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Dec 16 2012
By: Rossome Lombax Warrior 168 posts
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Spamming? Or Effective Strategy? (An Opinion Essay)

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41 replies 1721 views Edited Dec 18, 2012

Spam.  I love it.  Especially when it's lightly fried with eggs and rice.  Yum.
Spam

But srsly:  To spam moves is, as most of us already know, to constantly repeat a move.  Spamming moves is obviously a greatly despised tactic here on the forums, but who is to blame when this happens?  The person repeating the move over and over again?  Or the people who keep getting hit by it?

Every fighting game has an intentionally varied cast of characters who have strengths and weaknesses.  Let's assume for a bit that everyone wants to win.  Not just mess around and have fun, but win.  Would it not make sense to utilize a strength of your chosen character and exploit the weakness of your opponent to achieve victory?

Let's take Street Fighter, for example -- the most world renowned competitive fighting game.  Ryu has his Hadoken to keep opponents away and build up chip damage.  Guile's best feature of his light Sonic Boom is that he can actually move with it and cover his next attack.  Vega's claw gives him a very long reach which he can use to quickly damage and interrupt an opponent from range.  Balrog is another character with long reach but also many special moves that move him forward, allowing him to pressure an opponent into a corner where they are forced to deal with his mix-ups.

Now it is true that if you were to watch any high level tournament play of Street Fighter, you would not see any of these characters spamming as much.  Perhaps you'd see the famous Daigo Umehara using Ryu's Hadoken a lot, but this adds to my point.  Daigo is known for the masterful use of the Hadoken, and you will constantly see them in one of his matches, but this "spamming" is not senseless.  It's winning him a match.  He is not constantly using the fireball to troll, but because it is his strategy.  It works.  It forces his opponents to test their own knowledge of the game.  If they cannot figure it out, he has proven himself the dominant one in the match and deserves the win.  If they do, his gameplay MUST change accordingly. 

One thing to note is that his high-level tournament grade competitors force him to stop "spamming" with their own masterful maneuvering and overall play -- so much so that they can beat his wall of fireballs.  This is why you would not see as much spamming in their games as opposed to the low level matches of All-Stars where people seemingly ONLY know how to spam.  Because skilled players understand the game, they have figured out how to not only defend against these tactics, but also utilize effective counter attacks, making repetitive use of a single move incredibly dangerous.  Because instead of quitting the game and raging, they embraced their desire to win and took the time to understand the game.  Not just the character they liked to play, but everything about it.  They chose to learn about every character's movelist, how to punish and avoid every character's move, the system mechanics regarding what you can do when you're knocked down, what to do if you're thrown, what you can do when you block certain moves.  They chose to accept and understand, which has proven to be greatly in their favor.

You may be thinking, "Rossome, you silly goose.  Street Fighter is like a legitimate fighting game.  This is PlayStation SmashStar Brothers!  It's for the lulz."  I'm sure that many others will join me in believing that this game has potential to be just as competitive and "legitimate" as something like Street Fighter, or Skullgirls, or Marvel vs. Capcom, or Persona 4 Arena, or Tekken.  However, this will take time.  It takes time to understand the game.  It takes time to flesh out character strategies.  It takes time to create effective counter strategies.  But most importantly, it requires the community to embrace it as the true fighting game it is.

With this acceptance, you may begin to notice some similarities with other fighting games.  Jak's arsenal of projectiles can be used much like Ryu's Hadoken.  Drake's barrels can protect him just like Guile's Sonic Boom.  The extended range of Ratchet's grab likens him to Zangief.  Raiden's speed and maneuverability makes him similar to Vega, but this includes the weakness to ranged attacks.

I know it will be a struggle for some, especially if you're just now starting to realize that this game you want to be good at is a lot deeper than you expected, and will thus require a lot more training and studying than you had planned for.  But I implore you to not give up.

I remember when I first started getting into fighting games and playing Marvel vs Capcom 3, I used to be DISGUSTED with Dante players who constantly used Helm Breaker (the move where he starts in the air suddenly zips downward to slam his sword on the ground).  The move was so fast, had so much priority, and covered a good range.  Worst of all, they were able to convert this one move into a full combo that earned them at least one full meter and easily ended in one of his Hyper combos for big damage.

It got to the point where I was clenching my fists and punching pillows because I felt like that move was so overpowered.  I wanted to pull my hair out!  Despite the intense frustration and rage building up within, one thing kept me going:

The determination to win.

Instead of praying for a patch or that the character would be banned in tournaments or something like that, I accepted it.  Dantes' Helm Breaker, or Weskers' fast teleports, or Sentinels' high damage output, or Wolverines' dive kicks -- I accepted it for what it was.  I accepted that these characters had powerful strengths and people who wanted to win played to those strengths.  It was tough learning what these strengths were, but over time, I definitely did learn what they were.  And with knowledge comes potential.

Using that knowledge I was able to predict what moves my opponent wanted to do and prepare a counterattack.  Sometimes the best option would be to block and punish while they were stuck in recovery animations.  Sometimes the best option was to dodge and punish.  Other times the best idea was just to stay away altogether, but dominate with ranged attacks.  With this knowledge, I was able to read my opponents attacks and destroy the competition with my (at the time low-mid tier) Spider-Man, even winning a couple of local tournaments and getting higher placements in other competitions.

What I want you to walk away with after reading this is that you CAN be better than that jerk who is just running away and using Forward + Triangle with Radec.  If you work hard enough you will see the glaring flaws in the strategy of someone who is using just one or two moves repeatedly.  You will notice how just taking a couple of seconds to jump and air-dodge will open up a 3 minute **bleep** whooping on your opponent.  If you take a step back and just analyze what's happening on the screen, you will find that the almighty Raiden who spams his forward square is drastically limited when fighting someone who keeps jumping in the air.  If you can just clear your head for a moment, you will realize that although Fat Princess has powerful Air-to-Ground tactics, she doesn't really have many answers to someone who jumps up and joins her in the sky.

As more and more of the community realizes that spamming is only an effective strategy when used on low-level players, we will begin to see it less and less.  Every character has a weakness and all it takes is the earnest effort to find it and exploit it.  If you truly want to win, you must accept where your own weaknesses are and work to overcome them. 

Do not give up the fight, my fellow All-Stars.  With proper effort will come rewards.  Keep trying.  Keep practicing.  Keep learning.

[Also, thank you to everyone to actually took the time to read this whole thing.]

If you'd like to further better yourself as a fighting gamer, I highly recommend you read these links provided by DarkErazor.

Tips on Becoming a Better Player - Part 1: How Losing Helps You Get Better
Tips on Becoming a Better Player - Part 2: Online vs. Offline Tournaments

Written by the testyourmight.com moderator, Juggs, this expansive guide provides further insight and truths into what it takes to feed the fighting game beast within -- focusing on topics such as how to control your emotions, constantly seeking out better players, how online play/rank is generally arbitrary, and how offline tournaments are the best form of training.

____________________________________________________________
http://community.us.playstation.com/t5/PlayStation-All-Stars-Battle/Spamming-Or-Effective-Strategy-An-Opinion-Essay/td-p/39087897

Complain Less. Learn more.
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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy?

Dec 16, 2012

Rossome wrote:

Spam.  I love it.  Especially when it's lightly fried with eggs and rice.  Yum.
Spam

But srsly:  To spam moves is, as most of us already know, to constantly repeat a move.  Spamming moves is obviously a greatly despised tactic here on the forums, but who is to blame when this happens?  The person repeating the move over and over again?  Or the people who keep getting hit by it?

Every fighting game has an intentionally varied cast of characters who have strengths and weaknesses.  Let's assume for a bit that everyone wants to win.  Not just mess around and have fun, but win.  Would it not make sense to utilize a strength of your chosen character and exploit the weakness of your opponent to achieve victory?

Let's take Street Fighter, for example -- the most world renowned competitive fighting game.  Ryu has his Hadoken to keep opponents away and build up chip damage.  Guile's best feature of his light Sonic Boom is that he can actually move with it and cover his next attack.  Vega's claw gives him a very long reach which he can use quickly damage and interrupt an opponent from range.  Balrog is another character with long reach but also many special moves that move him forward, allowing him to pressure an opponent into a corner where they are forced to deal with his mix-ups.

Now it is true that if you were to watch any high level tournament play of Street Fighter, you would not see any of these characters spamming as much.  Perhaps you'd see the famous Daigo Umehara using Ryu's Hadoken a lot, but this adds to my point.  Daigo is known for the masterful use of the Hadoken, and you will constantly see them in one of his matches, but this "spamming" is not senseless.  It's winning him a match.  He is not constantly using the fireball to troll, but because it is his strategy.  It works.  It forces his opponents to test their own knowledge of the game.  If they cannot figure it out, he has proven himself the dominant one in the match and deserves the win.  If they do, his gameplay MUST change accordingly. 

One thing to note is that his high-level tournament grade competitors force him to stop "spamming" with their own masterful maneuvering and overall play -- so much so that they can beat his wall of fireballs.  This is why you would not see as much spamming in their games as opposed to the low level matches of All-Stars where people seemingly ONLY know how to spam.  Because skilled players understand the game, they have figured out how to not only defend against these tactics, but also utilize effective counter attacks, making repetitive use of a single move incredibly dangerous.  Because instead of quitting the game and raging, they embraced their desire to win and took the time to understand the game.  Not just the character they liked to play, but everything about it.  They chose to learn about every character's movelist, how to punish and avoid every character's move, the system mechanics regarding what you can do when you're knocked down, what to do if you're thrown, what you can do when you block certain moves.  They chose to accept and understand, which has proven to be greatly in their favor.

You may be thinking, "Rossome, you silly goose.  Street Fighter is like a legitimate fighting game.  This is PlayStation SmashStar Brothers!  It's for the lulz."  I'm sure that many others will join me in believing that this game has potential to be just as competitive and "legitimate" as something like Street Fighter, or Skullgirls, or Marvel vs. Capcom, or Persona 4 Arena, or Tekken.  However, this will take time.  It takes time to understand the game.  It takes time to flesh out character strategies.  It takes time to create effective counter strategies.  But most importantly, it requires the community to embrace it as the true fighting game it is.

With this acceptance, you may begin to notice some similarities with other fighting games.  Jak's arsenal of projectiles can be used much like Ryu's Hadoken.  Drake's barrels can protect him just like Guile's Sonic Boom.  The extended range of Ratchet's grab likens him to Zangief.  Raiden's speed and maneuverability makes him similar to Vega, but this includes the weakness to ranged attacks.

I know it will be a struggle for some, especially if you're just now starting to realize that this game you want to be good at is a lot deeper than you expected, and will thus require a lot more training and studying than you had planned for.  But I implore you to not give up.

I remember when I first started getting into fighting games and playing Marvel vs Capcom 3, I used to be DISGUSTED with Dante players who constantly used Helm Breaker (the move where he starts in the air suddenly zips downward to slam his sword on the ground).  The move was so fast, had so much priority, and covered a good range.  Worst of all, they were able to convert this one move into a full combo that earned them at least one full meter and easily ended in one of his Hyper combos for big damage.

It got to the point where I was clenching my fists and punching pillows because I felt like that move was so overpowered.  I wanted to pull my hair out!  Despite the intense frustration and rage building up within, one thing kept me going:

The determination to win.

Instead of praying for a patch or that the character would be banned in tournaments or something like that, I accepted it.  Dantes' Helm Breaker, or Weskers' fast teleports, or Sentinels' high damage output, or Wolverines' dive kicks -- I accepted it for what it was.  I accepted that these characters had powerful strengths and people who wanted to win played to those strengths.  It was tough learning what these strengths were, but over time, I definitely did learn what they were.  And with knowledge comes potential.

Using that knowledge I was able to predict what moves my opponent wanted to do and prepare a counterattack.  Sometimes the best option would be to block and punish while they were stuck in recovery animations.  Sometimes the best option was to dodge and punish.  Other times the best idea was just to stay away altogether, but dominate with ranged attacks.  With this knowledge, I was able to read my opponents attacks and destroy the competition with my (at the time low-mid tier) Spider-Man, even winning a couple of local tournaments and getting higher placements in other competitions.

What I want you to walk away with after reading this is that you CAN be better than that jerk who is just running away and using Forward + Triangle with Radec.  If you work hard enough you will see the glaring flaws in the strategy of someone who using just one or two moves repeatedly.  You will notice how just taking a couple of seconds to jump and air-dodge will open up a 3 minute **bleep** whooping on your opponent.  If you take a step back and just analyze what's happening on the screen, you will find that the almighty Raiden who spams his forward square is drastically limited when fighting someone who keeps jumping in the air.  If you can just clear your head for a moment, you will realize that although Fat Princess has powerful Air-to-Ground tactics, she doesn't really have many answers to someone who jumps up and joins her in the sky.

As more and more of the community realizes that spamming is only an effective strategy when used on low-level players, we will begin to see it less and less.  Every character has a weakness and all it takes is the earnest effort to find it and exploit it.  If you truly want to win, you must accept where your own weaknesses are and work to overcome them. 

Do not give up the fight, my fellow All-Stars.  With proper effort will come rewards.  Keep trying.  Keep practicing.  Keep learning.

[Also, thank you to everyone to actually took the time to read this whole thing.]


fatprincess.png

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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy?

Dec 17, 2012

seems legit.

 

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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy?

Dec 17, 2012
Kudos.
__________________________________________________________

1/6/2013 - Defeated the #1 player in the World in a Ranked Match.

Currently maining: Parappa

Future mains: Zeus, Issac
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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy? (An Opinion Essay)

Dec 17, 2012

my responce:

 

spamming is an underhanded, skill-less trick. those who spam ruin the game and the expeirences of those who play with/against them. its cheap, and leaves you open. most people that spam dont have a back up plan and therefor lose when they are confronted head on. Spam is best left at the supermarkets

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Fender Bender
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy?

Dec 17, 2012

Ari_Ownx wrote:

Rossome wrote:

Spam.  I love it.  Especially when it's lightly fried with eggs and rice.  Yum.
Spam

But srsly:  To spam moves is, as most of us already know, to constantly repeat a move.  Spamming moves is obviously a greatly despised tactic here on the forums, but who is to blame when this happens?  The person repeating the move over and over again?  Or the people who keep getting hit by it?

Every fighting game has an intentionally varied cast of characters who have strengths and weaknesses.  Let's assume for a bit that everyone wants to win.  Not just mess around and have fun, but win.  Would it not make sense to utilize a strength of your chosen character and exploit the weakness of your opponent to achieve victory?

Let's take Street Fighter, for example -- the most world renowned competitive fighting game.  Ryu has his Hadoken to keep opponents away and build up chip damage.  Guile's best feature of his light Sonic Boom is that he can actually move with it and cover his next attack.  Vega's claw gives him a very long reach which he can use quickly damage and interrupt an opponent from range.  Balrog is another character with long reach but also many special moves that move him forward, allowing him to pressure an opponent into a corner where they are forced to deal with his mix-ups.

Now it is true that if you were to watch any high level tournament play of Street Fighter, you would not see any of these characters spamming as much.  Perhaps you'd see the famous Daigo Umehara using Ryu's Hadoken a lot, but this adds to my point.  Daigo is known for the masterful use of the Hadoken, and you will constantly see them in one of his matches, but this "spamming" is not senseless.  It's winning him a match.  He is not constantly using the fireball to troll, but because it is his strategy.  It works.  It forces his opponents to test their own knowledge of the game.  If they cannot figure it out, he has proven himself the dominant one in the match and deserves the win.  If they do, his gameplay MUST change accordingly. 

One thing to note is that his high-level tournament grade competitors force him to stop "spamming" with their own masterful maneuvering and overall play -- so much so that they can beat his wall of fireballs.  This is why you would not see as much spamming in their games as opposed to the low level matches of All-Stars where people seemingly ONLY know how to spam.  Because skilled players understand the game, they have figured out how to not only defend against these tactics, but also utilize effective counter attacks, making repetitive use of a single move incredibly dangerous.  Because instead of quitting the game and raging, they embraced their desire to win and took the time to understand the game.  Not just the character they liked to play, but everything about it.  They chose to learn about every character's movelist, how to punish and avoid every character's move, the system mechanics regarding what you can do when you're knocked down, what to do if you're thrown, what you can do when you block certain moves.  They chose to accept and understand, which has proven to be greatly in their favor.

You may be thinking, "Rossome, you silly goose.  Street Fighter is like a legitimate fighting game.  This is PlayStation SmashStar Brothers!  It's for the lulz."  I'm sure that many others will join me in believing that this game has potential to be just as competitive and "legitimate" as something like Street Fighter, or Skullgirls, or Marvel vs. Capcom, or Persona 4 Arena, or Tekken.  However, this will take time.  It takes time to understand the game.  It takes time to flesh out character strategies.  It takes time to create effective counter strategies.  But most importantly, it requires the community to embrace it as the true fighting game it is.

With this acceptance, you may begin to notice some similarities with other fighting games.  Jak's arsenal of projectiles can be used much like Ryu's Hadoken.  Drake's barrels can protect him just like Guile's Sonic Boom.  The extended range of Ratchet's grab likens him to Zangief.  Raiden's speed and maneuverability makes him similar to Vega, but this includes the weakness to ranged attacks.

I know it will be a struggle for some, especially if you're just now starting to realize that this game you want to be good at is a lot deeper than you expected, and will thus require a lot more training and studying than you had planned for.  But I implore you to not give up.

I remember when I first started getting into fighting games and playing Marvel vs Capcom 3, I used to be DISGUSTED with Dante players who constantly used Helm Breaker (the move where he starts in the air suddenly zips downward to slam his sword on the ground).  The move was so fast, had so much priority, and covered a good range.  Worst of all, they were able to convert this one move into a full combo that earned them at least one full meter and easily ended in one of his Hyper combos for big damage.

It got to the point where I was clenching my fists and punching pillows because I felt like that move was so overpowered.  I wanted to pull my hair out!  Despite the intense frustration and rage building up within, one thing kept me going:

The determination to win.

Instead of praying for a patch or that the character would be banned in tournaments or something like that, I accepted it.  Dantes' Helm Breaker, or Weskers' fast teleports, or Sentinels' high damage output, or Wolverines' dive kicks -- I accepted it for what it was.  I accepted that these characters had powerful strengths and people who wanted to win played to those strengths.  It was tough learning what these strengths were, but over time, I definitely did learn what they were.  And with knowledge comes potential.

Using that knowledge I was able to predict what moves my opponent wanted to do and prepare a counterattack.  Sometimes the best option would be to block and punish while they were stuck in recovery animations.  Sometimes the best option was to dodge and punish.  Other times the best idea was just to stay away altogether, but dominate with ranged attacks.  With this knowledge, I was able to read my opponents attacks and destroy the competition with my (at the time low-mid tier) Spider-Man, even winning a couple of local tournaments and getting higher placements in other competitions.

What I want you to walk away with after reading this is that you CAN be better than that jerk who is just running away and using Forward + Triangle with Radec.  If you work hard enough you will see the glaring flaws in the strategy of someone who using just one or two moves repeatedly.  You will notice how just taking a couple of seconds to jump and air-dodge will open up a 3 minute **bleep** whooping on your opponent.  If you take a step back and just analyze what's happening on the screen, you will find that the almighty Raiden who spams his forward square is drastically limited when fighting someone who keeps jumping in the air.  If you can just clear your head for a moment, you will realize that although Fat Princess has powerful Air-to-Ground tactics, she doesn't really have many answers to someone who jumps up and joins her in the sky.

As more and more of the community realizes that spamming is only an effective strategy when used on low-level players, we will begin to see it less and less.  Every character has a weakness and all it takes is the earnest effort to find it and exploit it.  If you truly want to win, you must accept where your own weaknesses are and work to overcome them. 

Do not give up the fight, my fellow All-Stars.  With proper effort will come rewards.  Keep trying.  Keep practicing.  Keep learning.

[Also, thank you to everyone to actually took the time to read this whole thing.]


fatprincess.png


i **bleep** loled when i saw her face

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First Son
Registered: 12/16/2012
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy? (An Opinion Essay)

Dec 17, 2012
Good big **bleep** Essay. I myself come from the street fighter 4 ae, been playing 2 years. I see at every character as different match up that I have to think how to beat it, you can punish most of the stuff on block in this game.

I dont think that this game is as deep as SF games but it sure is alot deeper than the eye sees. When you learn to punish, bait and read, that's where the fun begins Smiley Wink
And something that just came to my mind, it will get alot deeper when people's gonna start doing team setups in to supers
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Uncharted Territory
Registered: 08/26/2009
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy? (An Opinion Essay)

Dec 17, 2012
I hate swine
"Say Pam, ever hung from a ceiling fan while your partner sat on a paint mixer"
 photo lordvv-1.gifVegeta GIF photo vegeta.gif
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Fender Bender
Registered: 01/10/2009
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy? (An Opinion Essay)

Dec 17, 2012
Good read. I agree completely. Spamming is due to a characters strengths. I use the term bread and butter attack. If it's you're only strategy, however, you become predictable and thus easy to counter/punish. It's the people who don't know how to do so that complain.
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Lombax Warrior
Registered: 11/11/2012
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Re: Spamming? Or Effective Strategy? (An Opinion Essay)

Dec 17, 2012

mmm, i think spam kinda depends on the character matchups. in a 2v2 match against 2 drakes who spam ak and barrels, if ur teammate has died and ur a close-ranged character, ur pretty much screwed with barrels and ak's from both sides. However, if ur a character like sackboy, you have the option of the fan or the bounce pad to shoot back those attacks, or your own ranged ones to shoot back.

 

So in short, in some matchups its fine, others, not so much

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