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Oct 30 2012
By: OptimusC Wastelander 684 posts
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AC3: Liberation Reviews Thread

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54 replies 1883 views Edited Oct 30, 2012

Friday (for me) can't come soon enough!!!!

 

 

Here's the link!

http://www.psvitadirect.com/games/game-reviews/assassins-creed-iii-liberation-ps-vita-game-review/

 

Here's the article!

 

"Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation (PS Vita) Game Review

It’s 1765 with Spanish forces scheming to take control of Louisiana in the south – but they have yet to deal with brand new Assassin’s Creed protagonist Aveline who will play a crucial role in the turbulent beginnings of a new nation.

Although Assassin’s Creed spin-offs on handhelds have been done before on both the DS and PSP. Yet, it’s apparent right from the first press of the X button than Ubisoft have really outdone themselves this time in tying Liberation to the PS3 game creating two totally different adventures set in different parts of 18th Century America but with overlapping timelines.

Obviously, without spoiling how both titles are tied together storywise, it is clear that there are more than a few similarities in both the design and gameplay on offer. Whilst Connor deals with the Frontier, Aveline has the Bayou. Compared to the PS3 version, it is true that Aveline is pitted against fewer hostilities but she deals with them all in pretty much the same vein as you fight large predators in Assassins’ Creed III, more often then not in quick time events. It also had a familiar Arkham Asylum/City combat feel to it, which is never a bad thing. The Vita swamps provides hours of exploration with treasures to be found in trees whilst smugglers are dotted around offering you gear and weapons.

Exploring the swampland is just so much fun, jumping from branch to branch, swimming through stagnant waters, canoeing and even wrestling with crocs. Apart from the main swampy story of hunting down Acolytes there are also side missions to go at such as curing locals of an intense fever by tracking down special mushrooms.

So far Aveline might sound a bit of a softy compared to Connor but fear not as she is just as agile as Connor. If it’s brutality you are after, there’s plenty to hack at in Liberation’s story missions. Aveline and Connor share the same weakness for exaggerated melee kills and she’s a dab hand with her “sugar cane machete”.

Although the swamplands play a big part in the story mode there is so much more than that. Without spoiling too much, some of the subplots involve the slave trade and the military resources that France eventually uses in their war for independence. The first main story mission involves Aveline infiltrating a fort in the Bayou where several slaves have been kidnapped. All isn’t as clear cut as it seems, with the slaves not all that eager to be rescued. The story also involves you working with an ally in New Orleans, an accountant named Gerald. His take is to get answers by drawing out a diffident governor from hiding and Aveline manages this by goading a rebellion and seizing a gunpowder delivery.

Abviously, stealing said gunpowder is far from smooth running. Fans will be glad to hear there are horse carriage sequences made all the more difficult thanks to having to weave through the tight streets of New Orleans. This is one of the few times you’ll find yourself wanting to use the touch controls in favour of the physical buttons. Thankfully, they all respond well: you tap the screen to speed up, press and hold to slow down. Talking of touch controls, it was a blessing that there was no Uncharted touch gimmickry here and players will only have to resort to touch controls on the odd occasion just to try them out rather than being obliged to use them. A good example is swamp canoeing. Although you can use the rear touch screen to paddle, you’ll undoubtedly find yourself reverting to the X button as it is much, much less fiddly.

The protagonist is just as adept as any other assassin in laying low and taking out enemies from long range. The Vita does away with manual aiming when it comes to using a poisonous blow dart. You just have to maintain your line of sight and stay undetected for a couple seconds whilst holding down the triangle button for an accurate shot. The game is jam packed with stealth missions which don’t allow you to go in, all machete’s swinging. If you get spotted when on a stealth mission, it’s back to the checkpoint with you.

The franchise is also renowned for placing strong emphasis on blending in with the crowds and jumping over rooftops. You’ll be happy to hear that this plays a massive part in Liberation, mainly due to Aveline’s background and her “need” to keep her secret assassin side a secret. How is it implemented here? Well there is a gameplay mechanic known as the Persona system. Basically, as Aveline is the daughter of a French merchant and a slave, her privileged upbringing makes her the perfect mole. Whatever Aveline chooses to wear conditions the abilities available to her. When dressed as a slave, she can seamlessly blend in with the lower classes, and these loose clothes mean she can run to her hearts content. When dressed as an assassin, she is equipped to the teeth with killing tools and can free roam, but she sticks out like a sore thumb. Finally, she can wear a stunning, bright green aristocrat dress, which obviously slows her down and restricts her use of weapons but it does let her get into areas only the high society are allowed to enter. You can also pull down wanted poster’s to reduce suspicions and charm aristocrats who will help you out of a muddle.

So, apart from the gameplay, how does it all stand up on the Vita? Well, this is where the game loses a few points, but only a few. There is a great deal of detail (obviously downgraded from home consoles) but it can be a bit on the choppy side. Although constant, the frame-rate is low as Aveline moves explores the swamps with the Vita clearly struggling to cope with all the information the game card throws at it. Having said that, the game does manage to render a much more habitated world than previous handheld attempts. Qualms aside, the controls couldn’t have been better – fully responsive and there were no fiddly controls to hinder gameplay, particularly as gamers are not obliged to stick to touch controls. The always important Assassins Creed mechanics are rock solid, as always.

Talking of Assassin’s Creed III on the PS3 and Liberation, an Ubisoft spokesman said that the games aren’t so intertwined so you don’t really need to play them in any particular order. The truth is, Liberation plays as a great standalone game and there really is no need to have played Assassin’s Creed III beforehand, although you’d be mad not to play it in parallel or afterwards as Liberation will leave you yearning for more action. Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation isn’t as domineering as its predecessors on the PS3, nor as graphically impressive, but it plays brilliantly and has just as much of a story to tell as it’s big brothers. Surely that’s enough to keep fans of the series happy." 9/10.

Howard Gorman
Editor-in-Chief / Features Editor
PPSF.co.uk"

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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

Oct 30, 2012
Reading the article in that link, nowhere does it say that the game scored a 9/10~.

It looks promising though, I hope the technical issues mentioned won't hinder the game's image once reviews come in as publicity is all the game needs to attract new PSV users~.
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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

Oct 30, 2012

you're right!  that's why i didn't put it in the quotes.  however, the author did post his own review on N4G.com and there he posted his score.  I will place that link here now.

 

Enjoy!:

http://n4g.com/news/1110760/assassins-creed-iii-liberation-vita-review-psvdirect

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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

Oct 30, 2012

I picked this up at midnight and I have to say if you own a Vita this game is a must have. The gameplay is what you would expect from an assassins game and very little if anything was compromised in terms of the games integrity. The visuals are great but the opening sequence looked a little off. The videos online don't do the games looks justice. Great game. Thank you Ubisoft.

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Re: AC3: Liberation Reviews Thread

[ Edited ]
Oct 30, 2012

Now for GameInformers Review:

 

here's the link!:

http://www.gameinformer.com/games/assassins_creed_iii_liberation/b/playstation_vita/archive/2012/10/...

 

Here's the article!:

"Assassin's Creed III Liberation The Brotherhood Finds A Home On Handheld

The Assassin’s Creed series is one of the biggest success stories of this hardware generation. The historical open worlds, stunning visuals, and cinematic moments showcase the best of what console gaming can provide. While it offers an outstanding experience on the big screen, that ambition has not translated well to handhelds. Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation is the first portable entry to feel like a real Assassin’s Creed game – even if it isn’t among the best of them.

Most of the series’ hallmarks are present in some form. You run around a bustling city, assassinate slavers and business rivals, and search for an artifact from the First Civilization. At the heart of the action is Aveline, a heroine with plenty of personality and a cool arc – especially once the story starts exploring the gray area between Assassin and Templar. The experience doesn’t feel like a low-budget imitation of the real thing, though it admittedly isn’t as polished or extensive as what you find in Assassin’s Creed II or III. 

Aveline’s main mission takes her between New Orleans, the bayou, and other locations, but she encounters a handful of diversions along the way. The main money-making loop involves her father’s shipping business. You load up ships with cargo, and then sell that cargo at a different port after the ship’s abbreviated real-time voyage. This addictive mechanic replaces the money you automatically get at intervals in other games, but I like how it requires more participation than simply sitting back and watching the money roll in. I only wish the shipping empire were accessible from more locations; it is inconvenient to hoof it across town to administer your fleet.

Other side missions involve enhancing your shipping, curing poisoned villagers, buying out rival shops, and finding collectibles. Without the constant and automatic influx of money, the value of these tasks is questionable, but they contribute to the sense of activity in the world and keep you occupied when you aren’t slicing through your enemies.

Liberation features a combat system similar to the one found in Assassin’s Creed III, reducing complexity while still making you feel like a capable killer. I miss the ease of Ezio mowing through a group of guards in seconds, but Aveline’s chain-kill ability is a good compromise. Instead of being a natural part of your moveset, it is a special ability that you activate in order to clear out a bunch of attackers in one satisfying swoop. The renewed focus on countering keeps you on your toes, but aggression remains an option. New tools like the whip and the blowgun are great additions to the arsenal, and Aveline shares Connor’s affinity for hatchets.

When Liberation follows the lead of other Assassin’s Creed titles, it excels. When it tries to carve out its own identity, it stumbles. Aveline’s unique hook is her three personas: the assassin, the lady, and the slave. In theory, the abilities of each encourage you to swap them frequently. In practice, the interplay between three personas’ characteristics is poorly thought out. For example, the lady can charm guards, but can’t climb anything – no scaling buildings, leaping fences, or clambering onto the dock if you fall in the water. Every persona has some sort of handicap like that, making them each seem like one-third of a true assassin instead of giving Aveline access to her full range of abilities.

Apart from the single-player campaign (which took me about 12 hours to complete), you can participate in an asynchronous multiplayer mode – but the less said about it, the better. It’s shallow and boring and should be avoided. Another low point is the Vita-specific features; they occasionally feel gimmicky, but more often they are just plain broken. The camera doesn’t detect a bright light even when held directly up to a bulb, the tilt function turns a simple ball-rolling maze into a disaster, and pickpocketing with the rear touchpad rarely works. Liberation serves as a case study in tragic implementation of the Vita’s unique capabilities – probably not what Sony and Ubisoft were hoping for from a system exclusive. 

Despite the issues, fans of the series should still seriously consider playing Liberation. None of the worst problems are embedded into the core gameplay. Combat is fun, climbing and navigation works well, the story feels like a natural part of the AC universe. The tie-ins to Assassin’s Creed III are minimal (mainly one mission near the end), but Liberation may hint at what areas the series is exploring next.  It isn’t a required piece of the puzzle, but I had fun with Aveline and enjoyed seeing her part in history unfold."

 

GI Rating 7.75
 
  • Concept:A full-fledged Assassin’s Creed title on a handheld system
  • Graphics:Apart from a few visual glitches and pop-in, this is a consistently great-looking game
  • Sound:The music doesn’t dazzle, but it feels appropriate. The voice performances are well done, with the exception of a few bad accents
  • Playability:The basics all work well, but some camera and targeting issues pop up occasionally. The Vita-specific gimmicks are terrible
  • Entertainment:Despite the inconveniences, Assassin’s Creed fans should appreciate the combat, story, and characters
  • Replay:Moderate
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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

Oct 30, 2012

Any details about multi-player? Sorry I'll admit I did not read through all of that. I ain't trying to spoil too much.

 

I just had seen the Wiki and it specifically states that you get the Multiplayer Skin which I had known but I don't know it just seems weird to give a skin for a multi-player that is only strategy based, maybe that is all it is? I am just wondering if there is actually more to the multi-player than what was shown.

 

I just really want to make sure before I have to pick between this and Ragnarok today. So has anyone played it and can give some details? Not saying it won't be good and I am still getting it but I just want to get a good multi-player game right now.

 


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Re: AC3: Liberation Reviews Thread

Oct 30, 2012

and now for IGN's:

 

Here's the link!:
 
Here's the article!:
 
"The Brotherhood meets Batgirl.

October 30, 2012 Since its launch late last year in Japan and early this year everywhere else, the PlayStation Vita has been looking for "a system seller" -- an exclusive title so good consumers would have no choice but to buy Sony's handheld. Assassin's Creed III: Liberation has the bullet points you'd expect to fill this void with the franchise's trademark gameplay and open world, but it's not enough to make it a must own. Liberation is good, but it's not great.

Assassin's Creed III: Liberation casts us as Aveline, a young woman living in New Orleans in before and during the American Revolution. When her mother -- a freed slave -- disappears, Aveline falls into the Assassins’ Brotherhood and starts stabbing Templars. If you're looking for a more detailed account of her journey from child to killer, you won't get it in Assassin's Creed III: Liberation, and that's one of its major flaws.

 

Aveline is the first female lead for the franchise, and her internal struggle could make for an extremely interesting story – she’s the privileged daughter of a slave while slavery rages on. However, Liberation glosses over those threads. Outside of a bio page in the main menu, you're never given any details on how this woman went from a lost girl to an assassin. How did her mentor train her to kill without her stepmother or father noticing?

I keep comparing Aveline's tale to that of Batgirl in the old Adam West Batman TV show -- her plotline is thin and conveniently glosses over facts that would upend it. Our hero's just out to pull missions and then get back to being daddy's little girl. That's disappointing; a more grounded tale would've done wonders for this game.

Luckily, pulling off missions is fun for the most part. The controls that have defined the Assassin's Creed franchise are an excellent fit for the PlayStation Vita and will have players running over rooftops and silently stabbing enemies in no time. Ease behind the Vita's dual analog sticks, and you'll feel at home, especially when missions have you infiltrating parties and killing politicians. The setup and execution of Liberation is just like the other Assassin’s Creed games, complete with the occasional, accidental leap to your death.

The fact that this stuff is still this much fun to do this far into the franchise is partially because Ubisoft keeps iterating on what works. Liberation boasts an active open world for Aveline to explore -- one that stretches from downtown New Orleans to the bayou and a few other places I won't spoil. These locales act as the backdrop for your story missions, but the world is packed with side quests from freeing slaves to buying shops. There are nearly 10 memory sequences to Aveline's story, but there's plenty to do after the credits roll.

Liberation is good, but it's not great.

A big part of that additional content is Personas. Aveline has three Personas in Liberation, acting as costume changes with individual pros and cons. The Assassin Persona gives Aveline access to all of her weapons but gains notoriety quickly -- something that makes patrols more likely to go on alert when they see you. Meanwhile, the Slave persona is weak in combat but can blend in with workers to avoid detection. Finally, the Lady persona is for hiding among the New Orleans elite and charming guards.

It's a three-part system that has its moments of coolness, but starts as a bit of a headache. In the beginning, you're not offered these Personas as choices for tackling a mission; you're forced to use them. All I wanted was to run around the rooftops as the Assassin, but I instead had to be a prim and proper lady for a few quests. You’re given more choice later -- and each persona comes with its own side quests -- but it never becomes the true "choose how you play" setup. Plus, "charming" is one of the most "gamey" moments in any Assassin's Creed. Aveline waves at a guard, a heart fills in over his head, and the oaf will follow you around like a puppy -- even as you march over to kill his boss in a restricted area.

With the exception of the weapon wheels defaulting to hatchet and gun between every load screen, the traditional controls work well here -- until wonky PlayStation Vita-specific stuff gets added in. It's bearable for the most part (swiping the backtouch to pickpocket) and intuitive in some cases (pinch to zoom on the map), but then it gets off the rails. Pinching the front and rear touch screens to tear open a letter pulled me out of the world Ubisoft was trying to create, and decoding letters by holding a light to the rear camera never worked well for me. There's even a maddening ball-rolling mini-game using the handheld's gyroscopes. Liberation is a reminder that games don’t need to capitalize on every available gimmick, and often shouldn’t.

Yay. Touch.

Speaking of tacked on, Assassin's Creed III: Liberation packs an asynchronous multiplayer mode. Here, you'll choose if you're with the Brotherhood or the Templars, and then start tapping nodes around the world. You never engage in any combat, but assign troops to attack or defend a spot. All the other people playing multiplayer are doing this too, so there's a constant tug of war as to who is in charge of the nodes. The mode is boring and poorly explained, and I had it glitch out on me a couple of times to where I couldn't quit. Luckily, this mode isn't why anyone's buying Liberation.

When it comes to looks, Assassin's Creed III: Liberation alternates between stunning and substandard. There are screenshots in our gallery that look jaw dropping, and Liberation lives up to the promotional material. But then things start moving. Assassin's Creed III: Liberation struggles with framerate issues from start to finish. Sometimes it feels like Aveline's running a bit slower than she should be, and other times she'll practically teleport from place to place as the game catches up with her. There's a lot of detail to Liberation, but you pay the performance cost to see it all. Plus while the soundtrack is sweeping, dialogue and effects can sound tinny.

That's the weird thing about Assassin's Creed: Liberation: it goes back and forth from being cool to being lame. You'll earn a chain kill (think 'Mark and Execute' from Splinter Cell) and then have to use the touch screen for something goofy. You'll use your whip to swing from tree branches and then have to watch the framerate slowdown. You'll love the idea of Aveline, but you'll never really get to know her story.

 
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The Verdict

Assassin's Creed III: Liberation is a simplified version of the Assassin's Creed franchise. The moves and kills you'd expect are here, but the story is boiled down to be easy to jump in and out of. That takes away some of the excitement in playing through it.

 
 
 
7.2
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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

Oct 30, 2012

AXE_420 wrote:

I picked this up at midnight and I have to say if you own a Vita this game is a must have. The gameplay is what you would expect from an assassins game and very little if anything was compromised in terms of the games integrity. The visuals are great but the opening sequence looked a little off. The videos online don't do the games looks justice. Great game. Thank you Ubisoft.


This ^^^^... picked mine up last night along with NFS:MW, and both games are must have's. Videos online do NOTHING for these two games. These are two full blown console quality and experience games for the Vita. Extremely beyond happy with these 2 games.

 

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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

Oct 30, 2012

ProfessorGerbik wrote:

Any details about multi-player? Sorry I'll admit I did not read through all of that. I ain't trying to spoil too much.

 

I just had seen the Wiki and it specifically states that you get the Multiplayer Skin which I had known but I don't know it just seems weird to give a skin for a multi-player that is only strategy based, maybe that is all it is? I am just wondering if there is actually more to the multi-player than what was shown.

 

I just really want to make sure before I have to pick between this and Ragnarok today. So has anyone played it and can give some details? Not saying it won't be good and I am still getting it but I just want to get a good multi-player game right now.


"Speaking of tacked on, Assassin's Creed III: Liberation packs an asynchronous multiplayer mode. Here, you'll choose if you're with the Brotherhood or the Templars, and then start tapping nodes around the world. You never engage in any combat, but assign troops to attack or defend a spot. All the other people playing multiplayer are doing this too, so there's a constant tug of war as to who is in charge of the nodes. The mode is boring and poorly explained, and I had it glitch out on me a couple of times to where I couldn't quit. Luckily, this mode isn't why anyone's buying Liberation."

 

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Re: One of the first AC3: Liberation Reviews 9/10

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Oct 30, 2012

OptimusC wrote:

ProfessorGerbik wrote:

Any details about multi-player? Sorry I'll admit I did not read through all of that. I ain't trying to spoil too much.

 

I just had seen the Wiki and it specifically states that you get the Multiplayer Skin which I had known but I don't know it just seems weird to give a skin for a multi-player that is only strategy based, maybe that is all it is? I am just wondering if there is actually more to the multi-player than what was shown.

 

I just really want to make sure before I have to pick between this and Ragnarok today. So has anyone played it and can give some details? Not saying it won't be good and I am still getting it but I just want to get a good multi-player game right now.


"Speaking of tacked on, Assassin's Creed III: Liberation packs an asynchronous multiplayer mode. Here, you'll choose if you're with the Brotherhood or the Templars, and then start tapping nodes around the world. You never engage in any combat, but assign troops to attack or defend a spot. All the other people playing multiplayer are doing this too, so there's a constant tug of war as to who is in charge of the nodes. The mode is boring and poorly explained, and I had it glitch out on me a couple of times to where I couldn't quit. Luckily, this mode isn't why anyone's buying Liberation."

 


Ah Ok thanks for the confirmation. Looks like I will be getting this a liltte later then no offense, I still love you Aveline.

 

I just am broke and have to priortize.

 

Oh and can you confirm NFS is Cross Buy? Might as well ask that also, I know it was supposed to be but again just double checking or did you only get the Vita version?

 

 


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