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Apr 17 2011
By: pirate2120 Lombax Warrior 169 posts
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Six-axis motion sensing system

8 replies 2010 views Edited Apr 17, 2011

Can someone please better explain how the Six-axis motion sensing system (three-axis gyroscope, three-axis accelerometer) will work. I am bit fuzzy on some of the key details and am wondering if someone can give me extra insight on it. Please... ps I am not very tech savvy, for some reason I feel like tech hates me, but I try

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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 17, 2011

Hey Man hit up this thread and watch and read these links you will get all the NGP info you need that we as posters have found so far until E3. And I my self am not that tech. I have friends who are PC's that keep me informed.

Post ur NGP Link Info

There is a bunch of good info on the NGP as of yet here. Enjoy.

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I Only Post Everything
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 17, 2011

Six axis reffers to the MEMS accelerometer/gyroscope in the NGP and the PS3 PS Move.

A MEMS gyroscope works with "yaw", "roll" and "pitch" movements. The motions are illustrated below,

http://www.findmems.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Gyro-01.gif

The term "six degrees of freedom" usually associated with gyros refers to the MEMS gyrometer's  X, Y, Z in-plane forces and the MEMS accelerometers X, Y, Z real-world plane forces. Combined, these inputs allow for creating the effects seen in NGP games such as Hot Shots Golf,


(Starting @ 1:30. End @ 2:58)

Another example in TPS mode would be Uncharted for the NGP when Nathan Drake swings on a vine and a player uses exaggerated "yaw" movements to swing forward and back.

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 17, 2011

Wakefulness wrote:

Six axis reffers to the MEMS accelerometer/gyroscope in the NGP and the PS3 PS Move.

A MEMS gyroscope works with "yaw", "roll" and "pitch" movements. The motions are illustrated below,

http://www.findmems.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Gyro-01.gif

The term "six degrees of freedom" usually associated with gyros refers to the MEMS gyrometer's  X, Y, Z in-plane forces and the MEMS accelerometers X, Y, Z real-world plane forces. Combined, these inputs allow for creating the effects seen in NGP games such as Hot Shots Golf,

(Starting @ 1:30. End @ 2:58)

Another example in TPS mode would be Uncharted for the NGP when Nathan Drake swings on a vine and a player uses exaggerated "yaw" movements to swing forward and back.

nice man , good illustration

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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 17, 2011

You know I had already had that in my mind just from using the sixaxis in my PS3 controllers.

While it is a sweet ill.....It makes me say to my self that it is just really triaxis being as the roll axis and yaw axis look the same.

Where are the other 3 axis. would they be considered like shaking  or are the 3 axis considered separate when the NGP is laid flat and up right?

learn me wakefulness

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 17, 2011

Thanks everyone, I understand it now!

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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 18, 2011

wake I still need you to learn me on where the other 3 axis come from.... and how the YAW is differnt from the roll axis....

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I Only Post Everything
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 19, 2011

Yeah, I will try and explain.

Gyro-01.jpg

The "yaw" is a movement in which the controls goes away or towards the ground (in the y axis) while circulating left to right in a natural range of degrees the human wrist is capable of. The "roll" is like a barrel roll of the control. The wrist is capable of beyond the 90 degrees above but, the illustration simply shows a modest degree of the barrel roll. The "pitch" is a forward movement (in the Z-axis) which can be combined with the "yaw" movement for something like painting. The "pitch" action combined with the "roll" can act like a karate stance and punch.

These sort of movements are really basic terms for something like the PS Move. The laws of physics behind how the MEMS (gryro-accelerometer) chips work and how that translates into a controller in space is what really matters. The MEMS chips used in the NGP are the same but, the movements may take a different interpretation in it's games. The roll will be more of a flick, the yaw maybe be more of a wiggle (if using two hands) and, the pitch will be limited to short arms length movement in most games due to the difference in ergonomic design the PS3 move and NGP. However, stuff like the 360 degree body turn and the "looking around" in the virtual world of Hot Shots Golf is made possible. Not to mention when someone turns the console parallel to the ground to look at the virtual grass or sky.

So, in that Hot Shots Golf example, the MEMS gyro and accelerometer is being used but, when the device is held like this,

walk_roll_MEMS.jpg

Y = 1G, X = 0G, Z=0G (in MEMS accel.). No exaggerated movement (in MEMS gyro).

A virtual character or camera can walk forward or backward with a "yaw" wiggle or can somersault or backward-roll with "roll" flick of the NGP. The accelerometer would just read some movement in the Z, X axis (and little to no movement in the Y axis) while the gyro would read how the much the console moves, relative to it's movement.

I can only really sum it in this basic analogy,

  • "Yaw" a cubes spins. One face is always north. One face is always south.  
  • "Roll" a cube flips. Once face is always west. One face is always east.

By my logic, a "pitch" would just register a middle ground between the two movements where a cubes two faces register a southwest, northeast movement. There is always a little bit of leeway between the "yaw" and "roll" but, from the reading from the MEMS gyro+accelerometer; a developer can always read which is which and implement those readings into a game. There is a lot more to get into such as how the coriolis acceleration reading in the MEMS gyro (which is an in-plane to out plane driving force tunning fork type of reading) combines with the MEMS accelerometer but, I only can conceptualize really basic stuff. I don't want to get into hard fomulas I don't know or want to solve in great length.  





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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Six-axis motion sensing system

Apr 19, 2011

Wakefulness wrote:

Yeah, I will try and explain.

Gyro-01.jpg


Ok so using the above diagram there is

Yaw Axis (roll clock/counterclockwise - back and forth) +2

Roll Axis (roll clock/counterclockwise - up and down) +2

Pitch Axis (roll clock/counterclockwise - side to side) +2

That makes sixaxis (hey you can say that backwards) and all 3 of these makes for a pretty good amount of movements in order to make some sickening combinations.....I think I get it now

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