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Lombax Warrior
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013
Peakvox is Japanese. that's it. so it's biased to Japan. Cat Happy 日本でお会いしましょう!
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Sackboy
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013

Project_Denise wrote:
Peakvox is Japanese. that's it. so it's biased to Japan. Cat Happy 日本でお会いしましょう!

 Indeed and as it should be!! IMO they should of kept it a JP only space as it is, but that's just me as I prefer JP over any other region, so I guess that makes me biased as well LOL...


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Treasure Hunter
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013

U2crazy4me wrote:

Project_Denise wrote:
Peakvox is Japanese. that's it. so it's biased to Japan. Cat Happy 日本でお会いしましょう!

 Indeed and as it should be!! IMO they should of kept it a JP only space as it is, but that's just me as I prefer JP over any other region, so I guess that makes me biased as well LOL...


Do you think the same about Granzella too?

It was originally started in Japan, before even reaching our servers here.

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Uncharted Territory
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Re: NOT COOL O-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013
Well looky here at who is backpedaling cause they got busted. I never claimed it was the first but it was a helluva a lot more accurate than on your original statement of saying Japan invented video games.
TRANS-UNITY SUPPORTING TRUE TRANSGENDER GAMERS ON ALL PLATFORMS
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Ghost of Sparta
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Re: NOT COOL O-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013

Most of you should read this

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_localization

 

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First Son
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013

Kitty_Pyra wrote:

Thought some clarification would be helpful here to straighten out some facts.

 

1951: Nim

A drawing of the NIMROD computer.

On May 5, 1951, the NIMROD computer, created by Ferranti, was presented at the Festival of Britain. Using a panel of lights for its display, it was designed exclusively to play the game of Nim; this was the first instance of a digital computer designed specifically to play a game. This machine was based on an original design built by E.U. Condon in 1941, after having acquired a patent in 1940. The machine weighed over a ton, and a duplicate was displayed at the New York World's Fair] NIMROD could play either the traditional or "reverse" form of the game.

 

As for the what is considered the first digital game Nim:

 

"Variants of Nim have been played since ancient times. The game is said to have originated in China (it closely resembles the Chinese game of "Jianshizi", or "picking stones"), but the origin is uncertain;"

 

 


Please don't blatantly copy & paste from Wikipedia when you don't know what you're talking about.

 

Nim is an ancient strategy game that most mathematicians and game enthusiasts are familiar with. This machine was named Nimrod, not Nim or NIMROD (acronym).

 

E.U. Condon designed the Nimatron for Westinghouse in 1939. It was displayed in their pavilion at the New York World's Fair in 1940.

 

In 1950, John Bennett of Ferranti Australia designed a digital computer which played nim, based on Condon's analog Nimatron. Another [British] Ferranti engineer, Raymond Stuart-Williams, oversaw the building of the machine. It went on display in 1951 toward the end of the Festival of Britain (a year long event), but it was more popular at the Berlin Industrial Show. A replica is on display at Berlin's Computerspielemuseum.

 

 

 

 

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First Son
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

[ Edited ]
May 23, 2013

U2crazy4me wrote:

Vox_Rationis wrote:

U2crazy4me wrote:


 Not Sure why this is any kind of surprise, seeing that gaming and the gaming industry is a Japan invention..


Completely wrong.

 

Multiplayer board games go back to the ancient Egyptians (senet).

The first digital game, Nimrod, was built by a British company in 1951. It was based on the design of an American nuclear physicist.

 

The first coin-op video game, Galaxy Game, was built by two Stanford grads in 1971.

 

The first video game console, the Magnavox Odyssey, was released in 1972. It was designed by Ralph Baer, who is considered the father of video games.

 

SEGA was originally formed as a merger of two American companies. Nintendo's first foray into the game console market was reselling the Magnavox Odyssey. Excluding their Laser Clay alleys, Japanese video games were essentially nonexistent until 1973 when Taito released Davis Cup and Soccer. The West's exposure to Japanese games wasn't until the mid to late 70s: Speed Race (1974), Gun Fight (1975), and Space Invaders (1978).

 


 

 First off, how you come up with a board game makes me totally laugh out loud.. Wasn't even referring to board games, Gaming in this day and age is in case you didn't know is a short term for Video gaming not board games. Not to mention there is No actual definitive proof that the Egyptians were the first to do so LMAO..


I never claimed Egyptians were the first to do so, only that we have evidence of multiplayer board games existing as far back as 3500 B.C. (technically prehistoric Egypt). No games excavated from Japan date back this far.

 

Gaming, refers to casinos. Video games are part of the interactive entertainment industry, which includes computers, consoles, handhelds, pinball tables, and arcade games.

 


U2crazy4me wrote:



 Now I will say that I honestly did totally forget about the Magnavox Odyssey, its been so long I had a bit of a mind laps there.. The Nimrod technically doesn't count and I'm not really about to go into the reasons why only to say that it really never had any impact on the gaming scene or market, was actually like typical British engineering a complete fail..



There's no way you're old enough to have played an Odyssey. You're obviously a confused kid who misspoke, was thoroughly corrected, and now refuses to admit he was wrong.

Once again, Nimrod was designed as an exhibit for the Festival of Britain. Digital games didn't exist up until this point. It was far ahead of its time, which is why a replica is on permanent display at Berlin's Computerspielemuseum.

 

Instead of arguing with me by using poorly researched articles on the Web, please learn how to spell:

 

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lapse

 


U2crazy4me wrote:


 And to correct your statement of the first coin-op, not sure where you came up with that info but it is widely and factually known that the first ever coin-op is what is most often mistakenly believed to be the first console, Pong... Not Galaxy Game. Here's a source for you incase you want to dispute it and a quick quote from the first paragraph

 

http://classicgaming.gamespy.com/View.php?view=ConsoleMuseum.Detail&id=3&game=12

 

"Pong, while not the first videogame, was the first coin-op arcade game and the first mainstream videogame that was available to almost everyone. Pong was the impetus for the development of the videogaming industry, almost single-handedly creating both the home and the arcade videogame markets."


In September of 1971, Galaxy Game became the first video game that accepted coins:

http://infolab.stanford.edu/pub/voy/museum/galaxy.html

 

Two months later, Nutting Associates released Computer Space, which was the first mass-produced video game (1,500 units). One was used as a prop in Soylent Green:

 

 

 

Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney (who had sold Computer Space to Nutting Associates) founded Atari in 1972. The first Pong unit was placed in Andy Capp's Tavern in Sunnyvale that September, a full year after Galaxy Game debuted at Stanford.

 


U2crazy4me wrote:

 Also too you might what to read up on Nintendo while your there cause I don't know where you came up with that info either. Nintendo only got into the video game market in the 80's long after the Odyssey was out of sight cause the Odyssey was a flop in its own right. And Nintendo had been around since 1889, not in video games of course, but it was still around as a company making card games.


Wrong again.

 

Nintendo (partnered with Sony) pioneered the use of optoelectronics in the toy market when they began manufacturing Beam Gun games in 1969. I already mentioned their Laser Clay Shooting Galleries, which were also popular in the early 70s.

 

Nintendo entered the video game market in 1974 when they secured the rights to distribute the Odyssey in Japan. Nintendo began developing its own hardware and released five Color TV consoles prior to the Famicom, the first of which debuted in 1977.

 

http://www.nindb.net/system/color-tv-game/index.html

 


U2crazy4me wrote:

Edit: I forgot to mention that I did misrepresent my original statement, It was suppose to state that Japan invited the gaming industry AS WE KNOW IT, not that they were the sole inventors of it.. The company's that came before it were the ones that were responsible for the gaming crash, after that the Japanese market swept in and brought it back to life and showed the others how the business should of been done, took over from there and never looked back..


LOL! Japan invited the gaming industry? Nice try, kid!

 

For every Nintendo and Konami there was an Atari and Midway. No one company has been responsible for the ebb and flow of the video game industry, and there's been more than one "gaming crash." The first happened in 1977 due to the flood of Pong units on the market.

 

In the future, simply admit you have no idea what you're talking about instead of digging a deeper hole.

 

 

 

 

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Treasure Hunter
Registered: 10/01/2009
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013

U2crazy4me wrote:

Vox_Rationis wrote:

What a bunch of babies. Develop some patience--and buy Peakvox content. The more cheapskates there are, the less incentive O-Two has to port the content.

 


U2crazy4me wrote:


 Not Sure why this is any kind of surprise, seeing that gaming and the gaming industry is a Japan invention..


Completely wrong.

 

Multiplayer board games go back to the ancient Egyptians (senet).

The first digital game, Nimrod, was built by a British company in 1951. It was based on the design of an American nuclear physicist.

 

The first coin-op video game, Galaxy Game, was built by two Stanford grads in 1971.

 

The first video game console, the Magnavox Odyssey, was released in 1972. It was designed by Ralph Baer, who is considered the father of video games.

 

SEGA was originally formed as a merger of two American companies. Nintendo's first foray into the game console market was reselling the Magnavox Odyssey. Excluding their Laser Clay alleys, Japanese video games were essentially nonexistent until 1973 when Taito released Davis Cup and Soccer. The West's exposure to Japanese games wasn't until the mid to late 70s: Speed Race (1974), Gun Fight (1975), and Space Invaders (1978).

 


 

 First off, how you come up with a board game makes me totally laugh out loud.. Wasn't even referring to board games, Gaming in this day and age is in case you didn't know is a short term for Video gaming not board games. Not to mention there is No actual definitive proof that the Egyptians were the first to do so LMAO..

 

 Now I will say that I honestly did totally forget about the Magnavox Odyssey, its been so long I had a bit of a mind laps there.. The Nimrod technically doesn't count and I'm not really about to go into the reasons why only to say that it really never had any impact on the gaming scene or market, was actually like typical British engineering a complete fail..

 

 And to correct your statement of the first coin-op, not sure where you came up with that info but it is widely and factually known that the first ever coin-op is what is most often mistakenly believed to be the first console, Pong... Not Galaxy Game. Here's a source for you incase you want to dispute it and a quick quote from the first paragraph

 

http://classicgaming.gamespy.com/View.php?view=ConsoleMuseum.Detail&id=3&game=12

 

"Pong, while not the first videogame, was the first coin-op arcade game and the first mainstream videogame that was available to almost everyone. Pong was the impetus for the development of the videogaming industry, almost single-handedly creating both the home and the arcade videogame markets."

 

 Also too you might what to read up on Nintendo while your there cause I don't know where you came up with that info either. Nintendo only got into the video game market in the 80's long after the Odyssey was out of sight cause the Odyssey was a flop in its own right. And Nintendo had been around since 1889, not in video games of course, but it was still around as a company making card games.

 

Edit: I forgot to mention that I did misrepresent my original statement, It was suppose to state that Japan invited the gaming industry AS WE KNOW IT, not that they were the sole inventors of it.. The company's that came before it were the ones that were responsible for the gaming crash, after that the Japanese market swept in and brought it back to life and showed the others how the business should of been done, took over from there and never looked back..


As someone who lived through this history, I cannot begin to tell you how wrong this information is. Please stop believing what you read on Wikipedia.

 

You might be familiar with companies like Atari and Activision. They built the video game industry "as we know it." Atari provided the business model for companies like Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft to follow. Activision was the world's first third-party developer (maybe Apollo Games beat them to the punch by a month).

 

The crash was caused by several factors:

 

1. Too much product on the market, especially too much shovelware (See recent Wii history)

2. Corporate conglomerates buying up video game companies in search of a fast buck and then dumping them when they didn't achieve 500% year-over-year growth (Hello, CBS, Quaker Oats and Warner Bros.)

3. The rise of the personal computer (Heard of Apple?)

4. Price drops on CD players that made the technology affordable

5. Affordable VCRs and the rise of the video rental store

 

Gaming stopped being cool because there were other things to do, for less money.  The best games would be on the Apple and the Commodore 64 for the next five years.

 

 

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Ghost of Sparta
Registered: 05/27/2009
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Re: NOT COOL Q-TWO, NOT COOL !!

May 23, 2013

OMG VOX YOUR TOO SMART MAKE THIS THREAD GO OFF-TOPIC

 

okay...my turn

 

"The history of video games goes as far back as the 1940s, when in 1947 Thomas T. Goldsmith, Jr. and Estle Ray Mann filed a United States patent request for an invention they described as a "cathode ray tube amusement device." Video gaming would not reach mainstream popularity until the 1970s and 1980s, when arcade video games, gaming consoles and home computer games were introduced to the general public. Since then, video gaming has become a popular form of entertainment and a part of modern culture in most parts of the world. There are currently considered to be eight generations of video game consoles, with the seventh and the eighth concurrently ongoing." -Wikipedia

 

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