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Splicer
Registered: 01/21/2010
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 1, 2010

Something to refute is the consequences of aggression that stems from cometing in a game (competition is against generated in the game and human controlled competitors). Agression can be caused by any type of competition just as violence can stem from any form of input (media and real life interaction).

The arguments against are that parents should read ratings and limit game time. An argument against that is that parents don't know what other players in games say to their kids (antagonizing remarks). Parents often don't have the time to watch their kid play and know if a mildly violent or suggestive game will be enough to cause an effect. For instance, like someone said, mario could be seen as bad. Mario does have to "kill" enemies. Role playing like others are those enemies could be considered a concern (imo a weak one).

 

Why video games aren't a bigger concern: people can antagonize each other in schools, other forms of media can stimulate an urge to role-play. Cartoons do have some violence.

One danger with parents would be that they don't think violent video games could cause a problem in their child. I think this is the major one: not knowing how the game affects the individual child, just like they don't know how school and peer pressure are affecting their child. Children don't express everything.

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Gaming Beast
Registered: 04/09/2009
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 1, 2010

I agree with everyone here saying that children need to learn the difference between reality and video games. I've been playing games since I was about 2, all the way to my age now, 13. I was raised to know the difference between a fake world, and the real world, and know what I can and can't do in it.

 

I know in a fake world, I can do anything I want, because it's, well, fake! I can beat people up, jump off buildings, and join the army, without feeling remorse, pain, or leaving my couch, respectively. I know that God won't hold it against me, because these aren't his creatures, and they're just pixels.

 

But look at the media, they say that Violence in video games lead to violence in real life. The reason they say that? Easy targets. Look at Grand Theft Auto 4. Killing, Car-Jacking, Illegal Drugs, etc. The media looks at these types of games, and think, "Oh, well if kids do this in real life after playing this game, the game MUST be the influence!!!" No. Not always the case.

 

If a video game teaches a kid anything, it's self defense, at least in my opinion. Example:

 

In Call of Duty 4, if you get attacked by a dog, you break it's neck. Did that make me wanna break a dog's neck? No. Did it teach me what to do if I was pinned by a Dog? Yes! If I got attacked by a dog the day before playing Call of Duty, I might have been killed, or badly injured, because I would kick and flail and push.

 

But, I'm rambling now, I think the parents are to blame if a child copies something in a video game. They must not have taught the child the difference between reality and a fake world, or the child has mental issues.

 

Hope this helps!

# 1 Zelda fan.

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Big Daddy
Registered: 08/23/2001
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 1, 2010
I'd be researching anything Jack Thompson if I were you

He was an extremist activist for banning violent video games. He's since lost his Florida Bar license I believe. But reading articles by him and about him will surely point you toward articles that show why Jack Thomson is wrong.
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Monster Hunter
Registered: 12/30/2009
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 1, 2010
Its all bull. Everyone I work with plays violent video games on a daily basis. We have weekly tournements in Socom Mortal Kombat Tekken and Street Fighter. Noone I work with has ever decided to pick up a gun and start shooting people or tried to rip someones arms off. Violence in Video Games does not create violence in people
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Keyblade Wielder
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 1, 2010

I would say to a degree they definitely do cause violent behavior. Then again you have to also put media into that same category. You have to remember everyone is impressionable, but kids are the most vulnerable to these things.

 

I know as a fact when I was like 10/11 me and my brother would throw in a WWF game, play for a bit and then go pick a character and go beat the **bleep** out of each other in the bedroom. Same with Pokemon in elementary school, pick a pokemon and starting fighting each other. Yeah most of the time it's just kids feeding their imagination, but it is bound to go too far sometimes. Same with almost every shooter game. If a kid is playing a game and is having a good time doing it, once he stops playing he is still going to want that rush of doing whatever he was doing in the game. Going from having fun to no fun is hard for kids, and they need to express themselves somehow, and if that means throwing the neighbor into an arm bar he is going to do it.

 

As for the parents, kids want to do things they know they aren't allowed to do. They are kids, blaming parents is just as bad. Are any of you guys parents? Everyone wants to think they will be the perfect parent, but that stuff is hard. If kids are having fun fighting each other and their parents punish them. They are just going to want to do it more. Playing with fire for example, I was fascinated by lighting things on fire when I was kid, parents always gave me **bleep** and told me I could really hurt someone/etc but I continued to do it because knowing I wasn't allowed made it so much better. Eventually I did learn when I almost burned my shed down and stopped right away.


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Big Daddy
Registered: 12/02/2005
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 1, 2010

Here is an article I had published on that same topic with the same belief (they do not cause violence).  I doubt you'd be able to use it as a source because it's not "scholarly," but feel free to read through it anyway to obtain some additional ideas and thoughts on the matter.  Smiley Happy

 

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1413795/the_educational_value_in_video_games.html?cat=19 

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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 2, 2010
Violence is caused by the child's upbringing. For example, my cousin was playing GTA IV on my ps3 at the age of 9. His parents allowed it, and it hasn't affected him in any way. In a way, it is the parent's faults for not teaching them the difference between right and wrong. These kids which cause violence and blaming it on a video game, have not been taught properly or have mental issues.
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Uncharted Territory
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 2, 2010

Well here's games vs violence.

 

Video games do not cause violence exept in children under the age of about 10. This is usually because their differentiation between right/wrong real/imaginary is still milky. They still hold onto common things such as Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy. It has been proven in people above that age level video games DECREASE violence in people by allowing a visually stimulating  release of tension and anger. Not only does it lower your proneness to violence it stimulates your eyes, actually helping them. It is a major source of hand eye coordination development.

 

Someone against video games with violence may say that they put ideas into peoples head that it's ok to perform such acts as murder, robbery, or whatever. But this is just a scapegoat for the person and/or the parents. The fault is the parents and the child, not the game.

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Sackboy
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 2, 2010
Stop being lasey go find it yourself dude.
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Lombax Warrior
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Re: Video Games, Violence and Children.

Feb 2, 2010

I wrote this for my last college semster hope this helps you out.

 

 Video Games Are Not the Answer

As society begins to emerge into a new discovery of life, new ideas as well as the past decade, technology has made easier and safer ways to make life straightforward. The media has made obscure concerns between superior righteousness.  Should franchise video game companies be held responsible for legal liability by regulation towards consumers that develop negative effects of behaviors as a result?

There have been numerous comments on how video games may cause bad effects on children who tend to play violent mature rated games purchased by the legal guardian. According to the NYVPRC, 74% of families who own video game equipment as to the average video gamers spending 53 minutes per day playing, while 48% of the parents are supervising as to 88% supervising while watching television. The legal guardian is still held responsible for purchasing a mature rated game. If the child where to play the game as often, the parent guardian should be supervising at all times. The legal guardian should also know when to mute inappropriate messages or images when the child is playing. Taking action is necessary when the child refuses to have a good behavior. Discipline must be taught towards other priorities that should be held along the parent guardian’s responsibility. A GameStop employee named Doug, who I had an interview with, also stated that each employee gives brief information about each game they sell. It’s up to the parents who are responsible watching their children that purchase mature games. The GameStop employee suggests it is not a good idea for the child to play mature games yet it is still held by the parents who are responsible. When purchasing a game, parents should be more informed about deciding right from wrong then simply just giving their child money for them to go up to a cash register as their guardian is waiting to park the car outside, then coming in buying the game without even looking.

According to Microsoft’s healthy gaming guide, taking brakes is a great way to relax your body from frequent periods of time that also avoids Musculoskeletal and long lasting side effects. For instance, after sitting in front of a TV for a period of time, take a break while standing up is a good way to keeping your body stable as to sitting in one position. Another great way of taking a break is by switching controllers such as using a controller pad other than using a hand controller. This makes physical activity more motivated then being static. Being healthy is an important value at the same time as exercising, but also towards the right food and getting enough sleep. Being in shape makes exhaustion less determining by having flexibility and being active. Legal guardians should also watch their children for sugary foods that lead to health problems. Bad food and poor diets can cause harmful effects such as the lack of losing muscles and heart attacks. Bad food and poor diets can also lead to a poor gaming by having great amount of sugar that can cause large effects mentally and physically. Playing while pressing and holding a game controller to long can result to injuries and discomfort as Microsoft’s healthy gaming guide states; playing lightly can result to a likely pain or injury.

Not only can video games include bad effects and good effects to consumers, but to video game companies as well. The National Institute on Media and the Family had found positive and negative effects of video game played by children. For instance, video games can introduce children to information and technology. As of the late 70’s, video games were just pixels and 8-bit music; graphics were nothing but big blocks. Comparing to today, an entry on Wikipedia explains about the history of video games that has made a large advancement towards computer technology. This gives children some knowledge of the past and present such as a third party video game developer Activision that existed in the 70’s is still present in today. Activison has currently made their latest video game called Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 that has outstanding technology improvements comparing to their 97’s game called Quake 4. Video games can also provide problem solving and logic that can be educational to children depending on the video game, many other video game companies such as Leap Frog and VTech provide educational video games that are E for everyone according to the ESRB ratings.

Video games can also include bad effects as a technology. Most games are filled with violence that embraces killing, shooting, stabbing with weapons. Most of these games also take place in a violent environment. Studies found by National Institute on Media and the Family while playing these games, taking part as a violent act may cause aggression in behavior that is less likely than watching television. Studies also concluded that first person shooter games would be more likely to increase violence by having motivation of striving for survival of the fittest.  Stated by Tom in Teaching Kids to kill, a 15 year old boy Carneal killed 8 innocents in Columbine High School after shooting five shots at the head and 3 shots in the chest. Carneal had taken practice at his very own home playing a shooting arcade game as well as practicing with a real gun and live ammunition. Ironically Tom also states that the military, such as the Marine Corp, uses a simulator such as a video game; by taking violence from an artificial environment and placing the simulated reactions that result to the increase of accuracy that is concluded as the same result from a video game. Tom also states that 90 percent of the accuracy was also increased during the Vietnam War by using human shaped targets resolving the same practice used as Carneal did. Violent games require less creativity and thought as to an interactive game called Little Big Planet published by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe. Creativeness is a big roll while the violent level is lower than a shooter game that makes the game E for everyone followed by the ESRB ratings. Such games as to the series of Dance Dance Revolution developed by Konami has become a great hit from its dance pad controller that allows users to move around the floor rather than sitting at one spot. While playing, the player must go though tasks that dramatically becomes challenging while the game level becomes difficult to expert mode. The game has become popular due to its interactive dance pad and constant movement that embraces a few charitable organizations to raise money such as the cure for cancer or educational needs as Christine stated in Fitness Matters.

Video games has also developed gamers with disabilities creating new ways to interact with video games that require physical measures such as holding and reaching buttons while the concern is still unaware with video game system developers. A possibility of the cause is the lack of manufactures that not only design several products, but lack the profit of balancing personal business interest. Video game companies such as Nintendo may have over-looked their latest motion control technology when productions  may have lost funds to produce mass productions of products that aid the disabled when the gaming population is roughly about ten to twenty percent stated by tk2012 from the Playstation Off-Topic Discussion. Although there have been companies that are not followed by rules and regulation with copyrighted material, these companies still produce products that may not look appealing, however functions as a aid that helps other disabled gamers whiling adapting to a video game also stated by tk2012.

Video games may not be straight forward to parents that argue, yet a few people have comment from what they think about parents that argue about video games in general.  I have interviewed two of my best friends Dan Smith and Elica Park. My first question to Dan was: “What do you have to say about parents not being too responsible for their children who are being misleading?” and he replied: “Well, parents can only do so much. They should of course try to follow the ESRB ratings.” He was suggesting that parents can possibility have too much responsibility with their daily tasks and by having to look over with their children, they can’t be too severe with everything else. Although following the ESRB by official standards that present the regulation is highly achievable with television advertisements and in store warnings before handling with video games, that is strongly recognizable. I then asked another question relating to the first question: “Do you still say that parents are responsible even if their child is doing poor in their education?” His reply was: “Do you mean that as in the kids are doing poor in school because they do not study and just play video games? Then yes. Games can be addicting, but in the end it's the parents fault for not telling them when to stop.” Video games should still be advised by parents that take role as part of a guardian, even if video games do attract attention away from education, it is still the parents control by having information such as report cards that show a result from evidence knowing if they should or shouldn’t leave the video games away.

I then asked the same similar questions to Elica and her reply was: “My answer is that they should not blame anything or anyone else for not being able to take care of their own children.” Understanding from stand point, video game companies are trying to manage products and produce as much as they can while exploring new technology whereas being cautious from dangers of leaving out the important regulations. I then asked another question: “Even if the guardian purchased a mature rated game for their children?” Her reply was: “The parents should be blamed for purchasing the mature game for their children. It's not like the company forced the parent to buy it or anything it was their choice so why are they blaming other people, other companies for the choices they made? So are you saying that all violent video games should be banished from this world?  It’s about entertainment you can’t get rid of every entertainment that somebody decides as offensive usually it’s the adolescent children that are greatly influenced  therefore, parents should take responsibility for the age that their children start playing M rated video games.” Buying a game for the children is a privilege, while the parent is acknowledging the reward; the children may have also suggested a game they wanted not knowing as it was a rated mature game. As a result, while playing a mature rated game, the children may have reacted as if confused or understanding for the first time while the guardian may be busy away from the children. The parent is still hold responsible while purchasing the game when the game company is only presenting the game to mature gamers as rated. The parent might realize the violence coming from the mature rated game that is not for children. The game company is only developing products as to a video game should be used for, the video game is pointed to the consumers as entertainment being provided while the parent taking the risk knowing the game is rated mature should be concluded that the game company is not held responsible.

 

While the media is still fighting for what’s right, comments from many consumers may have their own opinion if video game companies should be held responsible for negative effects of behaviors that develop from consumers. Making the right choice between satisfying the consumer and risking the concerns is part of the consumer’s responsibility. After acknowledging the product and regulations held part of the ESRB, only the consumer holds the integrity behind the acceptance of the purchase.

 

 

 Work Cited

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center. NYVPRC, 28 November 2009. Web. 28 Nov. 2009. <http://www.safeyouth.org/scripts/faq/mediaviolstats.asp>.

Smith, Dan. Personal interview. 28 Nov. 2009

Park, Elica. Personal interview. 28 Nov. 2009

Jeffery, Doug. Personal interview at a Gamestop. 20 Nov. 2009

Microsoft.  Healthy Gaming Guide. Microsoft Corporation, 03 November 2009. Web.  28 Nov. 2009. <http://www.xbox.com/en-ZA/support/xbox360/familysettings/healthygamingguide.htm>.

National Institute on Media and the Family.  Effects Of Video Game Playing On Children. NIMF, June 2009. Web. 28 Nov. 2009. <http://www.mediafamily.org/facts/facts_effect.shtml>.

History of video games. Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. 29 Nov. 2009. Web. 28 Nov. 2009.
< http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_video_games>.

tk2012. Weblog comment.  Accessibility for Disabled Players   . Playstation Forums Off-Topic Discussion.  22 Oct. 2009. Web. 28 Nov. 2009. <http://boardsus.playstation.com/playstation/board/message?board.id=offtopic&thread.id=2220086&view=b...>.
Ekeroth, Christine.  “Human Joystick”.  Fitness Matters. American Council on Exercise, Oct. Nov.  2007. Web. 28 Nov. 2009. <http://www.acefitness.org/cp/pdfs/FitnessMatters/Sept07.pdf>.

Neven, Tom. “Teaching Kids to Kill”.  Entertainment.  Americas Authority on Fitness, 2009. Web. 28 Nov. 2009. <http://www.focusonthefamily.com/entertainment/mediawise/media_awareness/teaching_kids_to_kill.aspx>.

 

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