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Fender Bender
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 11, 2013

if you have just a basic understanding of electronics and electricity in general then you would know that a power surge in just itself can cause the YLOD but a reflow isn't going to fix it and leaving electronics turned on that they will generally last much longer than someone who turns it off everyday..

 

over 20 years in electricity and electronics repair so i know exactly what i am talking about here....should see some of the damage from power surges in the days of vacumm tubes,sometimes the capacitors would sound like a 12 gauge shotgun blowing off.

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Splicer
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 12, 2013

I would have to add get one of those special plug sockets put in your house too. (I forgot what it's called - it has kind of a surge protector in it)

 

That being said I leave mine plugged in, but in a surge protector,  but the surge protector is plugged into a crappy socket...as that's the only one available next to my television. (this house I live in is pretty old)

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First Son
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 12, 2013

yes. leave that in so you can play. play to 10-8 hours. do not get a yllow light

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I Only Post Everything
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 12, 2013
Just as a bit of an addendum here to the surge protector instruction. Take some time and take a look at the actual "surge protector" you are using. In many, many, MANY cases, all it really is is a power strip with little to no actual surge protection.

A company is allowed to call something a 'surge protector' if it offers even the smallest amount of "protection" from a very small change in power levels. While these are fine and dandy for regular small fluctuations in the current/voltage levels of every day electricity, they are completely useless when it comes to real surges that can damage your electronics.

If a lightning strike happens nearby, or a transformer blows close to your home, the surge that will come from that will generally blow right through 90% of the "surge protectors" in use.

The only way to fully prevent electrical surges from damaging your equipment is to unplug it from both the electrical system, and any other wired connections to your devices. (With a good electrical surge, it can come flying in through the ethernet cable, for example, and bug up your devices too).

The best surge supressor systems are designed as a part of the overall electrical system of the house. The outside of the home will generally have a network of wires and cables leading directly to ground so that if a lightning strike were to hit the house, the flow of electricity would go outside of the house and right into ground. Inside the house, at the point of entry into the fuse panel, there will be a supressor system designed to guide the sudden and unexpected surge of electricity directly to ground before it even gets into the main wiring of the house.

If you are in the process of building a home, or doing any major renovations, if you have the funding for it I would talk with your licensed electrician about having a professional surge supression system installed for your entire house. While the classical "surge protectors" you buy at Staples/Wal-Mart/Target/etc. will protect your equipment from the small little surges caused by multiple electronics being turned on at once in your house, they will generally do nothing to protect your equipment from the large surges caused by lightning strikes, transformer malfunctions, etc. outside of your house. A professional surge supression system is generally a bit of overkill if you are in a region where there aren't a great deal of electrical problems or lightning strikes, but if you've spent a lot of money on expensive electronics, it can be a great investment.
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Wastelander
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 12, 2013

I don't believe power surges are the soul cause of YLOD but they will fry your system. My PS1 meet its end due to one R.I.P.

My launch ps3 YLOD after 5 years of leaving it plugged in. Don't believe that was the cause either. Some hardware just fails weather its the thermal paste or what have you. A surge protector is smart to use either way.

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Keyblade Wielder
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 13, 2013
Mines plugged in a surge protector just flip the switch off.
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Ghost of Sparta
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 13, 2013
Well yeah....I'm not gonna unplug my ps3 everytime I want to turn it of or plug it in when I want to play it. Aint nobdy got time fo dat
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I Only Post Everything
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 13, 2013

Mine stays plugged in all the time.

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Fender Bender
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

Sep 13, 2013

CairothiBallad wrote:

I would have to add get one of those special plug sockets put in your house too. (I forgot what it's called - it has kind of a surge protector in it)

 

That being said I leave mine plugged in, but in a surge protector,  but the surge protector is plugged into a crappy socket...as that's the only one available next to my television. (this house I live in is pretty old)


Your talking about a GFCI outlet and those are not really for any surge protection,they are used for ground fault shorts,like throwing a toaster in the bath tub..
national electrical code has for several years mandated these in bathrooms and kitchen areas around sinks for all new homes.
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Splicer
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Re: Do you leave your PS3 plugged in?

[ Edited ]
Sep 13, 2013

kythunder wrote:

CairothiBallad wrote:

I would have to add get one of those special plug sockets put in your house too. (I forgot what it's called - it has kind of a surge protector in it)

 

That being said I leave mine plugged in, but in a surge protector,  but the surge protector is plugged into a crappy socket...as that's the only one available next to my television. (this house I live in is pretty old)


Your talking about a GFCI outlet and those are not really for any surge protection,they are used for ground fault shorts,like throwing a toaster in the bath tub..
national electrical code has for several years mandated these in bathrooms and kitchen areas around sinks for all new homes.

Ahhh that's what it is...thanks for reminding me of the name and it's function.  Hmmm does GFCI sockets help when using something like a hair dryer during a thunderstorm when a freak occurence of a lightning bolt golng through the electrical system of a house (well I guess the cord or something needs to be wet).  Sorry for kinda off topic for this topic discussion.

 

I have to thank my lucky stars that something didn't happen with that junk plug socket next to my TV. (I forgot to mention the fact that one of the surge protecting power strips is full of plugs.)

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