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I Only Post Everything
Registered: 12/22/2008
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 7, 2013
The digital only age isn't as close as many people think it is. The only way a digital only marketplace can exist for things like movies and videogames is when the infrastructure of the entire internet around the world is massively overhauled and available at much greater speeds and no bandwidth caps.

The music industry has been able to survive with a digital only marketplace since the file sizes of songs is MUCH lower than the file sizes of videogames and movies. (a few MB compared to 15+ GB). Therefore, music consumers are able to get their music in a very quick timeframe, and are also able to readily convert those music files into other formats to either save on space, or remove DRM if they so choose.

With videogames, that can't be done. Games have to be in a specific format, and are only able to be played on a specific console. There is no cross platform functionality of a videogame. You can't take the game you purchased, put it on another device, and play it without an issue.

There are benefits to digital games, especially for sports games where there really is zero trade-in value once the next year's version comes out. But for so many other games I still don't see the big benefit to digital only distribution. There are just too many negatives. Game being lost from history once the hosting server is shut down, licenses for the digital distribution of games being terminated if the license holder changes hands or simply decides they don't want it being sold anymore (and this can happen if a director of a game has a type of royalty clause in their contract where they get a cut of each game sold, but due to problems that employee has with their management the management decides to cut-off that game. Yes, it's petty, but so are all human beings), inability to redownload your game if your hard drive crashes and for some reason you are suddenly without internet, the inability to purchase games at all if you are without internet, no used game sales (again, if you have no internet then any type of used game policy is moot).

Those of us who live in technologically advanced countries may not understand that high speed internet isn't available worldwide. Yet, there are still SUBSTANTIAL game/console sales outside of the "broadband world". To lose that customer base permanently would be a financial disaster for the industry.

Hence why I believe that the digital only age for videogames, and for movies, is a LOT further away than so many people think it is.
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Last Guardian
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

[ Edited ]
Jul 7, 2013

I have most of my games converted to digital copies on ps3. With ps+ and also games on sale for $5 or $10 I've snagged quite a few, needing a 1TB hard drive.

 

You don't worry about storage space on a shelf and everything is right there on the console.

 

When PS4 comes out, every game I get will be digitial. If it's a great game that I'll be playing all the time I'll get it at full price or near it. For everything else I can wait until they discount it. Usually by the time I want to play some of these games anway it's been so long since I've gotten around to them they're already cheap on the store from PS+ discounts.

 

With ps4, assuming I download all my games from the beginning, and at the same time games are overall bigger in download size, I'll be needing a 2TB hard drive most likely as my 1TB is almost maxed and that's with another 25 games on my shelf that I can't download.

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013
Phasing out discs would also kill "used games."

But if i got the Lady of Us digitally, I wouldn't have got the naughty dog stickers.

Thats why they should sell a Digital Edition of all games with digital download code, case, manuals, stickers, posters, or any other cool stuff you get with a disc based game.
[URL=http://psnprofiles.com/Maggot5787][IMG]http://card.psnprofiles.com/1/Maggot5787.png[/IMG][/URL]
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Lombax Warrior
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013
I like having the option to buy digital or disc but sadly by PS5 everything will be like Steam.


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Welcoming Committee
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

[ Edited ]
Jul 8, 2013

Maggot5787 wrote:
I was thinking about how digital games are lousy for the following reasons:

-No Game Case
-No New Game Smell
-No manuals
-No Tangibility

I love paying for a new game in store because you get something to show for a $60 purchase.

Digital games should be cheaper to the consumer at the very least due to:
- No Print/Manufacturing costs
-No 3rd Party Distribution costs

So my point is this:

-They should sell a Digital Edition that everything a Disc game includes but instead of a disc, a voucher for a copy to download the game from the PSN
- I like being able to look down my tower of games and seeing a case there for every game I buy
- This option allows me to have both a case to own and look at to remind me I have it as well as changing a game without having to leave my seat.

Do you get what I mean?
Am I wrong?
What do you think?

1. Most new releases no longer have manuals. These (sadly) are becoming obsolete.

2. The reason digital / physical cost the same, is because the video game still cost the same amount to make, no matter how us gamers choose to buy it.

3. Selling an empty case, JUST to include a voucher for a digital download, would be pointless. If that is all it would take for you (or someone else) to buy digital, then just create your own cases at home. Buy some BRD cases, print out the sleeves of the games, and boom -- you have a case for your digital game.

 

 

I like physical>digital as well. If a game is released on disc AND digital, I will always buy the disc.

If it is only digital, than I obviously have no choice.

 

I'd rather physically own what I bought. This is the same reason I do not buy digital music or movies.

I'd rather purchase CDs/DVDs/BRDs.

 

 

Physical will never die out. There is plenty of room for both formats.

Digital is not the "future."

 

We will always continue to see big releases get physical and digital releases and smaller / indie titles get only digital releases.

Though, I do like that some digital games have eventually gotten disc releases too. I hope his happens more. (i.e. Journey / Flower combo, Telltale's The Walking Dead, etc.)

 

 

"You must make a friend of horror. Horror and moral terror are your friends. If they are not then they are enemies to be feared."


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Wastelander
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013

HorrorGod wrote:

 

Physical will never die out. There is plenty of room for both formats.

Digital is not the "future."

 


Whether or not physical media (in the form of ROMs) will ever permanently die out (personally, I believe it will), there is no denying that digital is the future.  It happened with music.  It happened with movies.  It happened with TV shows.  Now, it is happening with video games.

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Welcoming Committee
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013

DanSD wrote:

HorrorGod wrote:

 

Physical will never die out. There is plenty of room for both formats.

Digital is not the "future."

 


Whether or not physical media (in the form of ROMs) will ever permanently die out (personally, I believe it will), there is no denying that digital is the future.  It happened with music.  It happened with movies.  It happened with TV shows.  Now, it is happening with video games.


 

Yes, It happened with music, but they still sell CDs and in some cases, even Vinyl.

Yes, It happened with movies and TV shows, but they still sell BRDs and DVDs.

 

Digital is still just an option. Not the future. It has not replaced these formats.

Just because there is a generation out there that only downloads music, movies, TV shows, and video games, does not mean the physical format is (or ever will) die.

"You must make a friend of horror. Horror and moral terror are your friends. If they are not then they are enemies to be feared."


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Wastelander
Registered: 06/22/2013
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013

I'm pretty sure digital only will never fully take off for anything outside of music. It works for music because the files are so small and the way music is advertised is way different, it doesnt need a store to help sell the music, video games still do. Movies lay somewhere in between but movies still have a huge advertisement for the DVD/blu rays by the film being in theaters. Video Games have no huge public display outside of retailers.

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Wastelander
Registered: 06/21/2011
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013

HorrorGod wrote:

DanSD wrote:

HorrorGod wrote:

 

Physical will never die out. There is plenty of room for both formats.

Digital is not the "future."

 


Whether or not physical media (in the form of ROMs) will ever permanently die out (personally, I believe it will), there is no denying that digital is the future.  It happened with music.  It happened with movies.  It happened with TV shows.  Now, it is happening with video games.


 

Yes, It happened with music, but they still sell CDs and in some cases, even Vinyl.

Yes, It happened with movies and TV shows, but they still sell BRDs and DVDs.

 

Digital is still just an option. Not the future. It has not replaced these formats.

Just because there is a generation out there that only downloads music, movies, TV shows, and video games, does not mean the physical format is (or ever will) die.


Physical media is available, but corporate resources are focusing on digital.  It's cheaper (no manufacturing costs) and infinitely more convenient for both consumers and content providers.  Music CD sales have dwindled drastically, while digital music sales have skyrocketed.  Retailers who once thrived on selling music CDs are rapidly shutting down.  The same is happening with DVDs and Blu-ray.  Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy several years ago.  Blockbuster was everywhere.  If consumers preferred physical media, Blockbuster provided it.  Consumers have spoken with their wallet, and the majority prefer digital media (as far as music and TV/movies are concerned).  Corporations will flock to where the money is, and digital is where the money is.  Physical media is available, and will be for years to come.  At the same time, it is dwindling away, as the more convenient, less corporate resource-hungry digital content takes its place.

 

This hasn't occurred, to the same extent, with video games, but it no doubt will.  I'm an early adopter; sometimes this pays off, sometimes it doesn't.  I was an early adopter with both music and movies, and this paid off well.  I am also an early adopter with digital video games.  I have 174 games installed on my PS3, and every one of them is still available on PSN (I know this, because I recently replaced the motherboard on my PS3 and had to redownload all of my lost content).  Digital video games are paying off in similar ways as digital music and movies:  I don't have stacks of games cluttering my entertainment center, leaving room for more accessories; I don't have to search through drawers and stacks of games to find what I'm looking for; I don't have to worry about my discs getting scratched; I can't lose my games; my digital game manuals can't be lost or torn up; if I travel, visit a friend, etc, I can log onto their PS3 and access every single one of my games; I can take my PS3 and anywhere I go, I have 174 games without needing to carry 100+ discs; faster load times.. the convenience is incomparable.

 

I recommend taking the plunge and embracing the benefits of digital media.  If you really prefer physical, you can hold onto it for now, as it will remain a bit longer, but it's only a matter of time before it follows the same fate as any aging technology, and is cut off.

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Sackboy
Registered: 06/26/2013
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Re: I love opening my $60 game.

Jul 8, 2013

DanSD wrote:

HorrorGod wrote:

DanSD wrote:

HorrorGod wrote:

 

Physical will never die out. There is plenty of room for both formats.

Digital is not the "future."

 


Whether or not physical media (in the form of ROMs) will ever permanently die out (personally, I believe it will), there is no denying that digital is the future.  It happened with music.  It happened with movies.  It happened with TV shows.  Now, it is happening with video games.


 

Yes, It happened with music, but they still sell CDs and in some cases, even Vinyl.

Yes, It happened with movies and TV shows, but they still sell BRDs and DVDs.

 

Digital is still just an option. Not the future. It has not replaced these formats.

Just because there is a generation out there that only downloads music, movies, TV shows, and video games, does not mean the physical format is (or ever will) die.


Physical media is available, but corporate resources are focusing on digital.  It's cheaper (no manufacturing costs) and infinitely more convenient for both consumers and content providers.  Music CD sales have dwindled drastically, while digital music sales have skyrocketed.  Retailers who once thrived on selling music CDs are rapidly shutting down.  The same is happening with DVDs and Blu-ray.  Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy several years ago.  Blockbuster was everywhere.  If consumers preferred physical media, Blockbuster provided it.  Consumers have spoken with their wallet, and the majority prefer digital media (as far as music and TV/movies are concerned).  Corporations will flock to where the money is, and digital is where the money is.  Physical media is available, and will be for years to come.  At the same time, it is dwindling away, as the more convenient, less corporate resource-hungry digital content takes its place.

 

This hasn't occurred, to the same extent, with video games, but it no doubt will.  I'm an early adopter; sometimes this pays off, sometimes it doesn't.  I was an early adopter with both music and movies, and this paid off well.  I am also an early adopter with digital video games.  I have 174 games installed on my PS3, and every one of them is still available on PSN (I know this, because I recently replaced the motherboard on my PS3 and had to redownload all of my lost content).  Digital video games are paying off in similar ways as digital music and movies:  I don't have stacks of games cluttering my entertainment center, leaving room for more accessories; I don't have to search through drawers and stacks of games to find what I'm looking for; I don't have to worry about my discs getting scratched; I can't lose my games; my digital game manuals can't be lost or torn up; if I travel, visit a friend, etc, I can log onto their PS3 and access every single one of my games; I can take my PS3 and anywhere I go, I have 174 games without needing to carry 100+ discs; faster load times.. the convenience is incomparable.

 

I recommend taking the plunge and embracing the benefits of digital media.  If you really prefer physical, you can hold onto it for now, as it will remain a bit longer, but it's only a matter of time before it follows the same fate as any aging technology, and is cut off.


I wouldn't say movies are cut off just yet. So just as the movie industry keeps the $35+ Blu Ray movies hope alive with bonus discs and 3d/4d/scratchn'sniff, the video game industry will keep the $60 hope alive. You can expect a lot more from PS+ in the coming years(unfortunately the price will no doubt go up), and a lot of bonus content with physical copies.

 

 


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