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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013

jimniner wrote:

Logical_Dolphin wrote:

jimniner wrote:

 

 

1. New memory.  I know, piracy and all that.  However, this is the third time Sony has changed the media format for the PSP line (and yes, I consider the Vita to be a part of that line because it is).  I'm tired of investing in new media only to find it obsolete for the next generation of the same product.  This is widely recognized as a significant part of the reason (along with lack of UMD support) for why the PSP Go was such a critical and abject failure.  And the price of the new PS Vita memory cards is a little (a lot) on the ridiculous side.  It's not a total deal killer, but it's a pretty big hurdle to put in front of people who are looking to upgrade.

 


As far as the PSPgo, I doubt that many people upgraded from the PSP to the PSPgo. The PSPgo was marketed as a premuim (and admittedly experimental) product designed for consumers that only wanted to do digital downloads. It had plenty of built in storage (16GB) for downloads, so buying additional memory wasn't a needed feature right away. The real problem was that Sony couldn't get enough digital downloads available on PSN fast enough, most likely because the digital rights of these games had to be secured separately. In most cases the for a new PSP game, it was available in retail far earlier than the digital version. Some of the more popular PSP games (like from Square-Enix) weren't available at all in the US market. 

 

Many of the digital distribution issues the PSPgo had have been rectified in the Vita, because it was clear that Sony didn't have all their ducks in a row when it came to digital distribution of their own games...


Exactly my point.  Most PSP owners didn't upgrade to the PSP Go, because it was another "start over" device, basically.  Now, it doesn't even begin to compete with the Vita, but it's just another example in the long history of how Sony ruins its own customer loyalty.  It's the perception that matters.  How do I know that the next generation of PS Vita (which is an inevitibility) will use the same memory cards?  For most other manufacturers, this isn't a concern, but Sony has made it a concern by their own decisions with this product line in the past.  Just saying ... they don't give us a whole lot of reasons to have faith in them here.


You seem to be stuck on the notion the the PSP Go was ment to be an upgrade for PSP owners, that wasn't really the case. It was ment for a new class of customer that preferred to buy all their games digitally. But the device was a bit ahead of its time, since Sony's own store was very slow to support the device with downloads.

 

The PSP Go used different memory cards (actually it is the same as the memory stick in a smaller format) because of its smaller form factor. The Sony brand memory cards for the PSP Go were actually more per GB than the Vita ones. The 2GB size sells for $20 and the 4GB sells for $30.

 

What makes you think that there will even be a next generation Vita? The Vita got off to such a bad start, I would be very surprised if Sony ever makes another portable gaming device....

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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013

mcbuttz78 wrote:

Logical_Dolphin wrote:

mcbuttz78 wrote:

InfinityDevil wrote:

Is it though?

 

Amazon is subsidizing its tablet by selling through music and videos, and collecting user data on what you are browsing, and what you are buying and playing.  They definitely do this with the Amazon App Store -- their store runs as a kernel level service on the tablets and can monitor what you are doing, and their terms of service no doubt indicate they will grab your demographics nicely.

 

Google is selling the tablet at very low profit margins because they make the money back on your google account.  They catalog and analyze everything you read write and buy with your account, even if they don't watch your activity on the tablet itself.  They see your searches, they monetize that with their primary source of revenue: advertising.

 

Sony... doesn't do those things?  Yes they know your profile by what you buy on the Store, they could potentially track what you play on the Vita as part of your gaming profile if you happen to be online at the time, and even that goes on and off with the Vita to save battery.  Sony tries to make a profit on the handheld, and then makes a royalty on every game sold.

 

These are two very different models.  With Google, Amazon, Microsoft Bing, and Android in general, the consumer is actually the product in many ways.  Android exists to keep you using Google services -- why do you think Amazon didn't just decide to use Google's Android instead of making their own flavor of it?  They want you in their world so they can watch, analyze, monetize, and sell to you more directly.  With Sony, Nintendo, and Microsoft, the product is the hardware, the games, and the service offerings.

 

And before you go down the rabbit hole of saying games are too expensive when so many iOS and Android apps are 99 cents or free, go find out how many iOS and Android developers are making money.  Only a select few can live off their game revenue, let alone fund further development.

 

Until consumers understand that they are selling away their privacy and personal activity data on their tablets and phones in order to bring the price of those devices down, they won't understand a standard-price electronic product like a handheld game device from Nintendo, Sony, or anybody else.

 

It could be that the era of the dedicated handheld gaming device is over, but I'd wager that Sony is trying to mitigate that with its PlayStation Mobile efforts and services like Music Unlimited, Netflix, YouTube, and other apps on the Vita.

 

I'm surprised more Android developers aren't going to Vita.  Yes the numbers are low for install base but the piracy rate is probably vanishingly small.  Android is hacked 10 ways to Sunday -- rooting any phone immediately gets copies of your app thrown into the wild to be side-loaded by whoever wants them at no charge.



 I dont know  about the rest of you's but this  opened my eyes> i got a hunch not to do biz with amazon and it served me correctly. i havebought aything off amazon  now i never will.. thank you for confirming that. kudo +1


I got some news for you. It doesn't matter where you go, your activity is going to be tracked somehow. If you want to avoid all tracking activity, go old school get rid of your computer and pay with cash when you go to the store.

 

Welcome to the 21st century....


  its alot  thing you can do not to  be  tracked on your  computer  last time i check . masking your isp was  a internet buisness and was sold in store and online.  internet protection  from spy ware and etc is as well.. Or just not  do  biz with them online  and save 100 of dollars a year. ill take last  way :smileyhappy:

 

 An furher more im not  gonna do  biz with amazon for sake  your  compassion for them, its my money.  . i worked for it. .  If   amazon online want my  money they better  get a ice water in  hell buisness started... and sell it at the  gates of them, If stock revenue gain is good  enough the  1st 3  qtrs. ill buy :smileyhappy:


You might as well stop doing business with anyone over the internet, just about all of them will track what you look at and buy, it isn't just Amazon...

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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013

I am not sure of the name of the site for the emulator but my cousin was playing grand theft and he said it was ps2. It looked like it was playing good.It may be something just out but I watched hem play it on his high doller tablet. I do not own a tablet so I did not pay attention to where he got it.

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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013
Logical_Dolphin wrote:
You seem to be stuck on the notion the the PSP Go was ment to be an upgrade for PSP owners, that wasn't really the case. It was ment for a new class of customer that preferred to buy all their games digitally. But the device was a bit ahead of its time, since Sony's own store was very slow to support the device with downloads.

The PSP Go used different memory cards (actually it is the same as the memory stick in a smaller format) because of its smaller form factor. The Sony brand memory cards for the PSP Go were actually more per GB than the Vita ones. The 2GB size sells for $20 and the 4GB sells for $30.

What makes you think that there will even be a next generation Vita? The Vita got off to such a bad start, I would be very surprised if Sony ever makes another portable gaming device....


It doesn't matter what you think the original intent of the PSP Go was, as a consumer it was presented as the next evolution of the PSP. Whether the Go's media was new to the world or not, it was new to PSP customers, and it was part of the reason why PSP owners didn't upgrade to the Go. Understand, the PSP, PSP Go, and PS Vita are all premium products. They are dedicated gaming machines that are the cream of the crop compared to competitor's products. Nobody can seriously say that any of the DS models have been as advanced as the available PSP models.

If Sony can figure this out, and mobilize the potential consumer base that is watching what happens with the PS Vita, there would be plenty of motivation to continue evolving this product line. Right now, there's not a huge reason to believe there will be another mobile device coming. However, want Sony wants consumers to believe is that the PS Vita is a sustainable product offering that will be supported for the forseeable future. All I'm saying is that as a consumer, if I believe that the PS Vita is going to last, Sony has done little in the past to cause me to believe that the media cards I invest in would still be viable in the next generation of their mobile gaming product line. That's all. Remember, there is a big difference in market reception and perception for you and I versus the average consumer. We're actively discussing this issue on a forum with a few hundred participants actively commenting on it. We're arguably far more passionate about Sony's product offerings than most consumers. Most just want things to be obvious and easy. The history of the PSP line is one of constantly evolving the product line into "start over" generations with new media and challenges with supporting applications. The secondary downfall of the Go was the poor preparation in the PSN Store. We're seeing that again on the Vita. The PS One Classics issue is affecting the Vita because that functionality is still early in its evolution and there still isn't a huge catalog of PS Vita games. Those kinds of issues discourage passionate gamers and fail to motivate average consumers.

I hope I'm not coming across as being negative or aggressive because I'm kind of getting a little feeling of frustration back (may just be me ... electronic comm tends to cause misinterpretation of tone). I think the Vita could be a watershed product for Sony, but they haven't figured out how to get past launch. They can't get the passion we show for the platform to translate into sales. A creeping slow release of games turns customers off. The price turns customers off ... not you or I because we see the tech involved, but for people buying a system for their kid, the PS Vita is $80 more and the memory and games are more expensive than DS/3DS games. For many parents (in a down economy), it's a pretty simple equation to solve. For existing PSP owners, there are a lot of barriers to acceptance that Sony hasn't started to deal with yet. We're less price sensitive, but we're more demanding in terms of what we already have and what we expect from the Vita compared to the PSP.

Sony can fix this issue pretty quickly, but have yet to make a market shifting movement. Hopefully, they will do so in a time period that we are still watching , we notice, and we start buying the Vita. If sales pick up it will drive Sony to expand it's support of the product line. The PS4 may also expand the interest in the Vita, as the Vita will likely gain some interest as an extension of the PS4 experience. That could help too. For me, there are things Sony could do to overcome my resistance as it stands now. A price cut would be good, but not necessary to get me into a Vita. A huge title release or your download voucher idea would likely be enough to get me over the fence.
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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

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Jan 6, 2013

jimniner wrote:
Logical_Dolphin wrote:
You seem to be stuck on the notion the the PSP Go was ment to be an upgrade for PSP owners, that wasn't really the case. It was ment for a new class of customer that preferred to buy all their games digitally. But the device was a bit ahead of its time, since Sony's own store was very slow to support the device with downloads.

The PSP Go used different memory cards (actually it is the same as the memory stick in a smaller format) because of its smaller form factor. The Sony brand memory cards for the PSP Go were actually more per GB than the Vita ones. The 2GB size sells for $20 and the 4GB sells for $30.

What makes you think that there will even be a next generation Vita? The Vita got off to such a bad start, I would be very surprised if Sony ever makes another portable gaming device....


It doesn't matter what you think the original intent of the PSP Go was, as a consumer it was presented as the next evolution of the PSP. Whether the Go's media was new to the world or not, it was new to PSP customers, and it was part of the reason why PSP owners didn't upgrade to the Go. Understand, the PSP, PSP Go, and PS Vita are all premium products. They are dedicated gaming machines that are the cream of the crop compared to competitor's products. Nobody can seriously say that any of the DS models have been as advanced as the available PSP models.

If Sony can figure this out, and mobilize the potential consumer base that is watching what happens with the PS Vita, there would be plenty of motivation to continue evolving this product line. Right now, there's not a huge reason to believe there will be another mobile device coming. However, want Sony wants consumers to believe is that the PS Vita is a sustainable product offering that will be supported for the forseeable future. All I'm saying is that as a consumer, if I believe that the PS Vita is going to last, Sony has done little in the past to cause me to believe that the media cards I invest in would still be viable in the next generation of their mobile gaming product line. That's all. Remember, there is a big difference in market reception and perception for you and I versus the average consumer. We're actively discussing this issue on a forum with a few hundred participants actively commenting on it. We're arguably far more passionate about Sony's product offerings than most consumers. Most just want things to be obvious and easy. The history of the PSP line is one of constantly evolving the product line into "start over" generations with new media and challenges with supporting applications. The secondary downfall of the Go was the poor preparation in the PSN Store. We're seeing that again on the Vita. The PS One Classics issue is affecting the Vita because that functionality is still early in its evolution and there still isn't a huge catalog of PS Vita games. Those kinds of issues discourage passionate gamers and fail to motivate average consumers.

I hope I'm not coming across as being negative or aggressive because I'm kind of getting a little feeling of frustration back (may just be me ... electronic comm tends to cause misinterpretation of tone). I think the Vita could be a watershed product for Sony, but they haven't figured out how to get past launch. They can't get the passion we show for the platform to translate into sales. A creeping slow release of games turns customers off. The price turns customers off ... not you or I because we see the tech involved, but for people buying a system for their kid, the PS Vita is $80 more and the memory and games are more expensive than DS/3DS games. For many parents (in a down economy), it's a pretty simple equation to solve. For existing PSP owners, there are a lot of barriers to acceptance that Sony hasn't started to deal with yet. We're less price sensitive, but we're more demanding in terms of what we already have and what we expect from the Vita compared to the PSP.

Sony can fix this issue pretty quickly, but have yet to make a market shifting movement. Hopefully, they will do so in a time period that we are still watching , we notice, and we start buying the Vita. If sales pick up it will drive Sony to expand it's support of the product line. The PS4 may also expand the interest in the Vita, as the Vita will likely gain some interest as an extension of the PS4 experience. That could help too. For me, there are things Sony could do to overcome my resistance as it stands now. A price cut would be good, but not necessary to get me into a Vita. A huge title release or your download voucher idea would likely be enough to get me over the fence.

We are just going to have to "agree to disagree" on what Sony's intention with the PSP Go was. IMO it makes little sense for a PSP owner to upgrade to a PSP Go, because (just like the Vita) one would have to rebuy their games on a digital format. It would only make sense for a brand new customer to consider the PSP Go as an alternative to the standard PSP.

 

These are quotes taken from Sony's press release on the PSP Go that IMO support my position:

"An evolution of the PSP™ platform, the PSP™go system is specifically suited to the lifestyle of today's consumers who prefer digital entertainment."

"The current PSP™-3000 and the UMD® format will continue to be available, providing consumers with the option to choose the PSP™ that's right for them."

 

As far as the memory card formats go, I can understand why they went with a new format. They needed to go with a new format where one couldn't easily directly manipuate the data on them, with a card reader. If card readers aren't available for the Vita's memory cards, it will curb its hacking. I'm sure that someone will make a card reader and sell it in the underground market, but it will never be widely available at your local Walmart or GameStop. IMO this will go a long way in protecting the Vita from being exploited. IMO what Sony should have done was to build in 16GB of storage just like the PSP Go, because this would have softened the need to immediately buy a brand new storage format.

 

Since Sony allowed the PSP market in this country to dry up years ago, like I said before, I don't believe there are enough PSP owners to reach out to make any sort of effect. In Japan where the PSP is still going strong, I can understand why they instituted their UMD Passport program over there...

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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013
Compared to what's coming out on 3DS, I'd say bleak.
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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013

Logical_Dolphin wrote:
As far as the memory card formats go, I can understand why they went with a new format. They needed to go with a new format where one couldn't easily directly manipuate the data on them, with a card reader. If card readers aren't available for the Vita's memory cards, it will curb its hacking. I'm sure that someone will make a card reader and sell it in the underground market, but it will never be widely available at your local Walmart or GameStop. IMO this will go a long way in protecting the Vita from being exploited. IMO what Sony should have done was to build in 16GB of storage just like the PSP Go, because this would have softened the need to immediately buy a brand new storage format.

 

Since Sony allowed the PSP market in this country to dry up years ago, like I said before, I don't believe there are enough PSP owners to reach out to make any sort of effect. In Japan where the PSP is still going strong, I can understand why they instituted their UMD Passport program over there...


Given on the memory card, that will help prevent piracy.  However, how bad could piracy get if the product never finds a market?  In the name of preventing piracy, it's entirely possible that Sony may have prevented sales as well.

 

You're absolutely right about the PSP market in the US.  Although, I will have to offer that I showed my PSP 2000 to my sister in law, who had just purchased (and was really enjoying playing with) a 3DS for her son.  When she saw the graphics (keep in mind, this device is circa 2007 - 5 years ago) she was blown away.  The 3D is cool, but the graphics on the 3DS don't come close to comparing to even the old PSP.  I can't imagine how much they drag compared to the Vita.  

 

If the PSP market has evaporated in the US, it stands to reason that those who have owned (or currently own) a PSP may be more suspicious of Sony now than before, and less likely to quickly adopt the new Vita.  They may (and likely do) feel a little burned by Sony for the lack of support for the PSP in the US.  That kind of market presence makes growing that market very hard.  Why would those folks give Sony another chance (even thought the Vita is the most amazing handheld system ever brought to market)?  What are the chances they will recommend the Vita to others?  Even more important, what are the chances they will buy one for their son/daughter instead of the 3DS?

 

Sony hasn't built a real strong track record (PSP Go is prime example) of expanding that market with "start over" systems.  The PSP Go never gained traction.  It was a lot of development, whether it was meant for a new market consumer or not, that ultimately produced no noticeable results.  The Vita is kind of suffering from the same thing.  It is not designed with the current PSP owner (or former PSP owner) in mind.  It's, again, being marketed to new participants in the market.  I just don't see that has having been a winning strategy for Sony in the past and don't understand why that's the path they are taking again.  Some companies have to learn everything the hard way.

 

Again, regardless of where we may disagree or the finer points and technicalities of the discussion, in the end, the Vita is not moving off the shelves like we would expect a system of that quality to do so.  It's far superior to anything else on the market.  The larger question, regardless of what may be my perspective on why I haven't upgraded to it (which is really all I've offered, if I've offered anything), is why nobody else seems to want it either.  Likely, we are probably all correct, which is an even bigger challenge for Sony.  Price, new proprietary memory (price, and lack of faith in its longevity),  lack of UMD support, competition from 3DS, competition from smart phones and tablets, a changing market receptance, perceived lack of game devlopment, a lack of marque titles available, spotty PS One Classics support, incomplete offering of PSP Classics downloads, no TV Out (just me apparently), and whatever other issues folks have raised.  I don't think it's a one-column problem for Sony.  I think all these issues, to varying degrees, and a host of other less discussed ones are probably creating a "perfect storm" of sorts for the PS Vita.  Throw in a 4 year long recession (with no end in sight), high unemployment, and a very weak dollar, and you get a soft market for luxury electronics.  

 

In the end, I hope Vita survives.  If they just so much as get the PS One Classics issues worked out, that could help me come to a comfort level to buy a Vita.  I'm not looking for miracles here, just something that looks like it's heading in the right direction.  Right now, my impression of the Vita is that it is floundering.  The 3DS is absolutely killing it, and for new customers to the market, it doesn't make any sense.  It's obviously not just a product quality and features issue, or the Vita would be pummeling the 3DS.  For me, I'm finding that my PSP is still a very satisfying product to own, and I don't have a burning need to upgrade (and I see it as an upgrade) to the Vita.  It's just too expensive and like you said, doesn't completely replace my PSP for me yet.  That doesn't mean I'll never get there, but my hope was that someone at Sony reads these conversations and maybe goes back to the drawing table on their strategy with the Vita.  I'd love to see them get all the bells and whistles worked out this year and really come back into the market strong.  They need better titles coming out.  They need to soften the concerns over the new memory format.  They need to motivate existing customers to come back to the fold or invest in the upgrade.  It's not a complicated problem to diagnose, the challenge is in figuring out which issues are worth the investment to fix.  RIght now, piracy isn't the problem on the Vita, raw sales velocity is the problem.  If I were Sony, I'd probably focus more on the latter and less on the former for now, or piracy won't ever be an issue for the Vita because it will disappear.

 

Just a side question, for anyone, does the DS line have the same kind of piracy issues the PSP does?  If not, why?  How is it that sticking with the SD card memory format for so long hasn't hurt them the way memory cards (according to Sony and Dolphin) have enabled piracy on the PSP?

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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 6, 2013
The DS had it way worse than the PSP; the PSP saw its first fully functional emulator last year whereas the DS had a working emulator since a year after it was released. You can imagine just how many people played roms in the emulator instead of getting a DS~.
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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 7, 2013

jimniner wrote:

Logical_Dolphin wrote:
As far as the memory card formats go, I can understand why they went with a new format. They needed to go with a new format where one couldn't easily directly manipuate the data on them, with a card reader. If card readers aren't available for the Vita's memory cards, it will curb its hacking. I'm sure that someone will make a card reader and sell it in the underground market, but it will never be widely available at your local Walmart or GameStop. IMO this will go a long way in protecting the Vita from being exploited. IMO what Sony should have done was to build in 16GB of storage just like the PSP Go, because this would have softened the need to immediately buy a brand new storage format.

 

Since Sony allowed the PSP market in this country to dry up years ago, like I said before, I don't believe there are enough PSP owners to reach out to make any sort of effect. In Japan where the PSP is still going strong, I can understand why they instituted their UMD Passport program over there...


Given on the memory card, that will help prevent piracy.  However, how bad could piracy get if the product never finds a market?  In the name of preventing piracy, it's entirely possible that Sony may have prevented sales as well.

 

You're absolutely right about the PSP market in the US.  Although, I will have to offer that I showed my PSP 2000 to my sister in law, who had just purchased (and was really enjoying playing with) a 3DS for her son.  When she saw the graphics (keep in mind, this device is circa 2007 - 5 years ago) she was blown away.  The 3D is cool, but the graphics on the 3DS don't come close to comparing to even the old PSP.  I can't imagine how much they drag compared to the Vita.  

 

If the PSP market has evaporated in the US, it stands to reason that those who have owned (or currently own) a PSP may be more suspicious of Sony now than before, and less likely to quickly adopt the new Vita.  They may (and likely do) feel a little burned by Sony for the lack of support for the PSP in the US.  That kind of market presence makes growing that market very hard.  Why would those folks give Sony another chance (even thought the Vita is the most amazing handheld system ever brought to market)?  What are the chances they will recommend the Vita to others?  Even more important, what are the chances they will buy one for their son/daughter instead of the 3DS?

 

Sony hasn't built a real strong track record (PSP Go is prime example) of expanding that market with "start over" systems.  The PSP Go never gained traction.  It was a lot of development, whether it was meant for a new market consumer or not, that ultimately produced no noticeable results.  The Vita is kind of suffering from the same thing.  It is not designed with the current PSP owner (or former PSP owner) in mind.  It's, again, being marketed to new participants in the market.  I just don't see that has having been a winning strategy for Sony in the past and don't understand why that's the path they are taking again.  Some companies have to learn everything the hard way.

 

Again, regardless of where we may disagree or the finer points and technicalities of the discussion, in the end, the Vita is not moving off the shelves like we would expect a system of that quality to do so.  It's far superior to anything else on the market.  The larger question, regardless of what may be my perspective on why I haven't upgraded to it (which is really all I've offered, if I've offered anything), is why nobody else seems to want it either.  Likely, we are probably all correct, which is an even bigger challenge for Sony.  Price, new proprietary memory (price, and lack of faith in its longevity),  lack of UMD support, competition from 3DS, competition from smart phones and tablets, a changing market receptance, perceived lack of game devlopment, a lack of marque titles available, spotty PS One Classics support, incomplete offering of PSP Classics downloads, no TV Out (just me apparently), and whatever other issues folks have raised.  I don't think it's a one-column problem for Sony.  I think all these issues, to varying degrees, and a host of other less discussed ones are probably creating a "perfect storm" of sorts for the PS Vita.  Throw in a 4 year long recession (with no end in sight), high unemployment, and a very weak dollar, and you get a soft market for luxury electronics.  

 

In the end, I hope Vita survives.  If they just so much as get the PS One Classics issues worked out, that could help me come to a comfort level to buy a Vita.  I'm not looking for miracles here, just something that looks like it's heading in the right direction.  Right now, my impression of the Vita is that it is floundering.  The 3DS is absolutely killing it, and for new customers to the market, it doesn't make any sense.  It's obviously not just a product quality and features issue, or the Vita would be pummeling the 3DS.  For me, I'm finding that my PSP is still a very satisfying product to own, and I don't have a burning need to upgrade (and I see it as an upgrade) to the Vita.  It's just too expensive and like you said, doesn't completely replace my PSP for me yet.  That doesn't mean I'll never get there, but my hope was that someone at Sony reads these conversations and maybe goes back to the drawing table on their strategy with the Vita.  I'd love to see them get all the bells and whistles worked out this year and really come back into the market strong.  They need better titles coming out.  They need to soften the concerns over the new memory format.  They need to motivate existing customers to come back to the fold or invest in the upgrade.  It's not a complicated problem to diagnose, the challenge is in figuring out which issues are worth the investment to fix.  RIght now, piracy isn't the problem on the Vita, raw sales velocity is the problem.  If I were Sony, I'd probably focus more on the latter and less on the former for now, or piracy won't ever be an issue for the Vita because it will disappear.

 

Just a side question, for anyone, does the DS line have the same kind of piracy issues the PSP does?  If not, why?  How is it that sticking with the SD card memory format for so long hasn't hurt them the way memory cards (according to Sony and Dolphin) have enabled piracy on the PSP?


Addressing your first point, piracy got so bad on the PSP it made it not worthwhile for many developers to make games on it. Sony had to take measures to make sure the Vita won't suffer the same fate and allow developers to feel more at ease making games for it.

 

IMO I believe the 3DS to be a more powerful system than the PSP, I believe the capability is rated to be between the GameCube and Wii in terms of its capabilites. Since the systems have few common games it makes it difficult to make direct comparisons, and 3DS games tend to have a more cartoony look to them compared to the PSP.

 

Even though Nintendo's market share has shrunk down too, they are smart by targeting many different consumer types. They have plenty of edutainment titles, that I'm sure parents appreciate, and they can always rely on their classic brands.  Sony target market has always been narrorwer than Nintendo's, and there really isn't that iconic game that appeals to a big audience.  So it really isn't that big of a surprise to me that Nintendo is doing better in today's market.

 

But from what I have seen, there has something (I can't really describe) that is missing about Sony's marketing with the Vita. It launched at the same pricepoint as the PSP and had basically the same diversity of games to choose from. I think it has something to do with that many companies outside of Sony, just weren't excited about the Vita's prospects from the beginning. When the PSP first came out, there was all kinds of accessories made for it (something like what you see for iPhone products), because it was the new "it" device. That certainly did not happen with the VIta.

 

IMO the two main problems with the Vita are its pricepoint and its game selection. Even though the 3DS may be less powerful it has far more games to choose from, which I think makes it seem like a better value for many people. From what I understand there are only a handful of titles coming out for the VIta for the first half of 2013, so anyone buying one now is going to be taking a leap of faith hoping that there will be even better games released later on. I don't think we will see that constant flow of software for the Vita until later this year, at the earliest. This is why I believe PS+ is so important to include the VIta, that way current owners will consistantly have new content to consume in the meantime.

 

Although I don't know too much about DS piracy, I don't beleive the DS would even support games played from a SD card, since the Nintendo store (unlike the PS store) doesn't sell downloads of retail games. I believe the issue has to do with underground flash carts sold on the internet that are loaded with iillegal ROM downloaded from the internet...

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Re: Bleak or Bright: The PlayStation Vita’s Past and Future

Jan 7, 2013
SONY said that PSPGO was a test to see if people were willing to embrace digital ONLY. so, the VITA almost became DIGITAL ONLY. man . this thing would fail miserably. although i have mad digital downloads but many people dont want to use psn. thank god PSPGO failed. anyway i cant wait for vita futures. E3 isnt really far away and we getting KZ maybe next month. good luck sony prove them media wrong again.



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