text file somewhere within the Sony files (which are virtually under lock and key), but alas I do not believe you will or would be able to access such information. Sorry.

 

 

 

 

Side Note: I will try and check this regularly if anyone has any questions or feel free to email me at. Naturally if you send some BS my way via email, you will be blocked post haste!

Message Edited by MrBook on 06-15-2009 11:26 AM
Message Edited by MrBook on 06-15-2009 11:27 AM
Message Edited by MrBook on 06-15-2009 11:27 AM

    

So I need to copy the serial number, IP Address, and Mac Address? If this does happen how do I let the officer assigned to it contact Sony's security officers?


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Re: PS3 STOLEN? Follow these steps! Not always a "lost cause"

Jul 26, 2009
Kudos!
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Re: PS3 STOLEN? Follow these steps! Not always a "lost cause"

Jul 27, 2009

Just recovered my console thanks to MrBooks input but the dang thing woin't turn on, to but a blank screen

 

Any thouughts?

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Re: PS3 STOLEN? Follow these steps! Not always a "lost cause"

Jul 27, 2009
finally figured it out on resetting the console to default setting, all is good now
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razelnuts_XD and Choochie!! responding late, sry

Jul 27, 2009

razelnuts_XD,

 

 

Bottom line, you only need the serial number of your PS3 for law enforcement. That alone gets it a one way ticket into the NCIC database, which is nationally tracked by police, and associated with your filed report. But if your assigned investigator/detective contacts SCEA through their "specialized section", than the MAC address can be recovered based on the serial number (it's just an extra step). Now if you only have the MAC address, than your still good. Your detective can contact SCEA, and they in turn can monitor any traffic associated with that MAC address (ie- credit cards, registration info, and local IP number). You don't need your IP address, as it is specific to you. It's a good piece of information to provide police, as in: if they recover your PS3, and need additional means of identifying it, and the last IP address in the network settings is the one you provided. Other than that it sounds like you are on the right path. Your assigned case investigator can contact SCEA, and get the information he/she needs to conduct all the above mentioned steps. If for some reason they are unaware (in your opinion), and they do not mind the additional assistance of an outside law enforcement officer, you can PM me your case number and detectives contact information. Once I verify it,I can send them the direct (not public record) contact info for my contacts within SCEA monitoring and security section. Good luck sir!!!

 

 

Also.... Choochie..... congrats!! I'm glad to hear of the recovery! Did the police depict the recovery process at all?? Did it sound like a scene straight out of Lethal Weapon?? (kidding of course) I'm sure everyone who's following the thread, or poking in wouldn't mind a brief "tell of tales". Again, congrats on the return of some much needed property! So do you have two now??

 

 

- Detective C.

aka - MrBook

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Re: razelnuts_XD and Choochie!! responding late, sry

Jul 27, 2009

MrBook wrote:

razelnuts_XD,

 

 

Bottom line, you only need the serial number of your PS3 for law enforcement. That alone gets it a one way ticket into the NCIC database, which is nationally tracked by police, and associated with your filed report. But if your assigned investigator/detective contacts SCEA through their "specialized section", than the MAC address can be recovered based on the serial number (it's just an extra step). Now if you only have the MAC address, than your still good. Your detective can contact SCEA, and they in turn can monitor any traffic associated with that MAC address (ie- credit cards, registration info, and local IP number). You don't need your IP address, as it is specific to you. It's a good piece of information to provide police, as in: if they recover your PS3, and need additional means of identifying it, and the last IP address in the network settings is the one you provided. Other than that it sounds like you are on the right path. Your assigned case investigator can contact SCEA, and get the information he/she needs to conduct all the above mentioned steps. If for some reason they are unaware (in your opinion), and they do not mind the additional assistance of an outside law enforcement officer, you can PM me your case number and detectives contact information. Once I verify it,I can send them the direct (not public record) contact info for my contacts within SCEA monitoring and security section. Good luck sir!!!

 

 

Also.... Choochie..... congrats!! I'm glad to hear of the recovery! Did the police depict the recovery process at all?? Did it sound like a scene straight out of Lethal Weapon?? (kidding of course) I'm sure everyone who's following the thread, or poking in wouldn't mind a brief "tell of tales". Again, congrats on the return of some much needed property! So do you have two now??

 

 

- Detective C.

aka - MrBook


 

          Ok thanks I live in an area where it's quiet but there are a lot of people that look like deliquents and shady charaters i'll be sure to try this.

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completely understandable

Jul 28, 2009

Razelnuts_XD,

 

 

 

I completely misunderstand the "small town USA" concept, and "feel" for your loss. On a brighter side, the police department there will more than likely be overall involved, and more susceptible to suggestion (in case they are unaware of SCEA's capabilities). Hopefully the suspect list is short, and due to the size of your town...... hopefully the number of wrongdoer's involved compares to that of a campy Batman episode (Adam West style).Twas a horrible reference, I know, but it made me recall the types of inept crimes Batman's villains performed on the old 60's variation. Well, it's late...... good luck sir!

 

 

- Detective C.

aka - MrBook

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Re: completely understandable

Jul 31, 2009

The perp has logged on with my console am Sony nabbed their IP address an informed the local police...

 

Figured I'd have to wait until the thief had gone to trial to get my console back but such was not the case

 

He had somehow purchase $75.00 orth of game, an Sony was kind enough to refund that monies to my account

 

Due to you support MrBook I was able to get my PS3 back, slightly damaged

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