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Apr 14 2012
By: TSD_-RAVEN- Lombax Warrior 124 posts
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ROUTER PORT FORWARDING, TRIGGERING, & QoS SETUP FOR KILLZONE 2, KILLZONE 3, PS3 & PSN

[ Edited ]
78 replies 61569 views Edited Apr 3, 2013

 

 

Going through many of these posts it's apparent that not everyone has the specific PS3 and PSN Port settings setup on their various Routers, which is absolutely necessary for online gaming with most games, those which have team based communications, and especially Sony published ones. For an online game like Killzone, certain Router ports must be open both ways, and some settings must be enabled in order for proper PS3-PS3 communication to take place. If you're experiencing drops and lags more often than not (once or twice a week or more), then you need to ensure your Router is properly setup. Except in games where the Host has left and game transfer isn't smooth due to not finding a suitable replacement host, or in games where it's been terminated by the host, you should not have any frequent Network errors or drops if your Router is configured properly. I typically will play KZ2 or COD for extended hours at a time, without any network problems, other than those I mentioned which are infrequent. If you don't know how to do it, it's not that difficult, but if you don't want to learn, then you're the bullet sponges for the rest of us who have already and those that will. With proper Router setup the only reason you should be dropped is due to the gaming server itself, not because your Router isn't communicating properly with it. When set properly, you should be able to game for hours with no drops, as I do.

 

 

There is specific Port data that you need to have setup on your Router for PS3-PS3 online communications. Next time you get an error, go to your Network Settings and run a status - I'd bet that your Network Address Translation (NAT) level shows a blank. You need to maintain at least a NAT level of 2 in order to maintain a proper connection for the PSN network and online gaming between PS3's. Many people will setup their network and see a NAT level 2, and assume it's there all the time. But if your Router, PS3 or network isn't properly setup, it will go away when you try to communicate with another PS3 - connecting to an online multiplayer game, chat, etc.

 

 

Contrary to what some think, the NAT level is not a specific setting that you can adjust. NAT must be enabled on your Router, as well as UPnP (Plug 'n Play). The NAT level you see in the Network Status you run on your PS3 is an indication of how well your system is communicating. However, if you run a status and see a NAT level 2 before beginning any online games, chats, etc., it's misleading - only after you begin online communication with another PS3 will your true NAT level be revealed. And realistically, if it's not a NAT level 2, you're not going to be connected anyway. This is apparent when you think you've got a NAT 2, but can't seem to initiate an online chat between yourself and other PS3 users. If it happens, check your NAT setting immediately after it happens - many times it's a NAT problem.

 

 

There is also specific Port data for certain games - COD for instance, and SOCOM both have their own separate Port Data requirements for optimum play online. SOCOM and Killzone are both Sony published games, so the Port data listed here is good for both game titles. COD isn't though, and has its own specific data. For such data you need to contact the game publisher or check their site. Most of them will give you the data if you email them or call.

 

Here is the basic PS3/PSN Port Configuration Data for Sony published games and the Playstation Network. You can either set it up as a Port Forward, or Port Trigger, or as a QoS Online Game entry. I prefer Port Triggering and QoS.

 

 

If you're unfamiliar with Router setups, then go to your router manufacturer site and go to their support area. Many have basic networking tutorials, and the manual for your router will show you where the settings are. For those who have Linksys Routers, I have added my own particular WRT600N Dual-Band N Router settings, including the Port Range / Port Trigger data I've added below.

 

For all PLAYSTATION(R)3 format software titles published by Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) (including Killzone 2)

 

 

ROUTER NAT AND UPnP MODES - ENABLED

 

*Note: Make sure to enable these TCP/UDP ports in BOTH directions (i.e, for Routers that have TCP, UDP, and Both for settings, set them to Both. If your Router doesn't have that type of setting, set the Port to either TCP or UDP as indicated, and enable the pass-through in both directions (full duplex))


TCP Ports: 10070 - 10080
UDP Ports: 10070 Voice Chat: UDP 6000-7000, 10070 (for headset operation) Remote Play via Access Point: TCP 9293


PLAYSTATION Network: TCP Ports: 80, 443, 5223 UDP Ports: 3478, 3479, 3658

 

It's easier to use Port Range Forwarding or Triggering instead of Single Port Forwarding. In those cases where there isn't a range but only a single port listed, your range is the same port, e.g., Range 5223-5223 for Port 5223. Port Triggering is also preferable to Port Forwarding, since Triggering relies on the game or application in question to trigger the Port request when necessary to the Router. Static Port Forwarding setups keep your Ports open as long as they are enabled in the Router setting, and as such are more vulnerable. Trigger Ports are only open as long as the game or application needs them to be open.

 

Below are screen shots of my own Router setup for both Port Triggering and Port Range Forwarding. Note the Destination IP is the IP address of my PS3. Note that the name can be anything you wish - I use the Trigger range.

 

PORT TRIGGERING

 

Port Triggering Example Linksys WRT600N

 

 

 

Port Range Forwarding setting example:

 

 

PORT RANGE FORWARDING

Note that the Ports that aren't enabled are already set for Port Triggering, since they are the Ports most actively used by the PS3 and Sony Games like Killzone, Call of Duty, etc. Since Battlefield 1943 is an EA game, and I don't play it as often, it's currently set for Port Range Forwarding. Remember again that you can use whatever you wish for the name.

 

Port Forwarding Screenshot, WRT600N

 

 

 

Quality of Service setup is pretty easy - you just need the MAC address of the device you wish to have priority access to the Router, which in this case is your PS3 or its adapter. Some applications, such as Skype, may already be added to your Router's QoS application list, as is mine. This is why there isn't any data next to my Skype entry, since its settings are part of the Router firmware, and need only be selected. Many online games are also included with Router QoS settings - World of Warcraft and The Sims are 2 of many games whose settings are already loaded into my particular Router's QoS selection list.

 

Quality of Service (QoS) Setting Example

 

QoS Setting Example, WRT600N

 

FIREWALLS

 

How Do I Get Around My Firewall?
--------------------------------------------
If your PC or your router has a firewall, the easiest way to circumvent this problem is to connect
your Ethernet cable directly from your cable or DSL modem to the PLAYSTATION 3 system.

If this option does not work, it is possible to configure your firewall to allow online traffic for
your PLAYSTATION 3.

If you are able to create a successful network configuration file, but unable to connect to any game
servers, verify that the firewall setup within your network is not preventing a valid connection.
If your firewall is preventing a valid connection, you have several options:

1. Configure your firewall to allow information to flow in from the ports mentioned above.


2. If you are using a router, configure your router to run the PLAYSTATION 3 connection through a
DMZ (de-militarized zone). DMZ configures your firewall in such a way that it places your
PLAYSTATION 3 console outside of your firewall. A PLAYSTATION 3 in a DMZ can use and receive the
entire Internet without any restrictions. (Caution: DMZ is not protected by a firewall.)


3. If you are not using a router, you may want to contact your Internet Service Provider (ISP) to
see if there is anything on their network that can be adjusted to allow your connection.

If you do not have a firewall, please check with your ISP to verify there are no connection
limitations. Also, you may want to ask if your ISP blocks certain Internet port ranges and supply
them with the UDP and TCP port ranges in this email for verification.

IMPORTANT: Only advanced users or network administrators should attempt configuring firewalls. Sony
does not recommend modifying your firewall unless you know exactly how it works. Each firewall is
different and may require some type of custom setup.

It may be best to contact the manufacturer of the device (i.e. router) or publisher of the software
(i.e. Norton, Sygate, etc.) for information on how to properly configure your firewall to allow
online traffic for your PLAYSTATION 3.

 

We also have additional information available on our website which may be helpful to you. Please
visit the "Online Gaming" section of PlayStation.com by clicking on the following link:

http://www.us.playstation.com/Games/Online

 

We would also recommend the following Knowledge Base articles that relate to this topic:

Firewall port information Troubleshoot wireless (Wi-Fi) network connections Troubleshoot wired (Ethernet) network connections

 

 

Additional Assistance - Consumer Services Department at (800) 345-7669. Monday through Saturday 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m., and
Sunday 7:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m., Pacific Standard Time.

 

 


Note: I've inserted the text from my second message which has the particular setup data for a standard Linksys N or Dual-Band N Router, with Port Range & Port Triggering Setup and instructions on how to tune your Router better, and links to sites where you can find good information on Networking if you're not up to speed on it. RAVEN 4/26


 

Unfortunately, I can't help those who do not wish to take the basic responsibility to learn how to access their router and make the basic port settings necessary to get optimum speeds and to make it work properly. This isn't Rocket Science, and I used to be one. It is not that difficult to learn how to setup your Router. . Computers and Network devices are not toasters or refrigerators - you cannot just plug them in, and expect them to work perfectly without any knowledge or maintenance required, though fully 80% of people treat them like that. Wired Ethernet is not as fast as wireless, though some might think so. Radio works at the speed of light - wired connections are limited by the conductor and connections they''re hooked to.

 

All Router manufacturers have basic tutorials on how to access and setup your Router. There is also a very good site that has good definitions and explanations on the different networking terms. The site is Broadband DSLReports. For Linksys owners, they have an excellent tutorial system on the Support sect...

 

 

If you can't deal with learning that, I suggest you take up something less mental - like Ping Pong, maybe.

 

ILikeMonkeys, always good to see you online playing KZ-2. You're both a great team player and opponent, especially in light of all of the idiots that seemed to have joined the crowd lately. Yes, these settings are right from the good folks at Sony - you can also find it at the PS3 information links there. The QOS information is from me as it helps your data move faster. Like when I frag your a$$ during a KZ2 match....

 

Another good article I came across recently might help those of you who don't understand how throughput speeds are attained and what affects them. For example, many don't know that a badly fragmented drive will affect your speed as well. Most defrag utilities aren't good enough because they don't defrag the paging/index file, since it can only be done before Windows starts. The program we use in the IT industry is called Diskeeper - the current version is great as it runs as a background process.

 

The article on throughput is here: UNDERSTANDING THROUGHPUT

 

There are some Network drops on KZ2 that are strictly KZ Server related - Error 3 is a good one, and there are some for long term inactivity. If you have setup your router properly with the PSN port data, you shouldn't have any port errors for some time. I usually play for many, many hours without an interruption. By "many hours", I've been known to play for 20 hours or more at a stretch, and with no errors.

 

If anyone has a Linksys Wireless N or Dual-Band Wireless N Router and wishes the settings from my personal Linksys 600N Dual-Band, I've added the setups from my Router below. There is also one other bit of information that will increase your PS3's wireless speed significantly, but I won't post it publicly here. Some things are best kept private, though I'm sure there are those that already know what to do. That's for Dual-Band owners only, so if you're interested, PM me with you Linksys DBN Router model #.

Prior to the procedures below, go to Linksys Support, look up your Router, then download the latest firmware update. If it's the same as what you have, then download that. Linksys Support Standard Procedure for any Linksys Router problem with speed or signal begins with flashing the firmware prior to adjusting any other settings. I've added settings for your Router to match your adapter since I have the same hardware.



You can look for your Router's firmware update here:
Linksys Support

 

Enter your Model # and go from there to get the firmware update.


The following assumes you have a Linksys Single Band or Dual-Band Wireless N Router; though these settings are from my Linksys WRT600N Dual-Band, the Admin Panel is the same, except for the extra 5ghz Band setup on mine.

Just in case, I've also added the 5ghz settings. Note that these settings are for use with an external DBN Adapter connected to the PS3, which is setup to match the Router settings.

 

On your Router:

Access the Router Admin Panel & Wireless Settings from your Browser - http://192.168.1.1/BasicWirelessSettings.htm

Note that if you've never accessed your Router's Admin Panel before, the default User/PW is admin for both. This is posted on the Linksys site and is common knowledge. You should ALWAYS change your password immediately.



1. Click on the Administration link in the Admin Panel - it's on the right hand side.

2. At the very bottom, click on Backup Configurations -save the file to a convenient location on your drive. If you don't save your configuration, you'll have to setup your Router all over again if you've already made any custom changes.

The flashing process restores the Router to its default configuration.

3. After backing up the configuration, click on Firmware Upgrade (top right under Administration)

4. Where it says Select a File to upgrade, browse to the update you downloaded, then start the flashing process (flash means install).

5. After the process is completed, and still under the Administration tab, click on the Management link on the left side.

6. At the bottom, click on Restore Configurations. Go to the file you backed up earlier.

7. Check the following are enabled (check box checked) -
UPnP (Plug 'n Play).

8. If you wish to have the ability to change your Router settings from your notebook via wireless connection, enable the following under Management also:

Web Access - Enable both HTTP and Web Utility Access via Wireless.

Remote Access - Remote Management - Enabled, Web Utility Access - HTTP, Remote Upgrade - Disabled (enable if you want remote firmware upgrade ability, e.g. another computer on your network wirelessly connected),

Allow Remote IP Address - Any IP Address,

 

Remote Management Port -8080.

UPnP - UPnP MUST BE Enabled for PS3's,

 

Allow Users to Configure - Enable

Allow Users to Disable Internet Access - Disabled.


Click on "Save Settings" at the bottom of the window, and wait for the Router to complete the save. If you don't and you go to another panel, the settings will have to be done again.

After that, click on the Wireless tab, and Basic Wireless Settings.

WIRELESS MODE SETTINGS

 

2.4ghz Wireless Network Settings

1. Network Mode: Wireless N (Note: if you have wireless G devices on your network, then set your Network Mode to Mixed. ONLY use N if ALL YOUR NETWORK DEVICES are wireless N.)

 

2. Network Name (SSID) - Set to a unique name that you can recognize. Enable in checkbox at the bottom to broadcast.

3. Radio Band - 20mhz Standard Channel

4. Wide Channel - Auto (DFS)

5. Standard Channel - Should be grayed out.

6. SSID Broadcast - Enabled

Having a unique SSID broadcasted ensure that you or your family won't accidentally connect to a neighbor's network that may have a Linksys Router,

but didn't change the default SSID from "Linksys". With today's N routers and their ranges, it's easy to pick up another neighbor's network.


FOR DUAL-BAND WIRELESS N ROUTERS ONLY

 

For those of you who do not understand Dual-Band N, it's essentially having 2 separate networks on one Router. Wireless A is 5ghz, Wireless B & G are 2.4ghz - Wireless N (single band) is an overlapping of those 2 frequency bands. Dual-Band, however, allows the user to access both frequencies individually and set them up as individual Networks - the advantage is that if you live in a home where the wife & kiddies, or your girlfriend, (or your wife's girlfriend) is downloading MP3's and other useless data while you're doing important tasks like playing Killzone, you can use one network band for gaming data and send all of their data over the other. Use the Quality of Service (QoS) feature of the Router, and you can then prioritize your gaming data by giving it priority access to your Router. The data on both networks doesn't interfere with each other, though overall speed is still going to be affected by your broadband service. Is Dual-Band N worth it? Absolutely, but only if you use a DBN Gaming Adapter with your PS3 to get the N speeds out of it. The PS3's native wireless adapter is a Wireless G, so no matter how fast your network is your top speed isn't going to be more than 54mbps. N speeds average above 200mbps+, depending on the adapter and router involved and proper setup. I won't say anymore than that - you'll have to figure out the rest on your own as there are some things all gamers have that they don't want to share. Just remember that overall network speed is determined by the slowest network device, so if you have an N router with a PS3, it's still only going to connect at G speeds unless you use an adapter. Those who used a Wireless G adapter with the PS2 know what I'm referring to.

 

If you're not using a gaming adapter with your PS3, then you should have your N Router's mode set to Mixed, and the other settings set accordingly. Another option is to run 2 separate Routers, a G and an N, since as I mentioned legacy network devices can cause slowdowns on N Routers, even Dual-Band N Routers.



5ghz Wireless Network Settings


1. Network Mode: Wireless N Only

2. Network Name (SSID) - Set to a unique name that you can recognize. Enable in checkbox at the bottom to broadcast.

3. Radio Band - 40mhz Wide Channel

4. Wide Channel - Auto (DFS)

5. Standard Channel - Should be grayed out.

6. SSID Broadcast - Enabled

Save the settings when complete.

 

WIRELESS MODE SETUP EXAMPLE

 

Note that the SSID's used are for examples only - I of course use different SSID's. Whatever you use, make sure that it's unique enough for you to know that it's yours. While you can of course broadcast without broadcasting your SSID (Radio only, no ID) it can be a pain if your signal drops for any reason (even a power grid cycle in your area), you might have to reconnect manually.

 

Wireless Mode, N, WRT600N

 

 

 

 

Click on Advanced Wireless Settings on the right side.

I have my particular Router's AP Isolation Enabled (default is disabled) since I have a lot of network devices and electronics. If you click on the Help link, it will explain what it is. You determine if you wish to enable yours or not.


Other settings: Check their actual settings against the defaults listed next to them, especially the N Transmission Rate and Transmission Power. If you have Dual-Band, it's the same for both the 2.4ghz and 5ghz networks. If they're all at default, then click on Wireless Security (no need to save unless you make a change).



Wireless Security- This is a personal choice, though I personally don't use any Encrypted Security because with N routers it causes multiple server drops during online gaming. It also affects your overall speed. Instead, I use MAC Address Filtering. If you want to use a Security setting, then use WPA2-Personal. Select AES for the encryption method, enter a passphrase (password), then save the settings. Set both to the same if you have a 5ghz network as well, unless you want to have 2 separate passwords. Remember that when you're done, you'll need to enter the passphrase into your Network Connection Profile on your notebook and any other system connecting to your Router. Save the changes.  I should also note that I use a Network Administration and Monitoring Program called Network Magic Pro, since I have several systems besides my PS3 on my network.  MAC Addresses can be obtained fairly easily, but NMP puts a lock on the Network so anyone that manages to get a MAC address will get a password prompt instead. It's a layer of extra protection for my network - while MAC filtering is good, it  isn't foolproof.

 


When complete, click on Wireless MAC Filter.


Wireless MAC Filter
- While you probably don't use this, I do instead of WPA2. What MAC filtering does is allow you to put every device on your network that you wish to have access to the Router on a list, using its MAC Address as the device ID. Once set, only devices on the filter will be able to have access to your network - any other systems or devices can't connect. All you need to do is to Enable the filter, and then add the MAC addresses for each device, including your systems, adapters, any wireless peripherals, etc. If you need help finding the MAC's for your Network/System, go to your Control Panel, click on Performance and Tools, then Advanced Tools on the left column, then scroll down and click on View Advanced System Details in System Information.
In the System Info window, open out the System Summary tree, the click on the Components tree. Click again on Network, then Adapter. You'll have to scroll down, but you'll see all the MAC addresses - add them all. Make sure that under Access Restriction (top of filter list) that you enable "Permit PCs listed below access to the wireless network"

Save settings. Click on the Setup tab.

The following should be set:

1. Internet Connection Type - Automatic Configuration - DHCP

2. Optional Settings - Domain should already have your ISP domain information entered. MTU - Auto.

3. Router Address - s/b 192.168.1.1, which is the default for all Linksys Routers (and many other brands as well) but you can change it if you wish. Just remember what you change it to or you'll have to reset your Router to factory defaults.

4. DHCP Server - Enabled. Users - mine's set to 75, and my starting IP is 192.168.1.25. This is helpful if you run a PS3 and other devices and you want to separate their IP's into specific addresses that you want. For example, my PS3'd Dual-Band Adapter address is 192.168.1.75. If you have game console and want specific setups, let me know and I can give you those too.

5. Time Zone - wherever you live.


Save Settings. Click on Advanced Routing, ensure that NAT (Network Address Translation) is Enabled. Save Settings if needed.


Click on
Applications and Gaming.

 

There are different ways to get your Router to open the ports required for the PS Network, PS3-PS3 Communications, and specific online gaming - Quality of Service (QoS), Single Port Forwarding, Port Range Forwarding, and Port Triggering. Personally I use Port Range or Port Triggering (Triggering is better) and QoS. Port Triggering is preferable to Port Forwarding, since Triggering relies on the game or application in question to trigger the Port request when necessary to the Router. Static Port Forwarding setups keep your Ports open as long as they are enabled in the Router setting, and as such are more vulnerable. Trigger Ports are only open as long as they game or application needs them to be open.

 

Note again that the above settings are for my own router and are provided as a guide only. Like any network setup, you may need to adjust your own settings to get optimum performance. This is just to give you

an idea of how it's supposed to look.

 

One added little trick I'd like to pass on - if you've set up your Router for Remote Access Changes, you can effectively do a POR without actually unplugging it. Save your current configuration from the Adminstration section to a convenient disk location on your remote system. Then to reset it, click the Restore Configuration button and choose the config.bin file you previously saved. It will then reset your router's settings. Since my notebook is where my PS3 is, but my Router is downstairs, I'll use this trick to reset it if I'm too lazy to go downstairs and do it. Lame - absolutely. But it works...


WIRELESS NETWORK SPEED PROBLEMS

 

Note that in any Network setup where mixed network devices are used (say a PS3's Wireless G adapter on an N network) you will see speed slowdowns on the network. However, if you're using an N network and seeing G speeds of 54mbps, don't automatically assume that the Router is connecting at G speeds - it isn't. It just appears that way due to that particular speed number, but the fact is that something has slowed the transmission down to that rate - there are more things that affect speed than I can cover in this post, but interference (RFI, EMI), Internet traffic congestion during peak times, even a single setting mismatch between your Router and Network Adapter can spell the difference between hi-speed N and being a candidate for being on a commercial with Bill & Caroline Slowsky.

 

If your speed or signal suddenly drops for no apparent reason, first try doing a Power Reset (unplugging for 45 seconds, then plugging back in) on your Router. That will usually clear most hangs, even if it suddenly stops accessing the 'net. One thing to always remember is that hardware rarely fails - problems are usually either software or user related, so in any troubleshooting always perform the simple tasks first to get back on track.

 

WIRELESS NETWORK SIGNAL PROBLEMS

If you're constantly having wireless signal issues (your computer or PS3 keeps dropping out even though you've done everything else) you probably have too many devices on your broadband network. For example, if you have more than one or two cable boxes on your network, it lowers the signal. Each device you add is like a resistor on an electronic circuit - add a device, and you get more voltage dropped over the system. Voltage drop = Signal Drop, so if you've got too many devices connected it can lower your signal to a very weak level, and during peak usage times it can drop out, causing you to endlessly bang your head against a wall, since it usually happens right before winning a long match you've been fighting hard to win. Your network drops off, and you lose all those great stats, then go to the nearest wall and begin beating your head against it.

 

Not to worry friends - your answer is a handly little device called a Broadband Line Amplifier. Always get one that is AC powered to get true signal boost - the ones that just try and boost signal on the line aren't really worth anything. Line amps run about 30-40 bucks and can usually be found at Radio Shack or online electronics outlets. Remember, AC powered is good, non-AC is bad. So you understand, this device goes on your Cable input directly as it enters your home. If you're in an apartment, run a cable to it then a splitter from there.

 

If you're using a Gaming Adapter with your PS3, it's important that its settings match your Router's for optimum performance also. One wrong setting can be the difference between Wireless G speed and Wireless N speed, or more importantly, the difference between winning or being a bullet sponge and getting fragged.

 

Interference from nearby devices and distance between Router and PS3 will also affect overall performance. A weak signal can drop your speed significantly - anything that generates RFI or EMI should be moved away from your Router or PS3. For example, electrical power strips, transformer/AC Adapters should be as far as possible from your Router and PS3 as they generate EMI that can lower your signal. Things like cordless phone bases, microwaves, anything that generates a radio signal on the base frequency of your Wireless should be as far away as possible from your Router and PS3 to reduce interference issues.

 

If you've not yet made the switch to Wireless N, which will greatly improve your Wireless range and signal, you should consider it if you have an overall weak signal. Even a line amp can't fully compensate for walls with material that block RF signals, nor will it boost your Wireless G signal enough if it's too far from your PS3.

 

HDTV GAMING CIRCUITS

 

Many HDTV's today are coming out with installed gaming circuits that automatically remove the video lag between a gaming console and the HDTV itself. Anyone who's every played Guitar Hero and used the Video Lag Calibration feature knows just how bad the video lag between a console and TV can be - up to 100ms in some cases. That might not seem like much until you actually see it and realize how important it is. I myself have a 32" Sharp Aquos, which has a gaming circuit in it. When I started using it last year for COD4, my stats went up immediately. I was previously using a 17" old RCA monitor ('87 vintage). Why an Aquos? Simple - Kojima-san uses them at Kojima Productions for his development team. If the big man of MGS fame uses them, that's good enough for me.

 

 


"Age, Wisdom, & Treachery overcomes Youth, Skill, & Daring"

Former Sony G.A.P. Member
Linksys Dual-Band N Network
MOH, RDR, KILLZONE 2/3, COD 4/5,MW2, B'Ops, Battlefield 1943, BFBC2, BATTLEFIELD 3, BLACK OPS 2:

TSD_-RAVEN-

Clans: MoBn, NBK
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Treasure Hunter
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Re: FOR THOSE WHO NEED ROUTER PORT DATA FOR KILLZONE, PS3 AND PSN.....

Apr 13, 2009
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Umbrella Scientist
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Re: FOR THOSE WHO NEED ROUTER PORT DATA FOR KILLZONE, PS3 AND PSN.....

Apr 13, 2009
Kudoed, though port forwarding seems tough at first, it should help big time for those experiencing the issues.
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Wastelander
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Re: FOR THOSE WHO NEED ROUTER PORT DATA FOR KILLZONE, PS3 AND PSN.....

Apr 24, 2009
wow this is great. I hope all of these are correct. Kudos!
Maybe i can finally get remote play to work haha

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Ghost of Sparta
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Re: FOR THOSE WHO NEED ROUTER PORT DATA FOR KILLZONE, PS3 AND PSN.....

Apr 24, 2009
This is great. Well done man and Kudos. Now if you guys who complain about lag and d/c's at least try this then come to the forums and complain. 
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Hekseville Citizen
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Re: FOR THOSE WHO NEED ROUTER PORT DATA FOR KILLZONE, PS3 AND PSN.....

Apr 24, 2009

unfortunately some dont even know how to access the router settings page from their computer, i find it easier just to tell everyone to connect direct to modem and avoid wireless.

 

 

it just opens up a can of worms when u bring up this "port forwarding" lingo to some.

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Lombax Warrior
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Re: FOR THOSE WHO NEED ROUTER PORT DATA FOR KILLZONE, PS3 AND PSN.....

Apr 25, 2009

Unfortunately, I can't help those who do not wish to take the basic responsibility to learn how to access their router and make the basic port settings necessary to get optimum speeds and to make it work properly. This isn't Rocket Science, and I used to be one. It is not that difficult to learn how to setup your Router. . Computers and Network devices are not toasters or refrigerators - you cannot just plug them in, and expect them to work perfectly without any knowledge or maintenance required, though fully 80% of people treat them like that. Wired Ethernet is not as fast as wireless, though some might think so. Radio works at the speed of light - wired connections are limited by the conductor and connections they''re hooked to.

 

All Router manufacturers have basic tutorials on how to access and setup your Router. There is also a very good site that has good definitions and explanations on the different networking terms. The site is Broadband DSLReports. For Linksys owners, they have an excellent tutorial system on the Support section of their site. Also, 2 new programs, Speed Meter Pro and Network Magic are great for finding any "leaks" in your network signal. Other problem sources are interference objects such as transformers - cordless phone bases, microwaves, baby monitors, anything near your router that generates EMI or RFI.

 

If you can't deal with learning that, I suggest you take up something less mental - Ping Pong, maybe.

 

ILikeMonkeys, always good to see you online playing KZ-2. You're both a great team player and opponent, especially in light of all of the idiots that seemed to have joined the crowd lately. Yes, these settings are right from the good folks at Sony - you can also find it at the PS3 information links there. The QOS information is from me as it helps your data move faster. Like when I frag your a$$ during a KZ2 match....

Another good article I came across recently might help those of you who don't understand how throughput speeds are attained and what affects them. For example, many don't know that a badly fragmented drive will affect you speed as well. Most defrag utilities aren't good enough because they don't defrag the paging/index file, since it can only be done before Windows starts. The program we use in the IT industry is called Diskeeper - the current version is great as it runs as a background process.

The article on throughput is here: UNDERSTANDING THROUGHPUT

There are some Network drops that are strictly KZ Server related - Error 3 is a good one, and there are some for long term inactivity. If you have setup your router properly with the PSN port data, you shouldn't have any port errors for some time. I usually play for many, many hours without an interruption.

If anyone has a Linksys Wireless N or Dual-Band Wireless N Router and wishes the settings from my personal Linksys 600N Dual-Band, I've added the setups from my Router below.. There is also one other bit of information that will increase your PS3's wireless speed significantly, but I won't post it publicly here. Some things are best kept private, though I'm sure there are those that already know what to do. That's for Dual-Band owners only, so if you're interested, PM me with you Linksys DBN Router model #.

 

Prior to the procedures below, go to Linksys Support, look up your Router, then download the latest firmware update. If it's the same as what you have, then download that. Linksys Support Standard Procedure for any Linksys Router problem with speed or signal begins with flashing the firmware prior to adjusting any other settings. I've added settings for your Router to match your adapter since I have the same hardware.



You can look for your Router's firmware update here:
Linksys Support

Enter your Model # and go from there to get the firmware update.


The following assumes you have a Linksys Single Band or Dual-Band Wireless N Router; though these settings are from my Linksys WRT600N Dual-Band, the Admin Panel is the same, except for the extra 5ghz Band setup on mine.

Just in case, I've also added the 5ghz settings. Note that these settings are for use with an external DBN Adapter connected to the PS3, which is setup to match the Router settings.

 

On your Router:

Access the Router Admin Panel & Wireless Settings from your Browser - http://192.168.1.1/BasicWirelessSettings.htm

1. Click on the Administration link in the Admin Panel - it's on the right hand side.

2. At the very bottom, click on Backup Configurations -save the file to a convenient location on your drive. If you don't save your configuration, you'll have to setup your Router all over again if you've already made any custom changes.

The flashing process restores the Router to its default configuration.

3. After backing up the configuration, click on Firmware Upgrade (top right under Administration)

4. Where it says Select a File to upgrade, browse to the update you downloaded, then start the flashing process (flash means install).

5. After the process is completed, and still under the Administration tab, click on the Management link on the left side.

6. At the bottom, click on Restore Configurations. Go to the file you backed up earlier.

7. Check the following are enabled (check box checked) - UPnP (Plug 'n Play).

8. If you wish to have the ability to change your Router settings from your notebook via wireless connection, enable the following under Management also:

Web Access - Enable both HTTP and Web Utility Access via Wireless.

Remote Access - Remote Management - Enabled, Web Utility Access - HTTP, Remote Upgrade - Disabled (enable if you want remote firmware upgrade

ability), Allow Remote IP Address - Any IP Address, Remote Management Port -8080.

UPnP - UPnP - MUST BE Enabled for PS3's,

 

Allow Users to Configure - Enable, Allow Users to Disable Internet Access - Disabled.


Click on "Save Settings" at the bottom of the window, and wait for the Router to complete the save. If you don't and you go to another panel, the settings will have to be done again.

After that, click on the Wireless tab, and Basic Wireless Settings.



2.4ghz Wireless Network Settings

1. Network Mode: Wireless N (Note: if you have wireless G devices on your network, then set your Network Mode to Mixed. ONLY use N if ALL YOUR NETWORK DEVICES are wireless N.)

 

2. Network Name (SSID) - Set to a unique name that you can recognize. Enable in checkbox at the bottom to broadcast.

3. Radio Band - 20mhz Standard Channel

4. Wide Channel - Auto (DFS)

5. Standard Channel - Should be grayed out.

6. SSID Broadcast - Enabled

Having a unique SSID broadcasted ensure that you or your family won't accidentally connect to a neighbor's network that may have a Linksys Router,

but didn't change the default SSID from "Linksys". With today's N routers and their ranges, it's easy to pick up another neighbor's network.


FOR DUAL-BAND WIRELESS N ROUTERS ONLY


5ghz Wireless Network Settings

1. Network Mode: Wireless N Only

2. Network Name (SSID) - Set to a unique name that you can recognize. Enable in checkbox at the bottom to broadcast.

3. Radio Band - 40mhz Wide Channel

4. Wide Channel - Auto (DFS)

5. Standard Channel - Should be grayed out.

6. SSID Broadcast - Enabled

Save the settings when complete.



Click on Advanced Wireless Settings on the right side.

I have my particular Router's AP Isolation Enabled (default is disabled) since I have a lot of network devices and electronics. If you click on the Help link, it will explain what it is. You determine if you wish to enable yours or not.


Other settings: Check their actual settings against the defaults listed next to them, especially the N Transmission Rate and Transmission Power. If you have Dual-Band, it's the same for both the 2.4ghz and 5ghz networks. If they're all at default, then click on Wireless Security (no need to save unless you make a change).



Wireless Security- This is a personal choice, though I personally don't use any Encrypted Security because with N routers it causes multiple server drops during online gaming. It also affects your overall speed. Instead, I use MAC Address Filtering. If you want to use a Security setting, then use WPA2-Personal. Select AES for the encryption method, enter a passphrase (password), then save the settings. Set both to the same if you have a 5ghz network as well, unless you want to have 2 separate passwords. Remember that when you're done, you'll need to enter the passphrase into your Network Connection Profile on your notebook and any other system connecting to your Router. Save the changes. Realistically though, unless you're an Accountant or do a LOT of online purchasing....
When complete, click on Wireless MAC Filter.


Wireless MAC Filter
- While you probably don't use this, I do instead of WPA2. What MAC filtering does is allow you to put every device on your network that you wish to have access to the Router on a list, using its MAC Address as the device ID. Once set, only devices on the filter will be able to have access to your network - any other systems or devices can't connect. All you need to do is to Enable the filter, and then add the MAC addresses for each device, including your systems, adapters, any wireless peripherals, etc. If you need help finding the MAC's for your Network/System, go to your Control Panel, click on Performance and Tools, then Advanced Tools on the left column, then scroll down and click on View Advanced System Details in System Information.
In the System Info window, open out the System Summary tree, the click on the Components tree. Click again on Network, then Adapter. You'll have to scroll down, but you'll see all the MAC addresses - add them all. Make sure that under Access Restriction (top of filter list) that you enable "Permit PCs listed below access to the wireless network"

Save settings. Click on the Setup tab.

The following should be set:

1. Internet Connection Type - Automatic Configuration - DHCP

2. Optional Settings - Domain should already have your ISP domain information entered. MTU - Auto.

3. Router Address - s/b 192.168.1.1, which is the default for all Linksys Routers (and many other brands as well) but you can change it if you wish. Just remember what you change it to or you'll have to reset your Router to factory defaults.

4. DHCP Server - Enabled. Users - mine's set to 75, and my starting IP is 192.168.1.100. This is helpful if you run a PS3 or other devices and you want to separate their IP's into specific addresses that you want. For example, my PS3'd Dual-Band Adapter address is 192.168.1.75. If you have game console and want specific setups, let me know and I can give you those too.

5. Time Zone - wherever you live.


Save Settings. Click on Advanced Routing, ensure that NAT (Network Address Translation) is Enabled. Save Settings if needed.


Click on Applications and Gaming.

There are different ways to get your Router to open the ports required for the PS Network, PS3-PS3 Communications, and specific

online gaming - Quality of Service (QoS), Single Port Forwarding, Port Range Forwarding, and Port Triggering. Personally I use Port Range or Port Triggering (usually Triggering is better) and QoS.

 

Port Range Forwarding setting example:

 

Application Name Start ~ End Port Protocol To IP Address

COD4 - PS3 3658 - 3658 UDP 192 . 168 . 1 . 75 (THIS IS THE IP OF MY PS3'S ADAPTER - THE ADDRESS SHOULD BE YOUR PS3 OR YOUR PS3'S ADAPTER)

 

Port Triggering setting example:

 

Application Name Triggered Range Forwarded Range Enabled


PS3-3658 3658 - 3658 3658 - 3658 CHECKED



 

Quality of Service setup is pretty easy - you just need the MAC address of the device you wish to have priority access to the Router, which in this case is your PS3 or its adapter.

Note again that the above settings are for my own router and are provided as a guide only. Like any network setup, you may need to adjust your own settings to get optimum performance. This is just to give you

an idea of how it's supposed to look.

 

 

 

 

 


"Age, Wisdom, & Treachery overcomes Youth, Skill, & Daring"

Former Sony G.A.P. Member
Linksys Dual-Band N Network
MOH, RDR, KILLZONE 2/3, COD 4/5,MW2, B'Ops, Battlefield 1943, BFBC2, BATTLEFIELD 3, BLACK OPS 2:

TSD_-RAVEN-

Clans: MoBn, NBK
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Last Guardian
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Re: KILLZONE 2, PS3 AND PSN ROUTER PORT FORWARDING/PORT TRIGGERING/QoS DATA

Apr 28, 2009
This is great, cheers. 
Seb Downie - Producer - Guerrilla Games
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Lombax Warrior
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Re: KILLZONE 2, PS3 AND PSN ROUTER PORT FORWARDING/PORT TRIGGERING/QoS DATA

Apr 30, 2009
How do i enable upnp on my linksys router BEFSR41?  I dont see it in the router menus/tabs.  Trying to fix communication error disconnections,,,9052. Thanks.  
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Last Guardian
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Re: KILLZONE 2, PS3 AND PSN ROUTER PORT FORWARDING/PORT TRIGGERING/QoS DATA

Apr 30, 2009
Holy cow.... that may be the most detailed and throughout OP I have ever seen before. You must really care about this.
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