Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
Reply
Jan 23 2011
By: ResidentZoidberg PlayStation MVP 2050 posts
Offline

100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

34 replies 3365 views Edited Jan 23, 2011

One-hundred games is quite a lot, but also so few, in the grand scheme of things, when looking back at the thousands of other games that have convinced us, as PlayStation gamers, to try or buy over these past few generations. Exceedingly tantalizing are the gaming miracles lining up our memory banks, building on a history that continues to increase and expand – especially in light of 2011’s already-packed spring release calendar. We, the MVPs of the PlayStation.com forum, came together in an attempt to decide which titles in the PlayStation’s history were the most memorable, innovative, fun, and the absolute best.

Compiling this riverbank of data for months at a time wasn’t easy (credit GrayGargoyle for most of that legwork), but it was a labor of love. The MVPs, collectively, compiled lists of our own favorite games, and then consolidated all of the lists via a complex scoring system. The list that follows is the result. While by no means completely comprehensive, the list is a diverse and varied representation of some of our favorite PlayStation titles over the last three gaming generations, complete with anecdotal excerpts by the people that loved them.

Whether you’re chomping at the bit to correct our inaccurate rankings of your favorite titles, ready to harangue us for leaving out the best game ever, or merely want to chat about how your favorites compare or about the MVPs’ colorful excerpts, enjoy! So, without further ado, we’d like to present to you all The MVP Top 100 PlayStation Games of All Time!

100. Shadow Hearts: Covenant

Publisher: Midway Games

Developer: Nautilus

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 27, 2004

A role-playing game published by Midway, Nautilus is the developer who brought this PlayStation 2 turn-based RPG to life. Shadow Hearts: Covenant is the second entry in the franchise, which follows a plot concerning demons, World War I, and a town refusing its own destruction. Shadow Hearts: Covenant received much fanfare in its day, making that the reason why it's found a placement here on our MVP list. -GrayGargoyle

99. Soulcalibur II

Publisher: Namco

Developer: Project Soul

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: August 26, 2003

Set 4 years after the end of Soulcalibur, Soulcalibur II continues the tale of the struggle between good and evil. Nightmare had managed to begin to regain his sanity and had set off to atone for the sins he committed. However, Soul Edge has taken over his body once again, and he now is set on fully restoring the sword. This installment introduces characters such as Cassandra, Talim, Raphael, and Yun-Seong, and features a special guest appearance from Tekken's Heihachi Mishima. Soulcalibur II is a fantastic fighter, and is the highest rated Soulcalibur title on the PlayStation family of consoles/handhelds. -Weidleface

98. Resident Evil
Publisher: Capcom
Developer: Capcom
Platform: PlayStation
Release: March 30, 1996

I knew of Resident Evil before it was released, yet I never actually became very intrigued by the game up until a friend explained to me of its horrifying greatness. Resident Evil is the reason why horror games became mainstream like most genres these days. Before this, Alone in the Dark for the PC may have started the genre, but it was Resident Evil that really dug out all of the scary goodness into the open for all to witness. You could even say that Resident Evil was the first horror game of its kind for consoles. In a 3D world, you had the awkward control setup to get used to, and then all of the shock surprises with grotesque zombies stumbling toward you, killer dogs leaping through windows, mutant spiders spitting acid from a distance, and even boss creatures, such as an enormous snake and a twenty-foot-tall manlike Tyrant. Killing creatures was scary and fun, as you had to solve mind-bending riddles, in addition to the nifty guns from the shotgun to the bazooka. Eerily masterful sights and sounds were also factors in making this game an enchanting collaboration for which all-future horror entries would base their game mechanics off of. -GrayGargoyle

97. Klonoa 2: Lunatea's Veil

Publisher: Namco

Developer: Namco

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: July 24, 2001

Klonoa 2: Lunatea’s Veil remains one of the PlayStation 2’s most underrated platformers. As the platforming genre pushed forward into full 3D, Klonoa 2 dared to push the limits of what platformers were becoming, respecting the genre’s roots with its two-dimensional setting, but still pushing its contemporaries with a depth of the third-dimension. Klonoa 2’s two-and-a-half dimensions coupled a charming adventure with exciting characters, making it a game you probably haven’t played, but really should. -GoodLuckSaturday

96. Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2
Publisher: Activision
Developer: Neversoft Entertainment
Platform: PlayStation
Release: September 20, 2000

I did own the original Tony Hawk before I ever bought the second one. I had the first game only because I won it. I never really played the game, only because I couldn't figure out how. Adapting to the Tony Hawk's Pro Skater skating system was a whole other world for me in gameplay advancements. The reason that I bought the second game was because it had just arrived in stores, and spontaneity struck. My friends were interested in the game, and it gave us all something to do. It was after days and weeks of practice with them that I'd gradually learn exactly how to skate in third-person. Then, it was mind-blowing. I was grinding, pulling off spins, wall riding, and basically flying all over the place. Loads of challenges to enact in two-minute rounds, good 3D graphics (for back then), and possibly the best non-game-related music soundtrack to appear in a video game made Tony Hawk 2 a dream come true. -GrayGargoyle

95. Dissidia Final Fantasy

Publisher: Square Enix

Developer: Square Enix

Platform: PlayStation Portable

Release: August 25, 2009

Dissidia: Final Fantasy was everything fans wanted: a fighting game comprised of Final Fantasy characters. Some were skeptical as to how the game would, in a word, work; simply put, the game played much like a Kingdom Hearts title, which was already a recipe for success from the start. The character roster was slightly disappointing, seeing as they were only the hero and villain from each game up to Final Fantasy X (plus two additional characters; one from Final Fantasy XI and another from Final Fantasy XII). Many fan favorites were left out, most popularly, Auron from Final Fantasy X. Regardless, no one could deny that Dissidia: Final Fantasy was entertaining, addicting, and action-packed, making it a go-to game for many gamers. -DAXRULZ

94. Jeanne d'Arc

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Level-5

Platform: PlayStation Portable

Release: August 21, 2007

Level-5’s Jeanne d’Arc not only gave portable gamers a balanced and rewarding strategy-RPG to take on the go, but it helped solidify Level-5 as one of the genre’s premier developers as they took on the familiar tale of Joan of Arc’s affliction. In their first attempt, the company created a high quality SRPG, featuring a deep and fast-paced system that makes it a perfect introduction for beginners with enough depth to give seasoned vets a run worth being impressed with. -GoodLuckSaturday

93. Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Sucker Punch

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 24, 2002

The first entry into the Sly series pits life-long friends Bentley, Murray, and Sly against Clockwerk and his minions, a gang of evil individuals intent on destroying the Cooper legacy along with their master's help. The "Fiendish Five," as they are called, take the Thievius Raccoonus, a book detailing the secrets, methods, and techniques of thieving passed down from generation to generation within the Cooper family, and split it into five portions. It is up to the three heroes to retrieve the missing pages and for Sly to return honor to his family's legacy. With his cunning, Bentley's intelligence, and Murray's driving and comedic relief, the three are more than ready to take on the challenge. -Argetlam

92. Resistance 2

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Insomniac Games

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: November 4, 2008

The release of Resistance: Fall of Man was a big step for Insomniac games as they dived into the world of first-person shooters, but I was overjoyed to see how well the game was put together. So it seemed inevitable that a sequel was on the horizon. Resistance 2 takes Resistance far further then I thought possible. Although the core gameplay felt rather similar, it was all new everywhere else. As you went battling against the Chimera, once again you learn far more about the characters in the world, which only attached you to them more. Resistance 2 was not only great because of the intense single-player in which you overcame huge new obstacles and new Chimera species. Topping that off, the game was also great for all it did with multiplayer. The co-op in Resistance 2 was, and still is, unparalleled. Featuring an amazing system, the multiplayer is hard to pull away from. Being able to fight increasingly harder enemies as you push forward with your team can be a real thrill. With the large amount of design time put forward, it shows. Random routes and waves make it only more unpredictable and fun. I could go on, but that may take a few more pages. Resistance 2 has gone far further than anyone would have expected, and boy do we love it. An amazing story, deep characters, insane cooperative and competitive multiplayer makes it an obvious addition to our top 100 games of all time. -Brrnout

91. Devil May Cry 4

Publisher: Capcom

Developer: Capcom Production Studio 1

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: February 5, 2008

Devil May Cry 4 is a step down from Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening (among certain individuals) but there are still plenty of things here to satisfy Devil May Cry video gamers as well as those who are looking for an introduction to the Devil May Cry series. For the first half of this video game players take control of Nero and for the last half of this video game players take control of Dante, the main protagonist from the Devil May Cry series. This video game opens itself up to newcomers by introducing some new characters to the mix and working on some of the themes that were introduced in previous Devil May Cry video games. A fair bit of character development and storyline progression involves the relationship between Nero and Kyrie, which is an interesting approach. Dante is back with quite a few of the attacks and styles that he acquired in Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening and the combat system has been tweaked (for better or for worse). Devil May Cry 4 is not the video game to pick up if players are looking for "the definitive Devil May Cry experience" but it is a quality action video game with a decent plot that should be able to satisfy individuals who are merely looking for a quality hack-and-slash video game with a relatively deep combat system. -SweetPoison13

90. Infamous
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Sucker Punch

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: May 26, 2009

Looking to depart from the cartoon-inspired Sly series, Sucker Punch turned toward Cole and his newfound electric abilities to make a more realistic and mature debut on the PlayStation 3. As soon as the mysterious package that Cole is delivering levels a portion of the city in a blast of fire and debris, his life is turned upside down: he wakes up, now able to control electricity. Soon, he finds himself battling the gangs that rise out of Empire City's darkest corners. However, does he do so in an evil manner or in the classic "good guy" role? The choice is up to the player and directly affects the moves that Cole can learn along with his overall appearance. Of course, foes that are more serious are running around the streets and Cole must utilize his powers, along with his parkour-inspired method of getting around, putting an end to their reign. -Argetlam

89. Wild Arms

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: MediaVision

Platform: PlayStation

Release: April 30, 1997

During the summer of 1997, I would ask members of an Internet chat room what new PlayStation games they could recommend. Just about everyone answered Wild Arms, an RPG that I hadn't heard of until that very moment. So I went out, I rented the game, I brought it home, and then I popped it in. The most inspiring anime FMV intro rolled on the screen. I was astonished. So, I played the game. It was delightful, of course, as this is a 2D/3D RPG, which I think was unheard of at the time. Outside of the battle system, the epic story revolving around the destruction of humans from demons, the three main protagonists (Rudy, Jack, and Cecilia) would ultimately band together to thwart them. The game was set up in an overhead view, whereas the turn-based battles were embellished into full 3D. Other cool features were how each of the three starring characters had their own puzzle-solving technique, such as Jack's mouse pal that could skid to otherwise unreachable areas and retrieve treasures. Final Fantasy VII might have been the bigger and better RPG of the same year, but Wild Arms has always remained one of my closest favorites. -GrayGargoyle

88. Lumines

Publisher: Ubisoft/Bandai

Developer: Q Entertainment

Platform: PlayStation Portable

Release: March 23, 2005

Lumines’ arrival on the puzzle scene for the recently launched PSP gave gamers the most addicting and rewarding puzzle game since the king of puzzle games: Tetris. Whereas Tetris asks players to fit differently shaped pieces together, Lumines simply asks you to do one thing: make squares out of squares. The challenge of Lumines isn’t about thinking fast while the speed increases to a blistering pace, it’s about one’s ability to maximize combos, paying attention to your squares while a wall of hip dance music surrounds you and the ever changing colors and backgrounds. It’s an aural majesty, helping to take the game’s simplicity to the ranks of puzzle classics. -GoodLuckSaturday

87. Burnout 3: Takedown

Publisher: Electronic Arts

Developer: Criterion Games

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 8, 2004

After Acclaim sold their beloved franchise to EA, many people were worried that the series would take a turn for the worse. All our worries were put to rest quickly however, as Burnout 3 is easily one of the best Burnouts ever made. Burnout 3 has simply so much to offer. With the addition of takedowns (the ability to wreak your opponent), the whole concept of battle racing really took off, making Burnout one of the fastest and most tense racing games out there. The controls and gameplay are so smooth you can play it all day. With the addition of online via PlayStation Network adapter, Burnout 3 really is a full package, mixing racing, speed and immensely detailed damage models all in one sleek shiny package. All of it makes this one of the best games ever made. -Brrnout

86. Final Fantasy X-2

Publisher: Square Enix

Developer: Square Enix

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: November 18, 2003

Square Enix surprised everybody when they revealed that a direct sequel to Final Fantasy X was in the works. Though most believe that the game did not require a sequel, Final Fantasy X-2 was a reasonably faithful continuation of the events after Final Fantasy X's conclusion. The game fixed some minor issues the original game may have had, such as the combat system. Though Final Fantasy X went back to traditional turn-based combat, many complained about how the game was too easy. X-2 chose to go back to the ATB combat system and added a few interactive elements such as Dresspheres and various abilities (such as repeatedly tapping R1 as a Gunner to crank out as many shots as possible), all while adding the challenge that Final Fantasy X lacked. Overall, Final Fantasy X-2 was a nostalgic experience, earning it a spot on the MVP Top 100. -DAXRULZ

85. Tekken 5

Publisher: Namco

Developer: Namco

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: February 25, 2005

The King of Iron Fist Tournament has returned. But Tekken 5 is much more than just another entry in the Tekken series. In addition to some new fighters, Tekken 5 includes an improved Story Mode, an all-new Arcade Mode, the ability to customize character costumes, a mini action/adventure game starring Jin called "Devil Within", and the inclusion of the arcade versions of the first three Tekken games. Tekken 5 has a lot to offer both new and longtime fans. Bored of fighting? Tekken 5 even includes an extra arcade space shooter called Star Blade. While relatively short, it makes for an interesting alternative to a loading screen, and is unlockable in its entirety to be played at any time. All extras aside, Tekken 5 is still a Tekken game at its core, but offers a nice overall package with countless hours of replayability. -tross88

84. Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Sucker Punch

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 26, 2005

The Cooper Gang is back, and this time Sly's on a personal mission to break into the Cooper Vault. But a scientist named Dr. M has set up camp around it, and is trying to do the same. In order to get through Dr. M's defenses and penetrate the Cooper Vault, the Cooper Gang would have to increase their ranks. Featuring four new playable characters, including two former enemies of the Cooper Gang, the latest chapter in the Sly series ventures into the realm of 3D, with the unusual inclusion of 3D glasses. Other new features include the ability to revisit favorite missions via the main menu, a series of "Master Thief Challenges," and a couple of multiplayer modes. Will the new Cooper Gang be enough to stop Dr. M, or will this mark the end of the Cooper legacy? -tross88

Sly 3 is the third game in a trilogy of cel-shaded platformer/stealth-action games starring a thief raccoon named Sly and his buddies Bentley and Murray. Unlike the previous two games, the story does not focus on the villain Clockwerk. Instead, Sly and his gang must recruit new members into their gang in order to get into the Sly family vault. The vault itself is being guarded and attempted to be broken into by the villainous Dr. M. Sly must prevent this, while at the same time reclaim the fortune that's rightfully his. The main gameplay focuses on doing whatever it takes in each new level in order to recruit certain characters that have skills the Sly gang needs in order to pull off the final job. Gameplay varies from dogfighting in Holland to piloting a pirate ship in search for "booty" by sinking other pirate ships. The player will never be bored playing Sly 3 and the ending begs the question, "Will there be a Sly 4?" Well, if you own the Sly collection on PS3 then you get an answer to that in the form of a teaser trailer after you beat Sly 3. So if you've never played Sly 3 or any of the games in the Sly series, you owe it to yourself to go buy The Sly Collection. -Hawkfan267

83. Zone of the Enders: The 2nd Runner

Publisher: Konami

Developer: Konami JPN

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: March 11, 2003

Most gamers' thought that the first Zone of the Enders was nothing. I thought that it was everything. Two years later, Konami's sequel arrived. Having to decide which was better between the two Zone of the Enders games was a bit difficult. The first one is so unforgettable, as it follows the exploits of a boy who wants nothing to do with a war, and a robot whose lifeless personality develops with the boy sitting inside of her. Now we come to the second game, where its scope of gameplay has significantly improved. Where the first game let you dash around in the air, spinning, tossing, slicing and dicing your robot foes up to a few at a time, the second game adds more, a lot more, to be exact. The second game ups the tempo of combat, as you'll be facing massive swarms of enemies at different points. You can now grab objects within the environment too, to use as shields or weapons. In mixtures of the first game's 3D now with actual 2D anime movies, the graphics look fantastic, and the voice work and sounds are inspiring as ever. Both Zones are in the zone. The second one, for my money, is the better of the irresistible two. -GrayGargoyle

82. Lunar 2: Eternal Blue Complete

Publisher: Working Designs

Developer: Game Arts

Platform: PlayStation

Release: November 30, 2000

Lunar is positively one of the best RPG franchises put forth. Compared to the first one, I'd have to say that the second backtracks a bit. The second game is amazing, naturally. However, the first one based its progression on an incredible music-driven story. Lunar 2, though, barely even has a connection with instrumental harmony. Though, the gameplay and graphics here are fairly the same, with an original new plot that is almost as good as the first's. Moreover, the game came with lots of new extras, including an authentic jewel necklace replicated after Lucia's, the hottie female lead in the game. For a Teen-rated game, she certainly gets naked an awful lot. -GrayGargoyle

81. Odin Sphere

Publisher: Atlus

Developer: Vanillaware

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: May 22, 2007

A solid sidescrolling action-RPG with five playable characters, each starring in his or her separate storyline, eventually leading up to an overarching climax. One of few fully voiced games on the PS2, which includes the ability to switch between English and Japanese audio at any point. The land of Erion is presented with a beautiful, hand-rendered art style. Though on rails, branching paths allow for a decent amount of exploration. A somewhat lengthy experience, divided into smaller parts, making it more manageable for the gamer with a short attention span. For those looking for their next fantasy fix, Odin Sphere shouldn't disappoint. Released near the end of the PS2’s life span, this gem may have been overlooked, but is a definite must play for fans of anything fantasy. -tross88

80. Tomba! 2 - The Evil Swine Return

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Whoopee Camp

Platform: PlayStation

Release: January 18, 2000

Tomba is back, off on another 2.5D sidescrolling adventure. Tomba can switch paths, sometimes even switching directions. With linear paths that take our hero forward, backward, even on angles, this is not your typical left-to-right sidescroller. Town areas still allow movement in all directions, thanks to an overhead isometric view. Tomba 2 also allows players to import their data from Tomba 1 via their memory card, allowing them to carry over their items. Will Tomba be able to save his childhood friend Tabby before it is too late? Her fate is in your hands. -tross88


79. Tales of the Abyss

Publisher: Namco

Developer: Team Symphonia (Namco Tales Studio)

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: October 10, 2006

Namco Bandai's popular Tales RPG series has evolved over the years, at one point even on the PlayStation 2. For its eighth major installment, Tales of the Abyss is a story based on Auldrant, a planet of great elemental resources. When it's discovered that a new source of prophetic powers exist, chaos ensues. Handled under Team Symphonia, this particular Tales entry had a similar calling to that of Tales of Symphonia before it, where the game kept its real-time battle arrangement but also moved onto Free Run, the series' unique integration to take off in any direction. A beloved classic, Tales of the Abyss stands proudly on our MVP favorite gaming list! -GrayGargoyle

78. The Orange Box

Publisher: Electronic Arts

Developer: EA UK/Valve

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: December 14, 2007

Not only was Half-Life 2 one of the most heralded FPS upon its release, but Valve went all out for the game’s port to the next-generation consoles. The economic value of including Half-Life 2 with an extra, unreleased episode was enough to get fans excited, but the addition of new first-person puzzle game Portal and the multiplayer action title Team Fortress 2 made it one of the greatest collections put together on one disc. Half-Life 2 was the selling point, but it would be Portal that would draw its own legacy from the collection. The subtle humor of Portal’s adventure, made up of a laboratory experiment, gave a new spin on first-person action games. -GoodLuckSaturday

77. TimeSplitters: Future Perfect

Publisher: Electronic Arts

Developer: Free Radical Design

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: March 22, 2005

In the 25th century, his colleague Anya gives Cortez, a hotheaded bald marine, a time-traveling uplink. With it, he must travel into the past to discover and destroy the origin of the TimeSplitters, dangerous interdimensional creatures that threaten present and future peace. Once Cortez discovers that the origin of the creatures is a complex series of events spanning many decades, he realizes that he must travel to multiple time periods in order to foil the plans of a disturbed scientist and his many connections. This game made the PS.com MVP Greatest Games of All Time because of its unique first-person-shooter storyline, exceptional landscapes, addictive gameplay, awesomely over exaggerated personalities, and spectacular teamwork capabilities (you even team up with a past version of yourself). -Sir-Climhazzard

76. Burnout Paradise
Publisher: Electronic Arts

Developer: Criterion Games

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: January 22, 2008

Set in the fictional world of Paradise City, Criterion Games took the Burnout series in a slightly new direction. Now, races and other events can be found within certain intersections of the city instead of in a menu. Also, "Crash Mode" has been reworked in that it is now called "Showtime," and like the races scattered throughout the city, it can be initiated on the fly. Dozens and dozens of cars, as well as a few bikes, can be raced through busy streets, up high near the snowy mountains, or across expansive bridges. Of course, these white-knuckle races are even more fun online. Throw in the fact that Criterion released some downloadable content in the form of a new area coupled with handfuls of more cars and gamers have one of the best racers on their hands. -Argetlam

75. Gran Turismo
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Sony Computer Entertainment

Platform: PlayStation

Release: May 12, 1998

The Gran Turismo series started in 1992 and this first edition was released 5 years later, in 1997. GT changed how people thought of racing games because GT gave them real vehicles that were licensed, life-like physics, sampled engine sounds and reasonable graphics for its era. Good collections of soundtracks were made famous by GT, as were various other elements. For instance, a wide variety of not only racecars, but also streetcars that players may have owned at home were a part of the game’s universe. A great collection of racetracks and environments, two playing modes (Arcade Mode and GT Mode), great menu design and gameplay all ended up making GT a powerhouse of a PlayStation franchise. Critical praise helped Sony to sell nearly 11 million copies. -MastrGT

74. Gran Turismo 2
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Polyphony Digital

Platform: PlayStation

Release: December 17, 1999

After the outstanding success of the original GT, Polyphony Digital released the second GT version with an astounding number of cars and almost 2.5 times as many tracks. The content was so large that GT2 had to be released with two CDs in its case. The same formula of passing license test, winning races to buy more cars or equipment to improve owned cars continued GT's success with players and fans. -MastrGT

73. Resident Evil 3: Nemesis

Publisher: Capcom

Developer: Capcom

Platform: PlayStation

Release: November 11, 1999

Jill decided to stay behind while Chris went to Europe to investigate Umbrella Corp. Unfortunately for Jill she was caught up in the disaster in Raccoon City. With a new Tyrant trained to seek out the remaining S.T.A.R.S. members, and a secret military force sent by Umbrella, will she be able to get to the bottom of everything before it's too late? Featuring a quick-time events system, the ability to counter enemy attacks, and a gunpowder mixing system, Resident Evil 3 stands out among the other entries in the series. With The Mercenaries: Operation Mad Jackal, and plenty of unlockables, including weapons, costumes, and endings, Resident Evil 3 is another great entry in the series in terms of value. And plenty of scares await, as no one knows when Nemesis will return. -tross88

72. Katamari Damacy

Publisher: Namco

Developer: Namco

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 22, 2004

For as long as console video games have existed, the urban legends of the Japanese industry always lurked as gaming’s greatest trivia machine, painting Japan in brightly colored games that were so outrageous they couldn’t possibly exist. Namco gave American gamers a taste of the outrageous side of Japan’s industry with the release of Katamari Damacy, an adventure game where a player took control of The Prince, a 5cm extraterrestrial, to roll up the consumer related world, in order to recreate the stars in the sky, destroyed by your rainbow spitting father’s night out. The game’s original pressing quickly sold out, and a huge clamor for the game has turned the series into a quirky cult classic that spawned three sequels. -GoodLuckSaturday

The King of All Cosmos has made a terrible, terrible mistake! In one of the greatest mishaps to befall our generation, he has destroyed every celestial body in the sky. As his son, it is up to the pint-sized Prince to collect material on Earth using his Katamari and bring life to the heavens once again! Namco's first entry into this groundbreaking series captivated gamers, and reminded us that you don't need flashy graphics or high-powered weaponry to make a great game. The simple fun offered in Katamari Damacy is ideal for any gamer who wishes to take a break from the norm. -Weidleface

71. Lunar: Silver Star Story Complete

Publisher: Working Designs

Developer: Game Arts

Platform: PlayStation

Release: June 2, 1999

The Lunar RPG franchise actually began on the under populated Sega Genesis add-on, the Sega CD. When brought to the PlayStation, it came not as just a game, but a game with a boatload of extras. Inside its specially designed game box (which was a fat package covered in anime) comes items like a cloth map of the world of Lunar, a sample of the game's beautifully made soundtrack, and a 'making of the game' video disc. Lunar itself is also one of the most wondrous games to play, see, and hear. Its comical and dramatic story told through inspiring anime-painted voiced sequences, its combo system akin to Chrono Trigger's, and its detailed 2D sprite-world fitted with the rich musical touch wraps up Lunar as one extremely nice treat to eat. -GrayGargoyle

70. Folklore
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Game Republic (JP)

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: October 9, 2007

Folklore is a game that falls under the category of "more than the sum of its parts." You can look at it individually and see great things. For example, it has one of the best game soundtracks I have ever heard. The detail to character and art direction is remarkable going so far as to change the position of the lead female Ellen’s hand indicating her self-esteem. That is to say nothing of the imagination put into all the creatures and Folks you come across. It also is one of few games to enhance gameplay through SIXAXIS compatibility. When it all comes together, the game elevates beyond greatness. You play the role of two characters: Ellen, who is a University Student, and Keats, a reporter of an occult magazine. Ellen is brought to the cliffside village of Doolin by a mysterious letter sent by her supposedly dead mother telling her to meet her there. Keats gets a phone call from a distressed woman who’s fearful of Faery creatures, telling him to come to her aid in Doolin where they are going to kill her. A complicated plot is slowly unraveled that takes Ellen and Keats into the Faery realm searching for the memories of the dead citizens of Doolin to try to piece together events from its past. While in the Faery realm, you fight through using Folks that you collect as you travel through the Faery realms. Folklore uses a rare breed of storytelling where the player is encouraged to think. Each plot point is not fed and overdosed onto the player but trickled down revealing more questions, and revealing some truly surprising plot twists. This truly unique and original game grabs you and to use a tired cliché, won’t let you go until it’s had its way with you. Folklore has created a world that can go in any direction and has countless more stories to tell. -White_oyster

69. Red Dead Redemption
Publisher: Rockstar Games

Developer: Rockstar San Diego

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: May 18, 2010

Perhaps not everyone had a chance to play this masterful title yet, because I’m of the mind that it, despite not even being a year old, it deserves to be even higher on the list. When Rockstar announced they were doing a Western, I was beyond ecstatic, having been in love with the Western genre in film for my entire life. Frankly, it still makes little sense to me that the genre hasn’t been explored more in the videogame medium, as it’s a perfect setting. No matter. After having been admittedly let down with Grand Theft Auto IV, I could only hope this game wouldn’t be "GTA in the Old West". And it wasn’t. Rockstar’s narrative surpassed, by far, anything they’ve done in the past, foregoing the sardonic jabs at pop culture for something that stands on its own, the unbelievable tale of a smartly written man steeped in moral ambiguity. Rockstar, in developing the protagonist John Marston, took control of their narrative, unprecedentedly influencing the actions of gamers, despite the robust, dynamic, and filled-to-the-brim open world. The game plays like a dream, the visuals are fantastic, featuring gorgeous vistas and skylines and large expanses of land, and everything is nearly flawless on a technical level (it also has a surprisingly well-done multiplayer component). It’s easy to get lost wandering the plains, hunting and skinning animals, or staying several rounds too many at the poker tables (I spent more time playing poker in Red Dead Redemption than I do in most other full games). And despite this undeniable richness to the world and addictive quality to the gameplay, it’s the game’s undeniably strong narrative that helps solidify the game as one of the best gaming experiences out there. It also features one of the most dramatic gameplay turns I have ever witnessed in the last handful of missions, which lends itself unbelievably to the poignancy of the overall tale, as well as a startling development decision towards the final moments of the narrative. Rockstar sacrifices neither the integrity of the narrative for the gameplay, nor the gameplay for the narrative, which is a feat rarely seen in video games. An instant classic. -ResidentZoidberg

68. Spyro the Dragon

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Insomniac Games

Platform: PlayStation

Release: September 10, 1998

In the wake of Super Mario 64, 3D platformers suddenly began to flood the market; quality control struggled as many classic characters tried so desperately to make the jump to hip new 3D, with open goals and expanding universes. Where others failed, Insomniac’s Spyro the Dragon on the PlayStation became Sony’s answer to Nintendo, showing that the 3D platforming genre could be shared. Featuring a quirky sense of humor and a wide array of characters, Spyro featured not only tight and responsive gameplay across an exciting variety of worlds, but with countless secrets, it became hard to pull the game from the system. -GoodLuckSaturday

67. Bayonetta

Publisher: SEGA

Developer: PlatinumGames/SEGA

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: January 5, 2010

Bayonetta is one of the few action video games out there that individuals can turn to for a slick, smooth, and stylish experience. Devil May Cry 4 and Ninja Gaiden ∑ 2 are in the same category. After playing through the Bayonetta demo many video gamers discovered that the hack-and-slash video game subgenre would never be the same once Bayonetta hit store shelves. Bayonetta is quite bizarre in presentation but sometimes individuals need to take chances with video games in order to see just what is out there. Bayonetta (the protagonist) is a witch capable of summoning Infernal Demons to her aid in battle against formidable angels. She can acquire a wide range of items and weapons from her enemies and allies in this video game as well as go toe to toe with some of the toughest angels out there. The storyline in this video game might not be one of its strongest points but its gameplay more than makes up for this potential shortcoming once players learn combinations of attacks, become familiar with "Witch Time" (dodging), and learn the attacks of their enemies. It will be easier for those individuals who like the Devil May Cry series to embrace Bayonetta (the video game) with open arms but that is not to say that this video game has little to offer anyone else. -SweetPoison13

66. Assassin's Creed II

Publisher: Ubisoft

Developer: Ubisoft Montreal

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: November 17, 2009

Born into a family of assassins, Ezio is the second man up in the Assassin's Creed franchise to go do what he does best: Climbing on rooftops and air assassinating. Ezio Auditore suddenly gets pushed into this world, when the opposing group, which you spent countless years fighting off and assassinating, kills his father and two brothers. This game was a major departure from the first Assassin's Creed and improved upon the many things that AC1 failed with. That coupled with the amazing storyline and gameplay make this one of the Greatest Games on our list. -LightJak

65. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2

Publisher: Activision

Developer: Infinity Ward

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: November 10, 2009

With the huge success of Call of Duty 4, a continuation was rather inevitable. Modern Warfare 2 brought back the great game that we loved in Call of Duty 4. Great new guns, gameplay mechanisms and one of the best game soundtracks ever; MW2 was another amazing game in the Call of Duty franchise. The story is deep and immersive. Bringing the experience of war to your TV, you truly felt the war rage around you as you hurdle down a dusty road with Russians blasting AKs after you. Immersion is one of the highest points with Call of Duty 4 and Modern Warfare 2. It's not often a shooter offers a story you would be fully committed into. Most offer a bunch of linear paths from one fight to another. But what Call of Duty 4 and Modern Warfare 2 create is a real intense story that goes through both games and will without a doubt end on the third installment. You truly feel emotionally attached to your character and those around you. With the continuation of the amazing story of Call of Duty 4 and just as much action, it is no wonder this game was added into our list of the greatest games of all-time. -Brrnout

64. Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas

Publisher: Rockstar Games

Developer: Rockstar North

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: October 25, 2004

The best-selling PlayStation game of all time, San Andreas took the Grand Theft Auto franchise to new heights of ambition and infamy. This title had it all: Gun fights, car races, casino games, celebrity voice acting, open-world exploration, dating sims, extreme sports, stealth missions, jet packs, scandalous hidden content, and an early ‘90s soundtrack to set the mood. Rockstar Games crammed every video game concept under the sun into one glorious package and created a masterpiece that appealed to the masses. On the flip side, the controversy over the game’s mature content (specifically the Hot Coffee minigame) continues to be brought up during discussions about video game censorship. For better or worse, this may be one of the most influential titles ever released on a PlayStation platform. -Moose-Steak

63. God of War III
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: SCE Studios Santa Monica

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: March 16, 2010

After two installments made their mark on the PlayStation 2, a lot of fans were anxious to see where Kratos and his next adventure would take him for the first time on the PlayStation 3. Despite the shift in platforms, gamers felt at home because, as always, the action was bloody, intense, over the top, and as tight and responsive as ever. With the help of the Titans, Kratos wants more than ever to see Zeus fall and will do anything to see this dream become a reality. With magic, various weapons, puzzles, brutal combos, and beautiful graphics, Kratos makes a memorable and violent debut on the PlayStation 3. -Argetlam

62. Harvest Moon: Back to Nature

Publisher: Natsume

Developer: Natsume

Platform: PlayStation

Release: November 30, 2000

Once upon a time, in your childhood, you spent some time on an old man's ranch when your family couldn't afford to pay for an expensive vacation. When the old man passes on, he leaves the farm to you. But don't count your chickens before they hatch (with the help of your incubator). You have three years to clean up the farm, and make it profitable again. If you don't prove yourself worthy as a farmer, you'll have to pack up and leave. Raise chickens and livestock, grow crops and expand your farm. But take the time to socialize with the townspeople, and participate in festivals. If you're lucky, you can marry the woman of your dreams and raise a family. The clock is ticking, but if you're willing to work hard, you should be up to the challenge. -tross88

61. Final Fantasy Anthology

Publisher: Square Electronic Arts

Developer: Squaresoft

Platform: PlayStation

Release: October 5, 1999

Final Fantasy Anthology introduced Final Fantasy V to North America and brought back another cult classic from SNES, Final Fantasy VI. Originally brought in as Final Fantasy III, Final Fantasy VI became an instant hit and the series gained an even larger fanbase outside of Japan due to it.  -jasquarefan

60. Sly 2: Band of Thieves

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Sucker Punch

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 14, 2004

Sucker Punch's follow-up to the popular title Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus took several risks in changing almost entirely how the original game played. This happened even though nothing was perceived to be wrong with the Thievius Raccoonus formula in the first place (as they say, if it's not broke don't fix it). Thankfully, the new take on the franchise turned out to be a refreshing experience. The worthy sequel gave players a multi-layered story with cinematic cutscenes, a plethora of customizable moves, and an experience that leaves you wanting for more long after the game is finished. -DAXRULZ

59. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII

Publisher: Square Enix

Developer: Square Enix

Platform: PlayStation Portable

Release: March 25, 2008

The highly anticipated prequel to the world-renowned Final Fantasy VII hit the PSP with immediate success, easily becoming one of the best-selling PSP titles to date. The story surrounded the life of Zack Fair, best friend to Cloud Strife, aspiring to become a hero as a first-rate member of SOLDIER. The game's graphics were unheard of for a PSP game and the fast-paced battle system kept players on their toes as they fought their way through a story that most would agree was almost as engaging as the original Final Fantasy VII. With a memorable protagonist, an intriguing original score, and an ending that left most gamers in tears, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII is easily one of the best examples of how a prequel to a smash-hit game should be told. -DAXRULZ

58. Fallout 3

Publisher: Bethesda Softworks

Developer: Bethesda Game Studios

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: October 28, 2008

Building on the engine it used to create the fantasy RPG bestseller Oblivion, Bethesda Softworks resurrected the Fallout franchise and brought the brilliant post-apocalyptic RPG Fallout 3 to the PlayStation 3. A departure from the usual RPG fare (and from the style of previous Fallout titles), Fallout 3 blended first-person shooter gameplay with deep customizable mechanics and dropped the player into the open world of Washington, D.C.’s radioactive wasteland. The game also featured strong voice acting (including Liam Neeson and Malcolm McDowell), a soundtrack consisting mostly of 1940’s pop music, and the ability to execute incredibly gory slow-motion headshots. -Moose-Steak

57. Jak 3

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Naughty Dog Software

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: November 9, 2004

After the success of Jak II, Naughty Dog didn't hesitate in preparing for the franchise's next sequel. Released only a year after Jak II, Jak 3 was found to be every bit as enjoyable as the previous entry in the Jak and Daxter saga. In addition to Dark Jak (which was introduced in Jak II), the game included Light Jak to balance out the darkness residing within the main character as well as grant him a new handful of abilities to aid him in this adventure. Though most widely herald Jak II as the best game in the series thus far, others argue Jak 3 to be the better game for several reasons: the story isn't quite as dark and depressing, the vehicles control significantly better, and the pedestrians in Haven City aren't as claustrophobically numerous. Jak 3 may have been tagged as "the conclusion of the epic legacy," but it was really the start of something new. -DAXRULZ

56. Twisted Metal 2
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: SingleTrac
Platform: PlayStation
Release: November 1, 1996

Twisted Metal 2 will always hold a special spot in my heart as one of my favorite games in the early days of the PS1. Vehicular combat with a dark, somewhat twisted sense of humor (and a frightening, psychotic clown among the cast of shady characters), the game was over-the-top in its silliness and unbelievably fun – particularly when playing with others. The locales – such as New York skyscraper rooftops – were so incredibly diverse and memorable, as were the unique characters (well, cars), each with their own perks, shortcoming, and special moves. No matter how many times someone put a remote control bomb in the Eiffel Tower, lying in wait for unsuspecting pray to wander up, blowing the thing up – particularly with someone inside – was so purely gratifying. The series would help to define the PlayStation 1 in the early years, and we all had a lot of fun playing it. -ResidentZoidberg

The reason that I was attracted to the original PlayStation the most was because of Twisted Metal. It was such an innovative game - placing you inside of a vehicle of your choice, equipped with weapons and special abilities. Your objective was to destroy all other vehicles using your distinctive powers. This was a phenomenal launch title, of course. When the sequel arrived, I was absolutely blown away by its new style. While the original had a plot with characters that get one wish from the evil mastermind of the Twisted Metal tournament (named Calypso) for beating the game, the endings had the same basic outline that was presented in text. The sequel, however, told its stories through sadistically cartoonish and mature scenery with voice-overs in tow. The gameplay and levels in the second Twisted Metal were also improved with more introductory characters and some of the series' best abilities. To give you an idea of the playable character roster, there was Mr. Slam (a backhoe-loader) that could grab another vehicle with his crushing grip, and my favorite Outlaw 2, the female edition of this cop car that could maneuver easily around and electrocute foes from any angle with voltaic rays. More power-ups, cool hiding places and secrets, and improved visuals and sounds all made Twisted Metal 2 a sequel too good to be true. -GrayGargoyle

55. Gran Turismo 3 A-spec
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Polyphony Digital
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: July 10, 2001

The PlayStation 2 hardware allowed Polyphony Digital to greatly increase the quality and realism of GT's graphics and sound. Polygon counts for cars were more than thirteen times larger than for the first two versions. While GT was still not online, it used the original PS2's Firewire port to create a LAN connection. The numbers of cars dropped below 200 again, but the new tracks, added realism and the new hardware GT played on helped GT3 become the biggest selling version to date and one of the PS2's top sellers. -MastrGT

54. Okami
Publisher: Capcom

Developer: Clover Studio
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: September 19, 2006

Okami was truly a work of art, in the game concept itself and the overall style of the game. The game features a very unique cel-shaded art style and is based upon traditional Japanese myths and legends. Playing as Amaterasu, the Shinto sun goddess, you're tasked with protecting Kamiki village and overtaking Orochi. This masterpiece was much underrated when it came out. In fact, it is in the world book of records for being the least commercially successful game to win the Game of the Year award. –jasquarefan

The debate over whether video games are art seems endless. Okami bypasses the debate by putting you inside the art. You adventure inside a painting inspired by traditional Japanese art spanning forests, fields, and ocean shores. You play the sun God Amaterasu taking the form of a wolf tasked in saving the world from great evil. You have the Celestial Brush as an aid throughout the game; other Gods bestow Amaterasu with powers for the Celestial Brush. Your aim is to restore the Guardian Saplings, which cleanse the world of darkness. When the Guardian Saplings are restored, a wash of cherry blossoms and flowers sweep the land and it’s restored to its natural beauty. The sound direction is equally as fulfilling as the art direction. The use of Japanese instruments gives the nontraditional music a traditional sound. The music and visuals do a lot to elevate this game, but if the gameplay itself was empty, even its beauty could not save it. I can say the gameplay is as fun and rewarding as the game is beautiful to look at. Inspired by The Legend of Zelda, you are taken on an exciting ride through beautiful landscapes frolicking with the energy of a Sun God bent on saving the land from all encompassing darkness. Armed with the Celestial Brush, this tool allows you to paint objects into existence, change night into day and cause general havoc, and with a minute friend named Issun, Amaterasu ventures. -White_oyster

53. God of War: Chains of Olympus

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Ready At Dawn Studios
Platform: PlayStation Portable
Release: March 4, 2008

Kratos fans knew this bloodthirsty warrior to be terrific on the console side, but could he match up a spectacular tale of revenge for portable gamers all the same? That's what developer Ready at Dawn went to find out when they took it upon themselves to create the very first PSP-based God of War entry, Chains of Olympus. With killer visuals and sounds that nearly matched up to its PlayStation 2 predecessors, the gameplay mechanics also came somewhat close, albeit not quite with the PSP compensating its finger-paining analog nub twists over the analog sticks. Plotted as a predecessor to the console versions, the narrative was not as well told here, as the Ghost of Sparta is on a journey to track down his supposedly dead daughter, Calliope. Ready at Dawn didn't hammer God of War's presence into handheld history as well as gamers' could hope for, but nevertheless they made a favorable action-adventure extra that lets gamers play at home or anywhere they may go. -GrayGargoyle

52. Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht

Publisher: Namco
Developer: Monolith Software
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: February 25, 2003

2003's. Best. Game. Most critics it seems denied Xenosaga the rights to that claim because its game cinemas were too long. Well, what about Xenogears' dialogue? Wasn't reading a full newspaper every character you talked to too long as well? I for one would rather watch the movie than read the book. But, maybe that's just me. Anyway, Xenosaga has the makings of one of the best games ever, I think, because it pushes the envelope just about everywhere you look. You want the absolute best in 3D anime-inspired characters? You've got it. You want wickedly cool voices that match each and every character's personality rightly? You've got it. You want a better-than-going-to-the-movies story? You've got it. You want an in-and-out-of mecha battle system with some of the most impressive attacks? You've got that too. Also with tons of mini-games like one that's similar to poker, or sidequests like one that's an Easter egg hunt for new parts, and more than 80 hours of gameplay, Xenosaga inspires me (and subsequently you) straight to number fifty-two. -GrayGargoyle

51. Gran Turismo 4
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Polyphony Digital
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: February 22, 2005

Polyphony Digital continued to outdo themselves with each incarnation of their flagship series Gran Turismo, and Gran Turismo 4 was no different. Not only did the game feature more responsive driving controls, but also it featured an unrivaled set of vehicle choices and locales, with even crisper and more realistic graphics, creating the next evolution in driving simulation. –GoodLuckSaturday

Before GT4 got released PD experimented with releasing a Prologue version first, only not here in North America, but PD learned from that mistake and released one world-wide for GT5. However, GT4 awed fans with its new Photo Mode and was ready to get GT fans online. Online for GT4 never happened, though, as GT4 was delayed to remove this mode. GT4's graphics, though, including a 1080i mode, pushed the PS2 to its limits. PD introduced the B-spec mode allowing the player to let a virtual driver handle the car on his own. The collection of car models in GT4 now included historical and other famous cars, some were even made for this GT, plus many more streetcars allowed players to drive their own cars in-game. Many more real life racetracks were included, too. Gameplay changed a bit, such as having no prize carousel, where players complained about the new physics and having no online or car damage, and the result was sales slumped from GT3's peak. -MastrGT

50. Ratchet & Clank Future: Tools of Destruction
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Insomniac Games
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: October 23, 2007

It has been said Tools of Destruction is like playing a Pixar movie. It takes place in a polished, colorful cartoon universe filled with impossibly awesome weapons. Want to make little slug like creatures dance? Throw out a Groovitron. And all your weapons that don’t believe in physics are upgradeable. This game goes deeper than having fun with over-the-top weapons and laughably absurd villains who can’t maneuver their ship and keep bumping into rocks. It has a touching story of deep friendship, and trying to discover a lost past and a lost race. You play Ratchet, the last Lombax in the universe. Tachyon who destroyed the Lombax civilization is bent on destroying Ratchet since he is the last Lombax. They both are racing to find the Dimensionator, a device able to open wormholes into other dimensions. I think I can say there has never been a bad Ratchet and Clank game, but Tools of Destruction brings all the elements that make the games great to perfection. The visuals, the humor, the tight run-and-gun and platforming gameplay, story and outlandish weapons come together to make one of the most fun times one can have with a game. -White_oyster

49. Final Fantasy Tactics

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Squaresoft
Platform: PlayStation
Release: January 28, 1998

This here is pretty much the single reason why there is still hope for strategy games on consoles. Square, having been known for their massive Final Fantasy RPG series at the time, at one point took a break and headed for the strategy genre. Of course, like every Square game at the time (or most of them anyway), Final Fantasy Tactics was gold. In a turn-based system, Tactics used an epic plot along with a simple but effective system for strategy. It combined RPG elements and strategy elements into one, where moving characters in your team along the gridded map and using weapon or magic implementations was followed by victory for tactics and a good use of aligning your team. The graphics and sounds for Tactics were beautiful, as I recall. Not that it's easy for Square to let anyone down on those terms. Final Fantasy Tactics has been and always has remained my favorite console-based strategy title. -GrayGargoyle

48. Grand Theft Auto III

Publisher: Rockstar Games
Developer: DMA Design

Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 22, 2001

With its initial release exclusive to the PlayStation 2 in 2001, GTA3 would heavily influence console game design for the rest of the decade. Featuring wild vehicular crime sprees and unrepentant gangland violence, this title was largely responsible for the rise in popularity of both sandbox style games and the acceptance of M-rated content for adult gamers. GTA3 also popularized a number of game mechanics that would later be copied by its many imitators, including the use of in-game radio stations full of real pop tunes and the ability to steal any vehicle in sight. -Moose-Steak

Rockstar’s groundbreaking Grand Theft Auto III remains one of the most influential titles in video game history. The scope of Liberty City was unmatched, the freedom unlike anything ever felt before. Rockstar pulled out all the stops and revolutionized the action/adventure genre with a single stroke. The game made the PlayStation 2 a must-own; the game was on the tip of every single person’s tongue, even if they had never played it. It was the game that launched a million Grand Theft Auto IIIs, all desperately trying to dethrone the king, all falling ever so short. There is a reason this game defined a console, why it’s one of the most important titles of all-time; it’s one-of-a-kind in a sea of knockoffs. -GoodLuckSaturday

47. Silent Hill

Publisher: Konami

Developer: Konami

Platform: PlayStation

Release: February 24, 1999

As Harry Mason is driving along, he sees a woman on the road, and swerves to avoid her. He drives off the road, and wakes up in the town of Silent Hill. But something's not right. He glances beside him, to find that his daughter Cheryl is missing. Will he find her before it's too late? And why is it suddenly so dark? The start of one of the best survival-horror series to date, Silent Hill doesn't disappoint. With the right atmosphere, and non-stop scares, this is one game that truly deserves to be called a survival-horror classic. -tross88

46. Dark Cloud 2

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Level-5

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: February 18, 2003

The strengths in Dark Cloud 2 were built in its vibrant world. A gorgeous landmark in the evolution of cel-shading graphics, the action-RPG allowed players traditional dungeon crawling, as they worked to build a world in order to save it a century in the future. Dark Cloud 2 was a grandiose statement to the RPG world about the future of the genre. It was big, it was alive, and it gave players plenty of minigames, such as fishing and golfing. The game’s quality speaks for itself, a tightly wound adventure that put Level-5 on the map and was the recipient of Game of the Year awards. -GoodLuckSaturday

45. Grand Theft Auto IV

Publisher: Rockstar Games

Developer: Rockstar North

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: April 29, 2008

Grand Theft Auto IV seems to offer individuals a very different experience from what they have come to expect from the Grand Theft Auto series. This video game is not using Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas as a blueprint and this seems to bother many individuals. Players take control of Niko Bellic, a war veteran from Eastern Europe who has come to America in hopes of living a better life. He joins his cousin Roman Bellic in Liberty City and the two try to make a living in one of the worst cities in America. Before long players discover that it is nearly impossible for Roman and Niko to make an honest living (let alone survive) with the Russian Mafia breathing down their necks. Grand Theft Auto IV has a stronger narrative than its predecessors, which is a refreshing new feature that helps enhance the experience that an individual might take away from this video game. Character development has never truly been a highlight in the Grand Theft Auto series up until this point, which is unfortunate because individuals might not be looking for this in a Grand Theft Auto video game. The gameplay in Grand Theft Auto IV leaves much to be desired but this is not to say that an individual cannot adjust to it over time. The missions that help drive the memorable storyline in this video game may suffer from repetitive objectives and individuals might find interpersonal relationships in this video game unnecessary but this is definitely a strong Grand Theft Auto installment. -SweetPoison13

44. Resistance: Fall of Man

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Insomniac Games

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: November 13, 2006

Insomniac Games has always been a really light sided developer making games of an often light nature (Ratchet & Clank, Spyro), so the last thing you would expect is a gritty, violent FPS based on crazy creatures trying to eat you for breakfast. So the first sight of Resistance was a reason to wonder. But we needn't have worried, as Resistance raised the bar for every shooter to come. What truly makes Resistance an amazing game is the believability and atmosphere of the game. Resistance takes place in an alternative dimension where World War II never occurred. Rather than worry about one nation, the world is faced with a new race (the Chimera) with much more than Panzer tanks. Resistance not only makes this new world believable, but it also makes it as interesting as our own. With the amazing guns, story and great depth is it any wonder it made our top 100 games? -Brrnout

43. Silent Hill 2

Publisher: Konami

Developer: Konami TYO

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 25, 2001

Resident Evil may have brought horror games into the mainstream, but it was Silent Hill that was too busy thinking about how it was going to rip our eyeballs out of our sockets. Silent Hill, a late bloomer in the PlayStation's life, is the horror title that started the franchise on its way to fame. But Silent Hill 2, I think, is the one that produces a higher capacity of psychotic mayhem. And psychotic mayhem equals the better scares in a better game. In this entry, we find new character James Sanderson in search of his dead wife who contacted him from the town of - you guessed it - Silent Hill. Even creepier is that inside of Silent Hill, monsters pop out from their hiding places and are now trying to kill James, including the sickly, deranged, giant sword-wielding creature known as Pyramid Head. Ground-scuttling deformities, live mannequins, and updated nurses with blank faces and bone-curdling screams make further progression shocking. Advanced graphics and sounds (of course) help to flesh out the grimmest Hell that Silent Hill is. -GrayGargoyle

Silent Hill 2 does not pick up where Silent Hill left off but it intensifies the psychological experience that players take away from this video game tenfold. James Sunderland is grief-stricken when his beloved wife Mary dies from an incurable disease. After receiving a letter from his wife after her death, James begins to question the events that lead up to her death and whether or not she really died 3 years ago. The letter tells James that his wife is waiting for him in Silent Hill so James embarks on a journey to find answers to this confusing chain of events. Players soon find themselves making their way through the town of Silent Hill as James in search of answers or anything that might be able to shine light on the events surrounding Mary’s death. What exactly happened to Mary? Did she really die 3 years ago? Is she really waiting for James in Silent Hill? Players will need to search for the answers to these questions and carefully put together pieces of a puzzle that might not even make sense at first. Silent Hill 2 does an incredible job of demonstrating the psychological horror aspects for which the Silent Hill series is well known. Many Silent Hill fans consider Silent Hill 2 to be not only a survival-horror masterpiece but also a work of art that simply needs to be experienced. -SweetPoison13

42. Xenogears

Publisher: Square Electronic Arts
Developer: Squaresoft

Platform: PlayStation
Release: October 20, 1998

As the role-playing genre emerged into a successful endeavor outside of Japan, one of the most respected games to come during the PlayStation’s most fruitful era was Squaresoft’s Xenogears. The game’s science-fiction story helped set it apart from its contemporaries, but more so did its extensive usage of religious themes and philosophical ideals of Friedrich Nietzsche and others. The maturation of the game’s storytelling elements was a big boost to the genre moving forward as was its cinematic approach. Xenogears also featured a deep, rewarding battle system with fighting taking place both on the ground and in giant robots called Gears. The game’s legacy is imprinted in every greatest game list, including this one; with a large portion of fans feeling the game’s soundtrack remains the greatest in video game history. -GoodLuckSaturday

41. Jak II

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Naughty Dog Software

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: October 14, 2003

The sequel to Naughty Dog's epic Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy exploded onto the PS2 with an overall different style, updated graphical quality, and a deep storyline in such a way that it was almost unrecognizable as a continuation of the original. Was this a good thing? YES. It's rare in any medium to see a sequel that surpasses the original in every aspect, and Jak II is one of those sequels. The game featured elements that few would see coming: guns, mild language, Dark Jak, and a dark story that most would consider lengthy for a platformer. Jak II launched the epic saga in a new, unexpected direction, adding fuel to the franchise's success and winning our hearts as one of our favorite games. -DAXRULZ

40. Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater

Publisher: Konami

Developer: Konami JPN (KCEJ)

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: November 17, 2004

Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is an interesting Metal Gear Solid installment. Some individuals consider it to be the best that the Metal Gear Solid series has to offer while others consider it to be the "black sheep" of the series. Players take control of Naked Snake and embark on solo sneaking missions during the Cold War that will ultimately reveal how Naked Snake came to be known as Big Boss. During these solo sneaking missions, players need to keep Naked Snake in good condition by healing his wounds and obtaining meals from his surrounds. The attention to detail in Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is astonishing and a true highlight whether individuals are listening to the radio conversations between characters or sneaking through the Russian wilderness, which is populated with various flora and fauna. With that being said, this video game has no real shortcomings beyond its camera angles, which are nonexistent issues in Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence. The online multiplayer mode in Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence, Metal Gear Online, certainly has a few things to offer Metal Gear Solid fans but many individuals would argue that the single-player campaign in either Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater or Metal Gear Solid 3: Subsistence is where this video game shines. -SweetPoison13

39. Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories

Publisher: NIS
Developer: NIS

Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: August 29, 2006

Disgaea: Hour of Darkness was billed as the endless game. Breaking conventional RPG wisdom, the game was an RPG fan’s dream to overkill, as the game offered a level cap of 9,999 instead of the traditional 99. How do you top that? How about streamlining the previous experience, you create more hidden secrets, in addition to a whole new gameplay mode that takes away the player’s level and put a heavy emphasis on strategy. Fitting for a strategy-RPG, no? The game featured a colorful new cast of characters with tons of returning favorites, a twisted brand of humor, and the never-ending style of play. See you in a few years when you’re done. -GoodLuckSaturday

38. Guitar Hero II
Publisher: Activision/RedOctane
Developer: Harmonix
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: November 7, 2006

Guitar Hero started off in a big way. Gamers were immediately drawn to the operations of a specialty peripheral-driven game. A sequel soon followed. From Harmonix, who went onto Rock Band fame, Guitar Hero is a music game of note before the rock scene exploded into the redundantly stale state it's in today. Like many, I had a great time watching friends blasting guitars and myself getting to know the steps to playing through Guitar Hero II. Suggested that I pick up a copy, as expensive as it was (nearing $100), the game was still a lot of fun to play. As colored notes scrolled down the screen, on the guitar peripheral holding down or rapidly tapping and keeping up with the associated keys in succession was challenging at times, but compelling all the same. Strumming through a long list of classic and some modern rock favorites, Kiss and Danzig being some of the (cover artist) bands used here to give players something to listen to and very much like to play with. Scenes of rockers rocking out, players keeping up with groups of memorable song tracks while trying to complete songs on the Expert level, and becoming an addictive fan of this unrehearsed feat for the gaming scene all made Guitar Hero II an easy fan favorite for millions. -GrayGargoyle

37. Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Insomniac Games

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: October 27, 2009

Ratchet and Clank have been around for countless years and you would think that after all the games that the formula would start to get old. But thanks to Insomniac’s great ability to make a game seem constantly fresh, A Crack in Time is just another amazing game for the platforming world to enjoy. With new Clank modes and new time-manipulation controls, the game gives a huge sense of freshness making it just as addicting as any previous Ratchet game. Insomniac once again adds in their trademark humor making the game all the more fun to play. With another amazing story, great new abilities, memorable characters, and countless hours of fun. A Crack in Time once again proves that an old series can still feel fresh and exciting. -Brrnout

36. Flower
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: thatgamecompany
Platform: PlayStation Network
Release: February 12, 2009

Typical is the least of what Flower is. Extraordinarily gorgeous, Flower is a PlayStation Network title, thePlayStation Network title, that no gamer should fail to ignore. I too was one such player, at first thinking, "What's the big deal?" Playing as a flower petal, through a flower petal dream, you'll utilize the PlayStation 3's SIXAXIS control scheme to guide the lead petal through a visceral world spread across bright and dying fields, as the petals from blossomed flowers tail your charge into this corrupting tale of technology over life. On paper, the concept may not sound like much, but when you're one with the symphony, the beauty, it becomes that reason why there's a smile smeared across your face. -GrayGargoyle

35. Heavy Rain
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Quantic Dream
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: February 23, 2010

It's raining, it's pouring, and without this game, your life would be booooooring! Heavy Rain is one of the most special entries in the PlayStation 3's life span. Unless you've played Indigo Prophecy before it (which also comes from the same development team), it's quite unlike anything else out there. The story revolves around a mysterious serial killer who has taken one family's child hostage. Placed through a series of trials and hazards that base around the lives of four intersecting and emotionally driven character events, the game fuses SIXAXIS motion-controls very well. On-screen controller actions keep you immersed; even if you mess up, the action keeps flowing in the middle of a fight with an attacker or through a series of dodging incoming traffic. Remarkably beautiful, Heavy Rain is possibly the most awe-inspiring game to have been crafted on the PlayStation 3. Sound quality itself is through the roof, with a stirring soundtrack that will keep you listening. Usually an unwelcome weather element, Heavy Rain is one black cloud you'll adore hovering overhead. –GrayGargoyle

Heavy Rain is a bit hard to define. It’s not a game about winning, losing, or final bosses or kill streaks or "S" ranks or any of that. Rather, it’s a hardboiled, somewhat heavy-handed interactive drama. Heavy Rain’s narrative focuses on four separate protagonists – architect Ethan Mars, journalist Madison Paige, private detective Scott Shelby, and FBI agent Norman Jayden – whose lives interweave with one another. Without giving too much away, the game’s unifying "antagonist" is a serial killer given the moniker "Origami Killer" thanks to the small origami art found atop all of the victims. Staying true to the "interactive drama" genre, Heavy Rain is entirely narrative-driven, as the characters wrestle with internal and external conflict, yet transcends its own newly created genre thanks to an accessibility that grants it wider appeal than Quantic Dream’s last outing. It’s also an unabashedly dark, mature game, with hints of the film noir genre, as it focuses on its overwhelmingly grounded characters thrust into extraordinary, exigent circumstances, also flirting heavily with the question of the tagline, "How far would you go to save someone you love?" It probes the depths of human nature, among other things, far more than almost all games before it. The script is also rife with thrilling, intense moments, which juxtapose beautifully with the theme of subtlety and nuance prevalent throughout the experience. In fact, Heavy Rain features some of the most intense scenes video games have ever seen, due in great part to the connection to characters that the strong storytelling and atmosphere breed. This is all made possible thanks to the incredible technology and strikingly realistic animations (particularly facial animations), which serve only to further the immersion. Heavy Rain is a decidedly different title – it’s a gripping narrative about consequence, big or small, and a testament to the emotional connection a game can bring. Nearly perfect, and not be missed. -ResidentZoidberg

34. Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Naughty Dog Software

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: December 4, 2001

The birth of a legend, Jak and Daxter go on an adventure to collect power cells and try to change Daxter back from his Ottsel form, which he transformed into at the beginning of the game. They heard only one person could have turned things around, and he eventually turns out to be the bad guy. So Jak and Daxter save the day and destroy the evil force that tried to control Dark Eco to gain power in the world. While the gameplay was very simple and it wasn't a very complex game, it was ground zero for the sequels and set up the story for the rest of the franchise. Who knew we could have seen Jak go from a mute country boy to a badass rebel with a gun (and he can talk too!). The fact is everything about the first game made us love the world of Jak and Daxter. It is considered a classic in the PlayStation family of games, hence why it is on our Greatest Games list. -LightJak007

33. Final Fantasy XII

Publisher: Square Enix

Developer: Square Enix

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: October 31, 2006

Final Fantasy XII is a prime example of how change can be a very... VERY... good thing. Although the idea of breaking away from the traditional turn-based combat system was a huge risk, it proved to be a more involving experience that allows the player to essentially think on their feet. More than just the combat, the graphical quality is almost acceptable by PS3 standards and the world is extremely vast, nearly pushing Square Enix to put this game on two discs. Final Fantasy XII is a satisfying entry to the series with enough to do in the game to keep anybody busy for a considerable period of time (take, for example, 50-60 hours of story with 100+ hours of sidequests). -DAXRULZ

Among my personal favorites in the franchise, Final Fantasy XII often takes flack from some fans due to its drastic departure from the famous series’ typical conventions. Don’t listen to those guys, they’re just bitter or stuck in days gone by. Final Fantasy XII is pretty, for one. Boasting some of the best visuals on the PS2, the game – and not just the gorgeous CG cutscenes – stands up to scrutiny today. The eastern-European/Mediterranean architecture really lends itself to creating an entirely believable, rich fantasy setting. When I first started the game, I spent a good 45 minutes wandering aimlessly around the city of Rabanastre, taking in the architecture and art direction; it’s that stunning. The game is also set apart from typical Final Fantasy fare by its narrative, which focuses more on a broader conflict, war, and politics, as opposed to the familiar melodrama of a handful of characters. The unique writing and accents only heighten the immersion in an already-remarkable fantasy setting, while the voice acting is among the best in the series’ short list of voiced titles (an exponential step up from X, anyways). However, most distinct of Final Fantasy XII is its MMORPG-inspired gameplay, which eschews the familiar turn-based system and random battles in favor of something more dynamic, in quasi-real-time (there is still an ATB and I controlled most individual actions). The game also features gorgeous, open levels, a ton of sidequests and optional marks, and a robust leveling system allowing players to upgrade their characters in whatever many they see fit. If it’s possible to attribute the quality of underrated-ness to a Final Fantasy game, this is definitely the one. An incredibly immersive world, good writing, and addictive gameplay all help Final Fantasy XII solidify its spot on this list. -ResidentZoidberg

32. ICO
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: SCE Studios Japan
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: September 25, 2001

ICO's a game that deserves so much more than it's been given, as many didn't play it at the starting point. But those having dived into ICO's bliss are the lucky ones. I myself wasn't sure about ICO... until I played its magnificent demo off of the PlayStation Underground CD that released the summer before the game's debut. I must have gone through the demo about five times, since I was so struck in awe by its wondrous entirety. ICO triumphs greatly, because it's an adventure game so unlike any before it. You're a horned boy trapped inside of a castle when the villagers lock you in. Freeing himself, ICO soon finds a mysterious girl also barred within the castle's walls. Together the two form an alliance: the boy solves puzzles and battles the shadow demons that are out to capture the girl, and the girl unlocks the magical doors that seal the exits that you want to go through. This all works especially with the artistic beauty in graphics and sound achievements, as does the short-sided yet involving storyline of the boy, the girl, and the dark shadow mother out to snatch Yorda from ICO's hands. While completion time doesn't last forever, ICO is one of gaming's brightest spectacles I've ever had the pleasure of enduring. -GrayGargoyle

31. Ratchet & Clank: Going Commando

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Insomniac Games

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: November 11, 2003

Going Commando is the second installment in the Ratchet and Clank franchise and to this day is still hailed by many as the best of the series. Going Commando has an amazing story. The story itself is immense making it one of the longest in the series. Featuring a deep immersive story, deep and humorous characters and taking so many twists along the way you will swear the game should have ended three or four times! As you explore the many worlds of Going Commando, you will find hidden treasures, buy new and amazing guns, meet interesting characters, and dig for treasures in sandbox environments and much more. Although, all the Ratchets have kept a very similar style from game to game. Going Commando stands out as one of the very best because of its length, depth, and innovation. For sure one of the greatest games ever made and a worthy addition to the MVPs’ greatest games of all-time. -Brrnout

30. Killzone 2

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: Guerrilla Games/SCEE

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: February 27, 2009

Widely called the best shooter of 2009 and one of the most graphically advanced shooters ever made; Killzone 2 is no slack off game. Although the story is not the most interesting, the game makes up for it in every other way. The deep and innovative multiplayer not only features enough content to keep you playing for months on end, but its creative game modes and smooth gameplay make it a really unique online experience. But Killzone 2's biggest asset is by far the gameplay and graphics. This is not just another shooter. It looks truly amazing in every way. But the game also feels truly unique by making shooting, running and jumping feel new again. The player will truly need to master the movement if he or she wishes to master Killzone 2. Combine the graphics, multiplayer, and amazing graphics and you have one of the best games ever made. Without a doubt, Killzone 2 is a worthy candidate for our list of 100 greatest games ever made. -Brrnout

29. Grand Theft Auto: Vice City
Publisher: Rockstar Games
Developer: Rockstar North
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 29, 2002

I don't think that anyone first thought the Grand Theft Auto franchise would eventually lead to stardom. When the earlier Grand Theft Auto games were released, they were good games, but not the amazingly non-linear and addictive action Mafioso titles that we've known them for. When word of mouth spread that Grand Theft Auto III would become the hottest selling title in 2001, it was natural that Rockstar would follow-up on its extreme success. No one would think that it'd be a year later when Rockstar would come up with a better title that sports a retro '80s fake Miami City, sporting more weapons, more vehicles (including motorcycles), and more things to do in newer mission types, better graphics, and a whole lot of classic '80s music from a range of genres. With many Hollywood actors on board as well, Vice City became not just a Grand Theft Auto III repeat, but a bigger and better one. -GrayGargoyle

28. Resident Evil 2

Publisher: Capcom

Developer: Capcom

Platform: PlayStation

Release: January 21, 1998

Following the events of the first Resident Evil, an outbreak occurs in Raccoon City. What could have caused this? Leon, a rookie cop, and Claire, the sister of Chris Redfield, find themselves in the midst of it all. Will they escape unharmed, or will they help feed the growing zombie population? With a scenario system that allows the events of the second character's side of the story to build on the first, which also plays out differently depending on which character is chosen first, Resident Evil 2 is a cut above the rest in terms of storytelling. Two secret characters, an extra unlockable mode, and reason enough to play through the main game four times, means that this is one entry in the series that won't be over in a hurry. -tross88

27. Kingdom Hearts II

Publisher: Square Enix

Developer: Square Enix

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: March 28, 2006

After three-and-a-half years, Square Enix released the first sequel to the smash hit 2002 game Kingdom Hearts. The long wait was worthwhile, living up to fans' expectations and then some. Some critics even referred to Kingdom Hearts II an example of the perfect sequel. The game presented a darker story, introduced drive forms, and utilized a groundbreaking Reaction Command combat option. With new worlds, a multi-layered plotline, and a menacing organization, Kingdom Hearts II is a key turning point in the successful franchise in terms of both story and gameplay. -DAXRULZ

26. Devil May Cry

Publisher: Capcom
Developer: Capcom Production Studio 4

Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 17, 2001

In a time when every action game is hyped beyond belief and oozes more style than it can ever make use of, it’s hard to imagine that Capcom’s Devil May Cry was truly one-of-a-kind when it was released. Suddenly, PlayStation 2 owners were overwhelmed at the sheer coolness of Dante, and were unsure how to respond to just how awesome his adventures were. Devil May Cry’s "Cool as Hell" style and gameplay stand as one of the most important advances in the third-person action genre so much that Dante remains one of video game’s most recognizable faces. -GoodLuckSaturday

25. Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening

Publisher: Capcom

Developer: Capcom Production Studio 1

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: March 1, 2005

After Devil May Cry 2 lowered the expectations of DMC video gamers everywhere, the video game industry saw the release of Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening, a prequel to Devil May Cry and a relatively challenging hack-and-slash video game. Players take control of a younger Dante who is in the process of establishing his Devil May Cry business. It would appear that Dante’s twin brother Vergil is trying to open the gate to the Demon World and needs Dante’s other half of the amulet in order to do so. Will Vergil be able to obtain Dante’s amulet? What will happen if the gate to the Demon World opens? Will Dante care enough about the events that are taking place around him to stop Vergil or is he only interested in the thrill of a confrontation with him? Players will be able to collect a handful of different weapons, learn a wide array of attacks with which to eliminate enemies, and select from a handful of different styles with which to customize Dante. Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening is one of the most challenging PlayStation®2 video games available given its fast-paced action and the demands that can be placed onto the player, but it can be a very rewarding experience given its immense replay value. The Special Edition of Devil May Cry 3: Dante’s Awakening only serves to increase this replay value with new features such as a new Bloody Palace mode and the ability to play as Dante’s brother Vergil. -SweetPoison13

24. Batman: Arkham Asylum
Publisher: Eidos Interactive
Developer: Rocksteady Studios
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: August 25, 2009

The extent of my Batman fanaticism may be alarming to some – I find it perfectly healthy. Accordingly, it is not without great pride and satisfaction that I’m able to write about a Batman game that defied reasonable expectation and made this list not with the qualification of being good "for a Batman game", but actually being an exceptionally well-crafted title. Batman: Arkham Asylum quickly became one of my favorite games ever, immediately endearing itself to my heart. I mean, for one, they recruited the amazing voice talent from the '90s Batman: The Animated Series (one of the finest animated shows to ever grace the television). Second, they actually used the Unreal Engine in an interesting, unique, and visually arresting manner! Third, they combined great characters, visuals, voice acting, story, setting, etc. with absolutely phenomenal and rewarding gameplay. I mean, that's how you should feel as Batman. It was precise - surgical, even - and perfectly balanced. It’s among Bats’ finest showings across any medium, and he has strutted his shadowy stuff across many. -ResidentZoidberg

23. Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare

Publisher: Activision

Developer: Infinity Ward

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: November 5, 2007

Making a risky departure from the WWII setting it helped popularize, Infinity Ward brought first-person shooters up to date with COD4’s modern military setting and created an online gaming sensation. The game’s single-player story mirrored current real-world concerns and gave players an exhilarating and sobering look into that setting. The multiplayer further kept the game alive well past its release by providing an incredibly polished experience, complete with an addicting leveling system that hooked players into hundreds of hours of play. -Moose-Steak

When people talk about first-person shooters Call of Duty is always brought up. Although Call of Duty has always been based around World War II, Call of Duty 4 is the series’ first journey into modern day warfare and it is safe to say it is one of the best to date. Call of Duty 4 is an amazing game in every sense. The multiplayer is addicting and the single-player is deep and intense. The feeling of war is all around you as you sprint from firefight to firefight. A truly amazing depiction of modern day warfare. Featuring groundbreaking multiplayer and addicting single-player, Call of Duty 4 is arguably one of the best shooters to date and a fine addition to the MVPs’ top 100 games of all-time. -Brrnout

22. Metal Gear Solid

Publisher: Konami
Developer: Konami

Platform: PlayStation
Release: October 21, 1998

A game can be revolutionary to its genre and make a lasting impact to its fans, but few games can change the entire way you play video games. Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear Solid was a blitzkrieg on the video game industry when it was released in 1998. Here was a game with a storyline straight out of Hollywood, gameplay unlike anything gamers had ever seen, and so many quirks and oddities that have become a reference haven to gamers. Unrivaled enemy AI made it more than just like playing a movie, Metal Gear Solid was a movie, a movie that you just couldn’t turn away from. -GoodLuckSaturday

21. Final Fantasy XIII
Publisher: Square Enix
Developer: Square Enix
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: March 9, 2010

There was a lot riding on Final Fantasy XIII. Looking grand at one point, it was when Square Enix went multiplatform with the game that it took them much longer to finish its completion. The end result, while good, did not come quite near the grandness of earlier releases. Always a visionary leap, the thirteenth installment was kind of bland on the visual end. Environments were sort of "cheap," as the game was strictly modeled within linear environments. No more expansive world map. No more towns to visit, or townsfolk to draw tidbits from. The game had some beautiful CG... but it's not enough. Besides, the storyline distances players from the villains, creating a lack of personification for an entire cast of characters. Except for your band of heroes, who are of interest but the overall story (about your party being infected magic users, now hunted by government types) doesn't churn out the same level of "epic" as in other entries. Sound work includes both a strong cast and some okay orchestral scores, whereas the gameplay hasn't evolved much. Using a customizable order of rearrangeable classes, you'll prompt characters to fight how you want them to while distributing points into a growth of new abilities and more, which is a lot like Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XII before it. -GrayGargoyle

Aside from having to live up to the hype that accompanies the Final Fantasy series, Final Fantasy XIII also had to deal with the scrutiny of an infamously long development cycle and the expectations of being the first HD Final Fantasy game. In spite of this, Square Enix managed to turn out a high-quality product, even if it ruffled the tail feathers of many traditional Final Fantasy fans. Focusing in on a group of wanted criminals, Final Fantasy XIII logically did away with the series staple of open towns and frequent NPC interaction in favor of a more linear path, much like that of Final Fantasy X. However, Final Fantasy XIII benefited greatly from the improved technology, as the levels, despite their linearity, were much more varied and dynamic than those in Final Fantasy X, and a whole lot prettier. Of course, the game also opens up, as the reluctant heroes leave their inorganic safe-haven for the wilds of Gran Pulse, which gives way to the expected optional content, mainly in the form of exploration and hunts. The gameplay of Final Fantasy XIII, of course, is perhaps the most dramatic departure, eschewing the traditional turn-based systems as well as the system of its predecessor, Final Fantasy XII, which was quasi-real-time, allowing movement. While somewhat hard to grasp at first, the gameplay is surprisingly deep, at least requiring more input than the traditional "smash Attack to get through 90% of encounters" that is prevalent in the series. The game also features a rich, incredibly complex upgrade system for both character abilities and equipment. The overall narrative is not the best in the series, despite having a decent sense of sincerity, but the game does feature some surprisingly well-crafted, deep characters that are among the best the series has produced (even if there are some equally polarizing characters and less developed characters). It's not the best entry in the storied series, but you can definitely find worse. -ResidentZoidberg

20. Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King

Publisher: Square Enix

Developer: Level-5

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: November 15, 2005

Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King is a solid turn-based (Japanese) role-playing game. It does not have the most inspiring storyline in the world but its character development, gameplay, and sound design more than make up for this shortcoming. The gameplay in this video game is everything one could hope for in a turn-based (Japanese) role-playing game. Old-school video gamers who like traditional role-playing games will find themselves at home with this masterpiece. Players take control of the Hero (and the other members of the party of course) whose name will be determined from the onset. He has his own history but the character development that will be experienced in this video game comes more from the other characters than the Hero (at least throughout the main storyline). This is one of those video games with a silent protagonist and some individuals will undoubtedly see this as another shortcoming. With that being said, this quest boils down into a quest to save the world like many other traditional role-playing games. There are plenty of storyline elements that help to flesh out the plot, expand the story, build the characters, and keep players guessing but at the end of the day players will find themselves with very few (if any) unanswered questions. This is not the best role-playing game to recommend to newcomers or those individuals who are new to role-playing games, but those individuals who are looking for a quality turn-based (Japanese) role-playing game owe it to themselves to check out Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King. -SweetPoison13

19. Final Fantasy Chronicles

Publisher: Square Electronic Arts
Developer: Squaresoft

Platform: PlayStation
Release: June 29, 2001

Two of the greatest games from the 16-bit era are finally brought to PlayStation. Final Fantasy Chronicles includes both Chrono Trigger and Final Fantasy IV. Chrono Trigger is a cult classic and had its sequel made on PlayStation years after the original debuted on SNES. Final Fantasy IV, originally introduced to North America as Final Fantasy II, was another highly acclaimed RPG for it's time. Both titles were ported over to PlayStation and had new bonus features such as art galleries and cutscenes. These two masterpieces are surely some of the most influential role-playing games to date. -jasquarefan

18. God of War

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment

Developer: SCE Studios Santa Monica

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: March 22, 2005

God of War is a truly revolutionary game. Not only did it dig into the subject of Greek mythology (which few games have ever touched) but it also managed to make it insanely fun to play. Playing as Kratos as he seeks revenge on the gods of Olympus is really fun. Hacking and slashing your way through the countless alive and undead minions of the gods is amazing. God of War is great because it did something no one has ever done before and it was done so well that it created a fanbase so large that Kratos would be proud (or he would just kill us all... not sure which). The amazing storytelling, deep interpretation of Greek mythology, and varied activities made God of War an instant classic and a no-brainer for our Top 100 Games of All-Time list. -Brrnout

17. Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 4

Publisher: Atlus
Developer: Atlus

Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: December 9, 2008

Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 4 built itself off the success of its predecessor, Persona 3. Bringing back the social link system, improved combat, and many more features that Persona 3 left out, P4 became a highly acclaimed title for Atlus inside and outside of Japan. The plot revolves around solving a mystery in which the player must rescue people who have disappeared before the fog hits. It brought in brand new social links, improved features such as being able to control each character in combat and Shoji Meguro's unique musical score. The Persona series just keeps getting better. -jasquarefan

A string of unconventional and confusing murders has the city of Inaba up in arms. The protagonist (you, in this case), and his friends discover an alternate reality in the television set that may be connected to this unusual case. Inside the television, they meet Teddie, a creature who resembles a stuffed animal, who calls the television world his home. Together, they explore the television world and use their newfound power of the Persona to bring the killer to justice. Following on the heels of Persona 3's success, Persona 4 manages to deliver a fantastic RPG experience, while tending to some issues gamers had with Persona 3. A must-play for any RPG fan. -Weidleface

16. Chrono Cross
Publisher: Square Electronic Arts
Developer: Squaresoft
Platform: PlayStation
Release: August 15, 2000

Truly riveting. The sequel to the best RPG ever comes close to being the best game ever. A few notches down from the top in my book, Chrono Cross amazes in a larger nonlinear equation. In Chrono Trigger you could follow multiple paths at given points in any order you wanted, but here there are more than 80 characters in which to choose from to put on your team that will alter the way the game is played as you can play it several times and get several endings like you could in the first. A new color-coded battle system (black vs. white, blue vs. red, etc.) and stunning graphical and sound features all add to the legacy that Squaresoft's greatest classic has established. -GrayGargoyle

15. Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots

Publisher: Konami

Developer: Kojima Productions

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: June 12, 2008

A truly fitting sendoff for a fairly historic franchise and its legendary hero, Metal Gear Solid 4 is a masterpiece, bringing the franchise into "next-gen" with an improved control scheme while maintaining the remarkable depth the games are known for. Along with that, it also brings a completely incomprehensible (joking), yet poignant, stirring, and emotional plot; Kojima navigates a cluttered mythos with the skill of a contortionist, expertly wrapping up the series. The visuals are as impressive as the game’s separate installs are infamous, remarkably realistic in every capacity, while the soundtrack is expectedly unbelievable (such as the haunting guitar in "Old Snake") and the voice-acting is topnotch. The game is also infamous, of course, for its long cutscenes, which are expertly directed and fantastic all-around (admittedly, the game’s final cutscene had me bawling my eyes out for some time). Of course, Kojima doesn’t solely rely on cutscenes to convey emotion, character development, etc. – a particularly difficult walk down a long hallway was among the most trying, painful moments in the game. Something else to note, the game also happens to feature what I consider one of the best final boss fights in video game history. So fitting, so epic (and I don’t use that term loosely). The culmination of so many years of intrigue was perfectly paced, incredibly fun to play, rich in gameplay depth and variance, perfect on a technical level, and surprisingly well written and poignant. And let’s not forget that Metal Gear Online, packed in with the game, was no slouch itself (except that Konami codes were needless and clunky), though perhaps not in line with the twitch shooter/lone wolf style of play that most online gamers adapt. -ResidentZoidberg

14. Valkyria Chronicles
Publisher: SEGA
Developer: SEGA
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: November 4, 2008

This completely underrated gem was one I prayed would make this list, because it is one of the freshest, most rewarding titles to come out in a long while (particularly from Japan). A unique strategy-RPG set in an alternate 1930’s Europe, Valkyria Chronicles focuses on a ragtag militia of a small, neutral nation caught between two warring superpowers. The story is told through a book – which serves as the main hub – written after the war, chronicling the events, while the game itself is presented with uniquely cel-shaded (almost water-colored) visuals. The vibrancy is powerful, yet interestingly in juxtaposition with the surprisingly heavy, poignant narrative (not that the game is without its quirks and humor, mind you – it has those in spades). The main characters are surprisingly realistic and surprisingly well developed, while even the extra squad mates that fill your ranks on the field are fully voiced, each with their own distinctive personalities, which makes losing them in battle surprisingly emotional, should you fail to rescue a fallen comrade. Valkyria Chronicles features a surprisingly poignant war narrative, while focusing in convincingly on the cast to add a sincere "human element" to the already tragic tale. Coupled with a distinct visual style and unique strategic gameplay, Valkyria Chronicles is a prime example of a much too common occurrence –a stellar, fresh title being well received critically while returning less than stellar sales figures. A true underrated gem, buy it new if you can find it and hopefully we’ll receive PS3 sequel. -ResidentZoidberg

13. LittleBigPlanet
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Media Molecule
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: October 28, 2008

Play. Create. Share. This little motto was taken to unbelievable lengths in LittleBigPlanet, one of the best platforming experiences in gaming history (note: history. Even when platforming was gaming). I often feel that, purely as a "game", and what it means to be "a game," few honestly beat out LittleBigPlanet…but that might only make sense to me. Regardless, LittleBigPlanet is instantly captivating with its adorably unique visual flair, but the gameplay mechanics beneath that vibrant, colorful veneer are equally impressive. The developer-made levels, frankly, would’ve been enough to warrant a purchase. However, where LittleBigPlanet truly innovates is the creation mode, where users have access to all of the tools that the developer had in order to craft their own created levels, which can then be published and played online. With over two-million levels currently available for play online – some of them remarkably unique, some of them unbelievably polished, some of them short, some of them hilarious, some of them frightening, and some even better, perhaps, than the developer levels, this is just about the archetypal never-ending game. It’s an incredibly endearing game with a knack for creation, boasting one of the most fun local and online multiplayer components around. Just try and play the game without a smile creeping its way across your face as adorable, customizable Sackpeople traverse equally adorable – often adorably perilous – locales, smacking each other along the way and wearing a range of too-cute facial expressions. I dare you. Oh, and the scariest thing? LittleBigPlanet 2 is, somehow, actually looking to blow the first away in every respect! -ResidentZoidberg

12. Shadow of the Colossus
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: SCE Studios Japan
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: October 18, 2005


The go-to game for the "Games as Art" discussion, Shadow of the Colossus is a remarkably unique, deep experience. Tasked with dispatching sixteen enormous, lumbering beasts (referred to as "Colossi") by an ominous, non-physical entity called Dormin in an effort to revive a beautiful girl, gamers are thrown into the shoes of Wander and his faithful horse, Agro, with very little set up. There is a strong sense of ambiguity to this game, where little is explained and almost no dialogue is offered, other than that of Dormin’s echoing quasi-narration. What are these beasts? Why am I slaying them? Is Dormin trustworthy? The game is decidedly minimalistic in offering answers to these questions, which only adds to the emotional attachment and immersion. Defeating a colossus, after the initial adrenaline rush of your first fallen giant, becomes suddenly solemn and depressing. The game world – the Forbidden Land – is just unbelievably atmospheric and arresting, as Wander and his faithful horse traverse the beautifully uninhabited, silent world (though the game has a beautiful and heart-pounding musical score and great ambient sounds). It’s an atmosphere difficult to capture in words, but so easy to become invested in. One colossi encounter even had me too terrified to continue forward – undoubtedly my most frightening moment in gaming history, namely because it was primarily on a psychological level (I literally spent a good hour still completely focused and playing the game wholeheartedly, yet refusing to progress forward). Shadow of the Colossus is a game that, in short, simply has to be experienced. And it’s an incredibly arresting and emotional experience, one that may have yet to be equaled and one that is perfectly capable of shaking your very foundation and rocking you to your core. The game is beautiful, somber, mystifying, awe-inspiring, terrifying, and more. A true masterpiece. -ResidentZoidberg

11. Uncharted: Drake's Fortune
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Naughty Dog Software
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: November 20, 2007

As one of those types of games that do something new by blending together a diverse variety of elements, Uncharted is most notably a stir between the likes of the Xbox 360's sensation, Gears of War, and the venerable Tomb Raider franchise. Between ducking for cover behind pillars, crates, risen land, and more, as explorer Nathan Drake who is seeking the fortune of his supposed relative, a pirate by the name of Sir Francis Drake, you'll be trading a barrage of bullets against modern day pirates and mercenaries. Finding solutions to puzzles around tombs, making daring escapes over jeep and waterborne vehicles, combining firefights with platform escapades, and breathing in all of the jungle-licious sights and sounds, this is truly one of the finest gaming experiences out there. -GrayGargoyle

Many Jak and Daxter fans, I’m sure, were a bit disappointed (or furious, even) to find that Naughty Dog’s efforts with the PlayStation 3 were focusing on some new IP, not Jak and Daxter or even perhaps Crash Bandicoot related. In fact, no adorable fuzzy critters to speak of! Guns, pirates, and blood? Let’s be glad any furious fan mail Naughty Dog received was ignored, because the fruits of this adventurous, divergent excursion were oh-so sweet. Maybe it’s the lifelong Indiana Jones fan in me, but I was wide-eyed when I first read Game Informer’s preview for Uncharted, and I KNEW we had a bona-fide hit on our hands (among the PlayStation 3’s first). Gorgeous, luscious visuals and incredible mo-cap technology not only displayed what the PS3 was truly capable of, but it lent itself greatly to some of the most relatable, believable characters that the industry had ever seen – who didn’t see the clear sense of dread and trepidation on Nate’s face when he had to jump out of the burning plane? The tech, of course, worked in conjunction with topnotch writing – sharp, sarcastic, and witty dialogue worked to the strengths of an organic voice acting cast, while the plot, dare I say it, rivaled Indy’s adventures. Oh, and the third-person gunplay and platforming was exceptionally well done, too – fun to play and unbelievably fluid (thanks in great part to an insane amount of unique animations). And it had an amazing orchestral score on top of all of that! There’s a reason this game gets so much praise, and it isn’t because you could go into a pool of water, see the wetness on Nate’s clothing, dry off a little, then go in part way again, coming out to see the different levels of wetness on Nate (the water effects were – and are – the absolute best ever). But that didn’t stop me from doing it whenever possible. Yes, Dr. Jones would be proud. Maybe a little jealous. Me? I was wide-eyed with the realization of what this generation of games could bring, while completely absorbed and amazed by this adventure. I was almost always smiling when I played the game (except when the narrative entreated otherwise). -ResidentZoidberg

10. Resident Evil 4

Publisher: Capcom

Developer: Capcom

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: October 25, 2005

Resident Evil 4 is a great video game for individuals who are looking for a decent introduction to the survival-horror genre. Its third-person shooter elements make it extremely accessible to most video gamers and its survival-horror elements are just "scary" enough that it will not repel even those who are overly sensitive to fear. Survival-horror veterans will need to look elsewhere if they wish to satiate their appetite for horror as Resident Evil 4 is not a terribly "scary" video game, but most video gamers who like third-person shooter titles or action/adventure titles should be able to find something to appreciate here. Players make their way through a remote location in Europe as Leon S. Kennedy in search of a missing person (the President’s daughter). Things take a turn for the worse when Leon discovers that the residents (among other things) are out to get him. Will Leon be able to find who he is looking for? Is there more to this remote location than meets the eye? Does Leon really want to find out what that is? Resident Evil 4 is not representative of its predecessors but it is hard to deny the sheer quality of this video game. Everything from its gameplay (the attaché case and the over-the-shoulder camera) to its replay value (the mini-games and New Round options) is topnotch. -SweetPoison13

9. BioShock

Publisher: 2K Games

Developer: 2K Games

Platform: PlayStation 3

Release: October 21, 2008

If you asked me to describe BioShock in one sentence I would have to smack you since a feat like that would give BioShock no justice at all. It's hard to describe exactly why BioShock is such an amazing game since every part of the game is amazingly well thought through. As you go through the dead and decaying city of Rapture, you find that not everything in this city is falling apart, although most of the people are. As you travel, you truly feel like you are trapped in this cage under the ocean. Going from one part of the city to the other, you see and hear all that has happened making it impossible not to be on the edge of your seat within 10 minutes! With an intense story, amazing graphical prowess, deep and immersive gameplay, and engaging characters it's easy to see why this was one of our best games of all-time. -Brrnout

8. Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty
Publisher: Konami
Developer: Konami JPN (KCEJ)
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: November 13, 2001

Honestly, I can say that Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty features the most epic qualities imaginable on just about any and all fronts. Like Metal Gear Solid before it, Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty reinvents the definition of stealth-action tenfold. Here, you'll traverse heavily guarded enemy territory in a third-person state that effectively gives the game's protagonist Solid Snake the full potential of his surroundings. With some of the generation's best visuals and sounds on all accords, memorable bosses and stages, high replay value (with tons of dog tags to collect), and a highly unexpected twist on the storyline, this all makes for an unbeatably winning combination of legendary gaming bliss. Hideo, you genius, you! -GrayGargoyle

7. Final Fantasy IX

Publisher: Square Electronic Arts

Developer: Squaresoft

Platform: PlayStation

Release: Nov. 14, 2000

Zidane Tribal, a member of a band of thieves called Tantalus, sets off with his fellow thieves to kidnap Princess Garnet til Alexandros XVII, but things take a strange turn when they discover that the Princesss actually wants to be kidnapped herself. Upon escaping the city of Alexandria after being pursued by Queen Brahne, Zidane, Garnet, and a host of others set off to discover the cause behind the Queen's sudden lust for power. Final Fantasy IX is the final entry in the series before it made its move to the PlayStation 2, and it couldn’t have gone out with more of a bang. A fun, cartoony art style, a cast of lovable and genuine characters, and a stellar soundtrack are just a few things this game has to offer for RPG fans. -Weidleface

Final Fantasy IX was an important title for the series. Being developed alongside Final Fantasy VIII, it took a different direction than the others developed on PlayStation. Being the last title to be released for PlayStation, before the inevitable move to PlayStation 2, this was Hironobu Sakaguchi's last Final Fantasy title that he was the producer for. Heavily influenced by the original Final Fantasy, FFIX took on a more traditional setting and used the very familiar Active Time Battle system that was first introduced in Final Fantasy IV. FFIX did however introduce new features such as Active Time Events and the Mognet system. Final Fantasy IX is a very memorable title within Final Fantasy and a great send off to the series’ creator. -jasquarefan

6. Kingdom Hearts

Publisher: Square Electronic Arts

Developer: Squaresoft/Disney Interactive Studios

Platform: PlayStation 2

Release: September 17, 2002

New to the PS2 was an action-RPG created by Squaresoft titled Kingdom Hearts. The game became a huge success in part because it appealed to gamers across a wide age spectrum. Kingdom Hearts took a risk at blending favorite Disney characters as well as an equal number of original characters, all involved in a Final Fantasy-esque plotline. The result was an overwhelming fanbase and thumbs way up from the critics. The game has so far spawned one direct sequel and a handful of solid spin-off titles. -DAXRULZ

5. Final Fantasy VIII

Publisher: Square Electronic Arts

Developer: Squaresoft

Platform: PlayStation

Release: September 9, 1999

I don't care what everyone else thinks. Final Fantasy VII is no way, no how my favorite Final Fantasy game. Neither is Final Fantasy III, a.k.a. Final Fantasy VI (its real title). Final Fantasy VIII has the best video game romance of all-time, some of the best and most memorable songs, smoother graphics than the super-deformed ones in the previous installment, and the series' most addictive card mini-game. The game's Junction battle system may be overwhelming at first, but once you get into it, it's really one of the most thought-provoking mechanics ever conceived for hardcore RPG fans to appreciate. -GrayGargoyle

Final Fantasy VIII is a relatively intriguing experience for those individuals who are looking for something different from the role-playing game genre. Many individuals would argue that Final Fantasy VIII had big shoes to fill given the success of its predecessor and many individuals might argue that it was unable to fill these shoes. With that being said, this remains a heavily debated topic among Final Fantasy fans. The storyline in Final Fantasy VIII centers heavily on the characters and their relationships with one another. Only through their experiences do players see the storyline come to life and boil down into a save-the-world affair. It can be argued that

Final Fantasy VIII is not the role-playing game to recommend to individuals who are new to the role-playing game genre given its Junction System, its Draw System, and the ways in which players can manage their party but it remains a solid role-playing game despite some of the statements that are out there. Final Fantasy VIII delivers a memorable experience with an unforgettable soundtrack and some of the most unique gameplay mechanics in a Final Fantasy video game to date. -SweetPoison1

4. Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3

Publisher: Atlus
Developer: Atlus

Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: August 14, 2007

Atlus’ Shin Megami Tensei had slowly garnered a small but devout following by the time the third installment of the Persona series was announced. Featuring a slick and stylish character set with enough edge to question a possible localization, the game was bubbling to an explosion upon its release in 2007. Unlike most RPGs, which take place in far away worlds, Persona 3 took place in the everyday world, as the protagonist doesn’t only have to save his world, but has to juggle that with his everyday life of schoolwork, school clubs, and friendship. The game’s exciting battle system and storyline forced Atlus to re-release the game the following year in an expanded format. Even in the wake of the PlayStation 3, the breakout hit was a huge push for the aging PlayStation 2, and has established one of the genre’s biggest followings. -GoodLuckSaturday

3. Uncharted 2: Among Thieves
Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Naughty Dog Software
Platform: PlayStation 3
Release: October 13, 2009

Previously in this countdown, I had nothing but glowing things to say about Uncharted 2: Among Thieves’ predecessor, Drake’s Fortune. I made it sound like one of the best experiences (not gaming) I’ve ever had, period. And I stand by that. So if you did not already know, you might just be astounded to find out that Naughty Dog somehow upped their game in every possible way for the sequel, which is why this arguably perfect title is sitting pretty at number three on this list of the best PlayStation games ever. The visuals, somehow, got better – in many regards, they’ve yet to be topped. The state-of-the-art water effects were upped with state-of-the-art snow. The writing got even sharper, the plot filled with even more intrigue, more drama, more comedy, and more fantastic set pieces and segments. The soundtrack even got more amazing, chilling, and memorable! Oh, and Naughty Dog threw in a legitimately unique, well-crafted multiplayer and co-op component. You’re welcome. If Drake’s Fortune left me perpetually wide-eyed and in a state of bliss, to the outside observer watching me play Among Thieves, I must’ve seemed to have transcended physical being and reached a state of pure nirvana. I could go on and on about all this exceptional title has to offer, but my actual review of the game was long-winded enough. The game simply "got it right" in every facet of development, all the while offering up a narrative that blows many film and Hollywood offerings right out of the water. Tight and varied gameplay, clever and organic dialogue, absolutely jaw-dropping visuals, fluid animation, sharp and realistic writing, brilliant pacing and an emotional final act, lovable characters, unparalleled levels of production… I think I’ve made my point. The copious amounts of "Game of the Year" awards were undoubtedly deserved. Oh, and just the mention of "the train sequence" is enough to send chills up and down my spine! -ResidentZoidberg

2. Final Fantasy X
Publisher: Square Electronic Arts
Developer: Squaresoft
Platform: PlayStation 2
Release: December 18, 2001

As the first Final Fantasy game to move into the PlayStation 2 era, Final Fantasy X has ultimately become the best RPG of that particular generation. Tracing away again from the medieval-style period of most Final Fantasy games the tenth installment is more like the eighth in its own type of modernized era. In fact, the game takes place 1,000 years after the game's main character is transported into the future by the destructive creature known as Sin. Final Fantasy X's beauty runs deeper than that, though, through its amazing visuals, classic soundtrack, and what I feel is the best combat system integrated into any Final Fantasy release. Now with the chance to replace characters in your party with ones that are not in your party strategically, Final Fantasy X is one of the most extremely enjoyable RPGs you'll love for the appetizing aspects and stay for the dynamic plot twists. -GrayGargoyle

1. Final Fantasy VII

Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
Developer: Squaresoft

Platform: PlayStation
Release: September 7, 1997

Widely heralded as one of the greatest games of all-time, Final Fantasy VII is the PlayStation MVP program's choice for #1 PlayStation title, and with good reason. The game was Squaresoft's first attempt at a 3D entry in the franchise, which was an explosive success to say the least. The game featured a unique story with a slew of characters that would go down into history as some of the most memorable characters in videogames. With a luscious 3D world to explore and an epic score composed by Nobuo Uematsu, it comes as no surprise why this game is at the top of our list. -DAXRULZ

Seeing Final Fantasy VII as number one in the MVP’s "Top 100 Greatest PlayStation Games of All Time" thread should not come as a surprise to anyone. Aside from the fact that MVPs as a whole are made up of a core of RPG enthusiasts, Final Fantasy VII’s impact on the gaming scene and PlayStation brand is undeniable. The classic series famously jumped shipped with upstart Sony and the PlayStation 1, and the result was a resounding success. Final Fantasy VII is noted as the game that brought RPGs to the mainstream, uniting enthusiast and newcomers alike, as well as introducing games (or RPGs) to the significantly large group of people that cut their teeth on this ambitious, disc-based console. But, let’s put historical impact aside for a moment –the game wasn’t a critical success for no reason. Amazing 3D visuals (I would say "for their time," but I’m an oddball and still think they look fantastic) coupled with gorgeous, awe-inspiring CG scenes hooked players in immediately – its opening train sequence is unforgettable – while the somewhat "steampunk" fantasy setting, intriguing characters, strong narrative, and deep, rewarding gameplay kept them coming back for more. And I’d be remiss if I failed to mention the outstanding musical compositions, with unbelievable resonating, emotional, and iconic tracks (easily among my favorite game soundtracks to date). Yes, Final Fantasy VII was a perfect storm. It had it all, and at the right time. Without explicitly describing one of the most famous, unexpected scenes in videogame history, it was even likely among the first games that ever led gamers to shed a tear out of pure emotional attachment to the characters in the game. Able to retain its relevance for years and live up to all of its praise, Final Fantasy VII is, indeed, the finest PlayStation videogame. -ResidentZoidberg

Spoony Bard

Please use plain text.
Message 1 of 35 (3,365 Views)
Fender Bender
Registered: 04/02/2001
Offline
3566 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 26, 2011

Cmon...what happened to Ninja Gaiden Sigma (Black Edition) That was a phenom....

Photobucket
Photobucket
Please use plain text.
Message 2 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
PlayStation MVP
Registered: 04/26/2007
Online
10869 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 27, 2011

Why isn't one game not toppling so many other picks? It's simple: a game requires votes to be featured on the list. With a single person actually voting on Ninja Gaiden Sigma (and the second one), that was not enough to grant either title from the franchise a position.

By comparison, Final Fantasy VII was sitting somewhere amidst the majority of peoples' voting ballots. That's how it came to be number one. Unfortunately, not everyone's favorites are going to appear here, as the 'MVP Top 100' are essentially a combined effort of all our personal picks from which games we cherished the most all these years. We can all wish the list turned out differently to reflect our own personalized choices, but that's what makes this project interesting... is that it's not just the voice of one person making this list what it is, it's from all of the MVPs who had a say.


Please use plain text.
Message 3 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
Lombax Warrior
Registered: 09/23/2008
Offline
103 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 27, 2011

The Jak and Daxter games where the best! Also GTA San Andreas was the best GTA.

Please use plain text.
Message 4 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
First Son
Registered: 01/28/2011
Offline
1 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 28, 2011

what i dont get is how one game apears multiple time in the the list like final fantasy XII appears as number one and 33. Whats up with that?

Please use plain text.
Message 5 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
Hekseville Citizen
Registered: 08/13/2010
Offline
396 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 28, 2011

I have played playstation games a long time and I'm glad Final Fantasy Tactics made the list.  I love the character developement in that game. Warhawk should be on this list.  It's the best online game I've ever played.

Photobucket
Please use plain text.
Message 6 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
PlayStation MVP
Registered: 03/31/2005
Offline
7852 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 28, 2011

Lazurillian wrote:

what i dont get is how one game apears multiple time in the the list like final fantasy XII appears as number one and 33. Whats up with that?

Look a little closer. FF VII (7) is number one. FF XII (12) is number 33.

Photobucket
Currently Playing: Final Fantasy X HD, inFAMOUS: Second Son
Please use plain text.
Message 7 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
Uncharted Territory
Registered: 02/02/2010
Offline
1881 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 29, 2011

Very nice list!  Although, were it my list, I would switch a couple things around and maybe make a couple swaps, but it's still very solid at any rate.  But reading through it kinda made me sad when I came to the realization that I've already played a sizable number of these titles.  Looks like my time on this planet is running out! Hmmm... Maybe I'll save a couple of the shorter ones for when I'm in my 80s... or skip one altogether. Thus is the road to immortality laid out before me!

Please use plain text.
Message 8 of 35 (3,365 Views)
Keyblade Wielder
Registered: 05/24/2009
Offline
9918 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 29, 2011

FINAL FANTASY VII as #1, damn straight. Glad to see Kingdom Hearts in the top 10 as well. Disappointed you ranked Uncharted 2 so high though.

Please use plain text.
Message 9 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes
PlayStation MVP
Registered: 03/17/2007
Online
28060 posts
 

Re: 100 Games to Play Before You Die; The MVPs' Top 100 PlayStation Games

Jan 30, 2011

Xajen1 wrote:

FINAL FANTASY VII as #1, damn straight. Glad to see Kingdom Hearts in the top 10 as well. Disappointed you ranked Uncharted 2 so high though.


The Chronicle: PlayStation Community Magazine
Roger the Alien: "Steve, look at those kids. They're athletes. When was the last time you ran anywhere? I mean with your own legs, not by pressing 'X'."

Uncharted 2 is the greatest game to come out this generation. The experience alone makes it worthy to be number 3.

I've only played 33 games on this list.....

Please use plain text.
Message 10 of 35 (3,365 Views)
0 Likes