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Fender Bender
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 25, 2014

seraphim_falconu wrote:

@gR3yGh051 

So... you've never noticed that some television brands look much nicer than others? Say, a Samsung or Bravia blowing SunBrite, Sylvania, Element and Dynex out of the water visually?


 

In situations llike this you have to look at things like the contrast ratio. There is no set industry standard for how the contrast ratio is measued between all brands but it can give you a good indication overall. If you have a TV that is 3,000,000 :1 for a contrast ratio compared to one that is 10,000,000:1 then there will be a distinct difference on how the picture looks. The contrast ratio is the measure between the darkest darks and the whitest whites in the color spectrum of the TV. A higher contrast ratio will make the colors appear much more deep and rich and pop more off the screen. When comparing contrast ratio's it is better suited when comparing TV's from the same company, the higher end models will have a better ratio then the cheaper TV's. 

 

Ive visted both my parents in the past week and both have HDTV's, both are either older models or lower end models and compared to my 1080p 8,000,000:1 contrast ratio LED is shameful. The colors on my screen are so clean clear and crisp. The glass on the front is so clear as compared to the imaiges Ive seen on other TV's.

 

The simple rule of thumb is that you get what you pay for but keep in mind that TV that are of great quality are always dropping more in price. Not saying you need to spend $2,000 to get a good TV. There are many TV's out there that are excellent that are under the $1,000 mark

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MVP Support
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 25, 2014

gR3yGh051 wrote:

Punfisher wrote:


  There's 2D and 3D. 
Also a non-issue. 3D content for broadcast channels is very rare. And most movies that are in 3D, don't sell well and buying them is expensive. lets not forget glasses... active shutter glasses can cost upwards of $120 or more. Passive glasses are also a bit "expensive" as you'll need to spend $15 or more at the movie theater.

And the latest technology is 4K resolution.  It's 8 times the resolution of 1080p.
It is not....4k is 4 times the resolution of 1080p (2 times larger vertically, 2 times larger horizontally). 8k is 8 Times the resolution of 1080p. And that also doesn't matter because there is no 4k content that justifies the high cost of such a TV. And the processing power to play a game in 4k is obscenely expensive. 

  I'm not sure how a PS3 or PS4 game would look on a 4K television, but the posabilities are limitless these days.
They wouldn't look any better, because the source material ranges from 540p (for some PS3 games) to 1080p(on all PS4 games). And 1080p, upscaled to 4k, doesn't look any better even if 4k is exactly 4times the resolution. Upscaling doesn't work very well either because there is an inherent "fuzziness" to the image.

 


 


3D Games and Movies - Passive 3D in a TV is probably the most cost effective way to go.  As gR3y points out, seeing a 3D movie in the theater is usually about $4-5 more than the 2D version.  But the bright side is that you can take that exact same pair of 3D glasses you basically paid that $4-5 for and use it at home on most passive 3D TVs (Vizio, Panasonic, Samsung, etc).  I currently have 6 pairs of 3D glasses at home for my 42" Vizio 3DTV, and the TV only came with 2 of them.

 

4K/8K Content - Non-issue with the current generation of game consoles.  Sony has elected not to comment on the status of the PS4 being 4K/8K readiness.  While over at Microsoft, they have stated they are actively pursuing both 4K and 8K games and movies, yet the XBox One is struggling to run games even at 1080p (less than half of XB1 games run natively at 1080p).

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Sackboy
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 25, 2014
DO NOT USE 3D! You have been warned. Use the smallest size possible like 32 inch or smaller. Look it up.
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Splicer
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 25, 2014
What not use 3D? I do and find its very good, no noticable lag great colours and can convert 2D to 3D fairly decently. Even if you dont currently plan to use 3D it doesnt impact the quality of non 3D viewing and the dont cost much more than a non 3D (like i said mine was£220 with 4 pairs of glasses) and if more people bought 3D tvs the format would recieve more support from games companies. Trust me, untill you have played a game like Crisis 3 in 3D you havent truely experienced immersion in a game! Thats just my opinion though.
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MVP Support
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 25, 2014

Not really. Sure the graphics would be somewhat crisper on a new tv, but I appreciate the fact that the tv I use still works ok enough to play games on. It's good enough as is.


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Sackboy
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 25, 2014

Well really its up to you, but if you play on a TV that runs at the resolution the game was made for, it will look better.

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Splicer
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

[ Edited ]
May 25, 2014

Bought my Sony 55 inch tv less than a year ago.  Got it based on its input lag performance, at the time and to this day is in the top 3 of input lag  of any tvs out there.  I also considered its technology, how well it can output colors and display them as a whole.  Just doing a few weeks of research found the tv I wanted and rest was history.  It blows away my old DLP Sony tv I had prior.  Pretty much night and day.

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 26, 2014

i have a sharp 50 inch from like 2009 so would you guys recommend buying a newer tv for my ps4?

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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: Does the TV you use really matter?

May 27, 2014

gR3yGh051 wrote:

Punfisher wrote:

Sure it matters. 
No. It doesn't.
Yes.  It does.

We can start with the basics.  Would you rather play games on a black and white tv or color? 
Non-issue because color has been a "thing" since the 1950's. 
Hey man I was just making a point.  

Then there's resolution.  480p, 720p, 1080i, 1080p.
Another non-issue. 95% of all TV's sold today are 1080p.
Half the TVs at Walmart today are 720p, so you're wrong.  I also work in a different retail store and we sell many 720p tvs as well as 1080.


  And hertz as well.  60hz, 120hz, 240hz.
Also a non-issue, because broadcast programming is shown at 30hz. And the only time you'll need anything higher than 60Hz is if your source material exceeds 60fps. And in most TV's.... the refresh rate is not a refresh rate at all, but simply an image interpolation-processing gimmick.

The source material for the PS4 exceeds 60fps.

  There's 2D and 3D. 
Also a non-issue. 3D content for broadcast channels is very rare. And most movies that are in 3D, don't sell well and buying them is expensive. lets not forget glasses... active shutter glasses can cost upwards of $120 or more. Passive glasses are also a bit "expensive" as you'll need to spend $15 or more at the movie theater.

If you want 3D gaming it will matter what type of tv you use.  You can't do 3D gaming on a non-3D tv.  So it matters.

And the latest technology is 4K resolution.  It's 8 times the resolution of 1080p.
It is not....4k is 4 times the resolution of 1080p (2 times larger vertically, 2 times larger horizontally). 8k is 8 Times the resolution of 1080p. And that also doesn't matter because there is no 4k content that justifies the high cost of such a TV. And the processing power to play a game in 4k is obscenely expensive. 

4K resolution is 8 times the resolution of 1080p.  I did my research.

  I'm not sure how a PS3 or PS4 game would look on a 4K television, but the posabilities are limitless these days.
They wouldn't look any better, because the source material ranges from 540p (for some PS3 games) to 1080p(on all PS4 games). And 1080p, upscaled to 4k, doesn't look any better even if 4k is exactly 4times the resolution. Upscaling doesn't work very well either because there is an inherent "fuzziness" to the image.

This you may be right on.  Having said that, **bleep** is your problem?  You picked apart every word I said and didn't care about anybody else as if you were on some kind of witch hunt.  At the end of the day it really does matter what TV you use.  It all depends on what you want to use it for.  Watching a 3D movie on a TV that doesn't support it.  Watching 200" projector screen in a well lit room, doesn't work out too well.  Many retail stores continue to sell 720p TVs because they are less expensive.  People are still buying them.  If you're viewing a 1080p movie or game on a 720p TV you will not get the optimal picture. 

 

People are spending top dollar to get the best picture possible.  It does matter.  A $200 just doesn't get it done these days.

 


 


 


Get your Portable ID!
The gap between PS3 and everything before is so huge that backwards compatibility is more important now than ever. PS3 games should be preserved.
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