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Gaming Beast
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Jul 13, 2012

Well I'm glad you enjoyed it. I knew a guy who bought one (new) only to have the entire body rust thru within ~5 years. And from what I recall, it was a comon complaint.

 

Each to his own. The ambassador we had was a fine car and never quit working unexpectedly on me, whether in the dead of a subzero North East Ohio winter like 77/78 or in the peak heat and humidity (90F+/90%) of the summer from mid June through mid July. And as I said, it was fast.

- There's a distinct difference between slow & deliberate and deliberately slow -
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Wastelander
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Jul 14, 2012

After college, I worked as a car salesman for awhile and made it my mission to try to sell all the "unloved" cars in the used car lot - cars like a Chevy Vega (which a mechanic described as not having a radiator big enough to cool a popcorn fart) and an ugly green Pinto that I tried to market to local stoes as a delivery car.  One car that I though I would have no trouble selling was an AMC car - one of the basic box-shaped models.  One day, a kid who needed a car for college came to the lot and I had him convinced that the AMC would make a good school car.  We test drove the car back to the house and I was making the same pitch to his Dad - about how this was a good safe sensible car for his son.  I was in the middle of my pitch when he pointed to the car and said "what's that?".  Apparently, when we turned into his driveway, something in the differential had separated, allowing the outside axle to migrate outwards.  So what he was pointing out was the rear wheel and tire which were now entirely outside of the wheel well.  I suppose that if I had been a true salesman, I would have said something like "once we gat that minor problem fixed - it will be safer than ever!"  But I was just grateful that it happened before the sale.

Was that a problem with those cars?

I spent a lot of time in AMC cars because the father of my best friend in grade school was an "AMC man", bought only AMC products and had good luck with them - driving them until their wheels fell off - although not literally.

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First Son
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Sep 30, 2012
Gt5 is made buy pd a japan company so their focus is more on their cars,vs forza 4 is made by turn 10 a american company so they focused on all the great american muscle cars..I like both games but when i want to have fun and drag I go to forza because they have the better muscle cars
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Uncharted Territory
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

[ Edited ]
Sep 30, 2012

bink1fly wrote:
Gt5 is made buy pd a japan company so their focus is more on their cars,vs forza 4 is made by turn 10 a american company so they focused on all the great american muscle cars..I like both games but when i want to have fun and drag I go to forza because they have the better muscle cars

 

 Am I having Déjà vu all over again...?

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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Sep 30, 2012

anjen wrote:

Well I'm glad you enjoyed it. I knew a guy who bought one (new) only to have the entire body rust thru within ~5 years. And from what I recall, it was a comon complaint.

 

Each to his own. The ambassador we had was a fine car and never quit working unexpectedly on me, whether in the dead of a subzero North East Ohio winter like 77/78 or in the peak heat and humidity (90F+/90%) of the summer from mid June through mid July. And as I said, it was fast.


What cars didn't end up as a pile of rust back then? My brother's 69 Mustand quite literally had quarter panels that were, I kid you not, Bondo with cardboard underneath it. Living in the North East and because of the road salts used, conditions were more harsh toward a lot of cars than in other parts of the country. 

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Gaming Beast
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Sep 30, 2012

Dan hit the nail on the head with AMC but here is one even fewer know of.

 Crosley. They had a good run of wins with there little cars.

th.jpg

                         ^

I happen to know someone who has one of these little gems.

 

thCAMVEYC9.jpg

 

 

Jess


"Speed only counts if you can make the next turn." Jessica King #22
GT5 Pics:
http://s196.photobucket.com/albums/aa195/SnakeEyesRacing/GT5/
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Uncharted Territory
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Oct 1, 2012

CaptainAlbator wrote:

anjen wrote:

Well I'm glad you enjoyed it. I knew a guy who bought one (new) only to have the entire body rust thru within ~5 years. And from what I recall, it was a comon complaint.

 

Each to his own. The ambassador we had was a fine car and never quit working unexpectedly on me, whether in the dead of a subzero North East Ohio winter like 77/78 or in the peak heat and humidity (90F+/90%) of the summer from mid June through mid July. And as I said, it was fast.


What cars didn't end up as a pile of rust back then? My brother's 69 Mustand quite literally had quarter panels that were, I kid you not, Bondo with cardboard underneath it. Living in the North East and because of the road salts used, conditions were more harsh toward a lot of cars than in other parts of the country. 


That was what is "officially" known as an "industrial paint job", a "wholesale job" or a car that's been that's classified as "close enough for government work..."

 

It be the truth though... The NE tears cars up. Chevy had a problem with early Vegas, they actually showed up on the showroom floors with rust already installed as an unwanted option package... (...actual factual item that, scary isn't it..?...)

 

The mid 70's Cadillacs were the first to use recycled steel in an effort to cut the costs on the car. At the time, the process left impurities in the metal that literally caused the body to rust off the car in a matter of years.


When combined with the rust issues on their trucks, it led to GM developing it's "galvanized steel" process, coating the bodies before prime and paint. The result was the 88 Chevy pickups, with their newfangled design having bodies that held up quite well. While working in the auto world, I saw many with 250.000 plus on the odometer and bodies that still had potential for being redone.

 

Now a days it's an industry standard process, but like all things, it took some time for American car companies to realize they needed to step up. Japanese cars rusted the same way, but the cost was killing US cars to compete even with the shipping them here. But what really spurred the move was the Audis, BMWs and Mercedes... Cars that came from similar climates that didn't have the same rust issues over time. Cadillac, Olds, Lincoln and top end Chrysler marques were getting their lunches handed to them by these guys. When Japanese cars started showing the same characteristics...

 

In a country where the highest selling vehicle for the better part of a quarter century was(is) the F150 pickup, it's sort of easy to see why the car design and worrying about such things took a bit to catch up, and why the Chevy truck was the real first "full scale field test" for the process.

 

LOL.

 

I can still remember welding JC Whitney "fingers" into wheel wells. You could tell the good body shops from the bad when it came to wholesale cars. They'd use fiberglass filler for the main coats, and then skim coat with bondo, as it wasn't water proof. It's harder to do it that way, costs a little more and it's a pain to sand... But water would get under the repair and pop the bondo out whole or ,make it bubble and crack if you didn't have the glass fibered base under it. When done right, fiberglass or tiger hair crammed down in the crevices made for a pretty solid foundation. Though by the time you were done the quarter panel could weigh 20 pounds or more than it did from the factory...

 

LOL.

 

Thanks for the memories Captain...

 

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Uncharted Territory
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

[ Edited ]
Oct 1, 2012

SnakeEyes427 wrote:

Dan hit the nail on the head with AMC but here is one even fewer know of.

 Crosley. They had a good run of wins with there little cars.

th.jpg

                         ^

I happen to know someone who has one of these little gems.

 

thCAMVEYC9.jpg

 

 


AMC was the Conrail of the Auto World. It was the combination of many smaller companies all floundering in the the same time frame. IIRC Crosby, Rambler, maybe Nash and Hudson all joined in under that banner. One was bought by Chrysler, but the name eludes me. The kicker was in getting Willys, aka Jeep in deal. 

 

The only difference was that it wasn't owned by the government...

 

The quadratrac 4WD system, later used to pioneer the Eagle sedan was 20 years ahead of it's time. Heck, you could have mounted a 110mm howitzer to the top of one and gone into battle with it and had as good chance as any personnel carrier of the day and have more handling and firepower... LOL... With AC and a stereo.

 

I'd love to get my hands on a 66 Marlin or 69 Rebel 2dr sedan. Very good looking cars.

 

The first gen Plymouth Barracuda and Dodge Charger in 65/66 took a page from the same book as the Marlin, except the Marlin was bigger and prettier. The others were just stretched Darts/Valiants/Coronets with a 273 V8 instead of the venerable slant 6. Chrysler always did have a penchant for sharing platforms and stretching or shrinking as needed. (..Dodge Dy-nasty stretched K Car anyone...?..)

 

Loved the slant 6 though. Couldn't kill it with a grenade. I remember one of those infomercials where they put some sort of duralube or whatever in the one on a portable dyno. Then they dropped the pan and took the valve cover off it and started it up. Just for giggles, they then took a garden hose and poured water all over it and soaked it. Still kept running.

 

What was funny to me was the the distributor was seriously over prepped for the H20, and the coil and the ballast resistor were completely out of sight to keep them from getting wet.

 

Anyone who knew anything about Mopars always kept a can of WD 40 and a couple spare ballast resistors in the glove box... They were good for one good mud puddle or pothole and that was about it. After it stalled, it was a pull to the side, pop the hood, spray the distributor down again, replace the resistor and you were off. LOL...

 

Still, with some light machine work and a set of 3x2 bbl carbs, that motor was a force to be reckoned with. It had some serious potential hidden within those slanted cylinder walls.

 

Nice to see you back Jess. You have a knack for nostalgia that always makes you go "huh..?" or "oh yeah" like the Kool-Aid man. 

 

I usualy react like the Kool Aid man. My son is getting sick of fixing the walls in the house though... Smiley Very Happy

 

___

 

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Gaming Beast
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Re: WHY NOT AMC?

Oct 2, 2012

Thanks Dan, it is good to be back. Smiley Happy

Jess


"Speed only counts if you can make the next turn." Jessica King #22
GT5 Pics:
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