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Wastelander
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Re: red flashing screen on 1'st gen ps3

[ Edited ]
Aug 24, 2013

If sony is unable to help out your situation; then you could still either look for a local shop that does repairs or even attempt to repair the console yourself. The issuse is almost definatily the GPU, but it may not be fried. The best chance to get it working would probably be having a full reflow done. If you are familiar with this type of thing; or even opening up and working with sensitive equipment, and you own or have access to a heat gun, then you can easily find tutorials on disassembly, performing the reflow, and then reassembly by searching google or youtube. It is actually not as difficult as one might think as long as you are EXTREMELLY carefull once inside the unit. Hope you get it going. Sorry about your issues and good luck...

 

If there is no hope for your fat PS3 there is still value in the non working consoles. You can list it on ebay and almost always find buyers even on non working/parts only units sold "as is". You might be able to get at least some of your money back by doing this...

"When you look in the mirror, what do you see? Do you see the real you, or what you have been conditioned to believe is you? The two are so, so different. One is an infinite consciousness capable of being and creating whatever it chooses, the other is an illusion imprisoned by its own perceived and programmed limitations."
David Icke
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Wastelander
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Re: red flashing screen on 1'st gen ps3

[ Edited ]
Aug 26, 2013

You might be able to use this as well; originally found here: How to fix PS3 Update 4.00

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"When you look in the mirror, what do you see? Do you see the real you, or what you have been conditioned to believe is you? The two are so, so different. One is an infinite consciousness capable of being and creating whatever it chooses, the other is an illusion imprisoned by its own perceived and programmed limitations."
David Icke
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Wastelander
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Re: red flashing screen on 1'st gen ps3

Aug 26, 2013

kentdhacker wrote:

So I just bought a first gen ps3 from a co-worker. **bleep** was iffy from the get go but I installed the newst updates and since then I get nothing but a flashing red screen? what the **bleep** is this? Honestly I have no clue what to do . Is the console shot? Can this be fixed? If so would it be cheap or did I just get bf'd?. Someone point me in the right direction. Thanks.


The only realistic way of actually repairing your console is with either a reflow (easiest) or a full rework/reball (much more difficult; but also more likely to fix your console).

 

Reballing Involves dismantling, heating the chip until it can be removed from the board, typically with a hot-air gun and vacuum pickup tool, removing the device, removing solder remaining on the device and board, putting new solder balls in place, replacing the original device if there was a poor connection, or using a new one, and heating the device or board to solder it in place.

Rework (or re-work) is the term for the refinishing operation or repair of an electronic printed circuit board (PCB) assembly, usually involving desoldering and re-soldering of surface-mounted electronic components (SMD). Mass processing techniques are not applicable to single device repair or replacement, and specialized manual techniques by expert personnel using appropriate equipment are required to replace defective components; area array packages such as ball grid array (BGA) devices particularly require expertise and appropriate tools. A hot air gun or hot air station is used to heat devices and melt solder, and specialized tools are used to pick up and position often tiny components.

Reasons for rework of electronics include:

  • Poor solder joints due to faulty assembly or thermal cycling.
  • Solder bridges—unwanted drops of solder that connect points that should be isolated from each other.
  • Faulty components.
  • Engineering parts changes, upgrades, etc.

Reflow Soldering is the most common method of attaching surface mount components to a circuit board, although it can also be used for through-hole components by filling the holes with solder paste and inserting the component leads through the paste. Because wave soldering can be simpler and cheaper, reflow is not generally used on pure through-hole boards. When used on boards containing a mix of SMT and TH components, through-hole reflow allows the wave soldering step to be eliminated from the assembly process, potentially reducing assembly costs.

The goal of the reflow process is to melt the solder and heat the adjoining surfaces, without overheating and damaging the electrical components. In the conventional reflow soldering process, there are usually four stages, called "zones", each having a distinct thermal profile: preheatthermal soak (often shortened to just soak), reflow, and cooling.

Reflow solderingg is a process in which a solder paste (a sticky mixture of powdered solder and flux) is used to temporarily attach one or several electrical components to their contact pads, after which the entire assembly is subjected to controlled heat, which melts the solder, permanently connecting the joint. Heating may be accomplished by passing the assembly through a reflow oven or under an infrared lamp or by soldering individual joints with a hot air pencil or a high temp Heat Gun. If you choose to attempt a full or partial reflow please try to follow the following thermal profile to avoid causing addition damage to the sensitive components:

Basic Thermal Profile for Reflow Soldering.jpg

 

Good luck with whatever you decide on; and hopefully you can get some more life from that unit...

"When you look in the mirror, what do you see? Do you see the real you, or what you have been conditioned to believe is you? The two are so, so different. One is an infinite consciousness capable of being and creating whatever it chooses, the other is an illusion imprisoned by its own perceived and programmed limitations."
David Icke
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