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Apr 01 2011
By: jay_bee1010 First Son 12 posts
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PSP Battery Question

4 replies 412 views Edited Apr 1, 2011

I have a 2001 series and had a standard (3.6v, 1200mah) battery. Bought the extended battery about 1.5 years ago for a long airline flight. Haven't used the standard battery since...until today when I decided to try and charge it up. Tried using an old 1001 series system and I swear when I left for work it says it was charging. Got home and unplugged it from the charger and it shut off. Tried to charge it again using the slim system it came with and nothing. No orange light, no info in the system menu regarding battery status or hours left. Is it normal for a battery to go to complete zero like that after a period of non use??

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Big Daddy
Registered: 03/10/2008
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Re: PSP Battery Question

Apr 1, 2011

jay_bee1010 wrote:

I have a 2001 series and had a standard (3.6v, 1200mah) battery. Bought the extended battery about 1.5 years ago for a long airline flight. Haven't used the standard battery since...until today when I decided to try and charge it up. Tried using an old 1001 series system and I swear when I left for work it says it was charging. Got home and unplugged it from the charger and it shut off. Tried to charge it again using the slim system it came with and nothing. No orange light, no info in the system menu regarding battery status or hours left. Is it normal for a battery to go to complete zero like that after a period of non use??

The batteries do not last forever.

And depending where/how you stored it, it could have been effectively ruined.

Batteries like which the PSP uses normally need to be kept in cool, dry places when stored.  And if it was dead when you stored it, that's usually even worse for the battery, I hear.  I think the best scenario is to have them somewhere around 40% charged, and then store them in a very cool, dry area.

I think you'll get many opinions on how much charge it should have when stored, and whether a refrigerator is necessary for storage, but generally they shouldn't be dead and they should be kept cool.

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First Son
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Re: PSP Battery Question

Apr 2, 2011

Solar_Difusion wrote:

jay_bee1010 wrote:

I have a 2001 series and had a standard (3.6v, 1200mah) battery. Bought the extended battery about 1.5 years ago for a long airline flight. Haven't used the standard battery since...until today when I decided to try and charge it up. Tried using an old 1001 series system and I swear when I left for work it says it was charging. Got home and unplugged it from the charger and it shut off. Tried to charge it again using the slim system it came with and nothing. No orange light, no info in the system menu regarding battery status or hours left. Is it normal for a battery to go to complete zero like that after a period of non use??

The batteries do not last forever.

And depending where/how you stored it, it could have been effectively ruined.

Batteries like which the PSP uses normally need to be kept in cool, dry places when stored.  And if it was dead when you stored it, that's usually even worse for the battery, I hear.  I think the best scenario is to have them somewhere around 40% charged, and then store them in a very cool, dry area.

I think you'll get many opinions on how much charge it should have when stored, and whether a refrigerator is necessary for storage, but generally they shouldn't be dead and they should be kept cool.


Thanks - although if anyone has had an experience like a battery completely draining and not being recognized by a psp after not using the battery for an extended period of time I'd still be interested to hear...

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MVP Support
Registered: 09/17/2009
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Re: PSP Battery Question

Apr 3, 2011

It's not unusual, but it is dependent on the type of the battery.  The capacity of the battery is a function of the battery chemistry, and that is influenced by a number of factors including the electrical charge in the battery itself.  Rechargeable batteries are not designed to store power over extended periods of time (that is what disposable batteries are designed to do).  A rechargeable battery will lose power over a period of weeks or months even if it isn't being used.  Temperature will affect the rate, but a rechargeable battery that hasn't been used for 1.5 years will have long since completely run out of power.  Once the battery has no charge at all, the battery chemistry may be altered such that it is no longer possible to charge the battery at all.  The bottom line is that rechargeable batteries need to be charged periodically, or they can cease to function at all. If you have spare rechargeable batteries for your PSP, it is best to rotate between them, rather than "saving" one for use in future years.

GKP
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Treasure Hunter
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Re: PSP Battery Question

Apr 3, 2011

jay_bee1010 wrote:


Thanks - although if anyone has had an experience like a battery completely draining and not being recognized by a psp after not using the battery for an extended period of time I'd still be interested to hear...

Aye, I have the experience. I had an old laptop battery that I left idling for two years. It was stone dead when I tried to charge it up again.

Lithium Ion and Lithium Polymer Batteries are way different from your standard rechargeable batteries. They can be chemically unstable and can explode violently under a variety of conditions. However, a Protection Circuit placed inside a battery pack is intended to just to prevent that from happening.

A Protection Circuit slowly (and I mean very slowly) discharges the Lithium Ion (or Polymer) cell. This is because the circuit constantly measures voltage levels, temperature, and other factors of the battery in order to protect it. Given enough time, the circuit eventually drains the battery to 2.6 - 3V.

At this point, the Protection Circuit goes "Uh-Oh" and cuts the power to the outputs, because any more discharge of the battery will cause an irreversible chemical change to the battery.

However, despite this, the Protection Circuit still continues to drain the battery, continuing to monitor the cell and waiting for charging current.

Eventually, the cell goes to the Point of No Return (less than 2.50V), a level where the voltage is so low, a chemical change happens. This chemical change makes the batteries very unstable and potentially dangerous to recharge.

In response to this, the Protection Circuit permanently disables the battery, by preventing it from being charged or discharged or being recognized at all.

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