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VP of Gaming
Registered: 12/08/2000
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Re: Game prices in 1998

May 30, 2013

Controllers do a lot more. now.

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Last Guardian
Registered: 04/26/2007
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Re: Game prices in 1998

May 30, 2013

PlayStation games were not $70 here in North America. Nintendo 64 games did actually sell for around that much, but the reason for that was because it was cartridges versus compact discs. When buying my first PlayStation game in 1995 it cost me $50. This would be the set price for years to come, with the exception of certain games that sold for higher amounts (Lunar 2, for instance, set me back $60 on the day it came out).


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Wastelander
Registered: 03/21/2008
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Re: Game prices in 1998

May 30, 2013

I didn't even own a Playstation back then but I remember games being significantly cheaper for general Playstation games.

 

I remember staring at the shelf of N64 games behind the glass wall. Would drool over the idea of playing some of them and imagine myself playing them.

 

Ultimately some of these games were very expensive. Like Donkey Kong 64 near launch. I don't remember how much I got it for but it was the last game that generation that I purchased.

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Treasure Hunter
Registered: 04/05/2009
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Re: Game prices in 1998

May 30, 2013

CaptainAlbator wrote:

Patches to fix game problems.


This.

 

Spyro 3 (PS1) had a bug that made the game impossible to complete if you leave a specific level before 100%ing it. They fixed the bug after the game was made, but you had to buy the newer version to get the patch. Everyone with the original version didn't get it. Me included.

 

Blasto (again on the PS1) had this glitch that caused a vehicle in the game to disappear. The game is, again, uncompletable without the vehicle. Unless you keep backups of your save, you will have to start over. Happened to me as well.

 

 

Now today any game can be patched up no matter how hopeless it is at first (read: Skyrim), but this seemed to create a double-edged sword that makes game makers get away with it before issuing a patch after enough people complain.

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