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Feb 27 2012
By: dmcallis Fender Bender 3679 posts
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GT5 Tuning How-to

19 replies 769 views Edited Feb 27, 2012

As some of you may have noticed have started a Tome with the same title as this discussion.  And I frankly suck at my knowledge of tuning...

That is why I started this discussion.  The Tome is setup as a collaboration so everyone who wants to can contribute.

I plan this as a "Teach a man to" as opposed to a "Give a man a" project. 

There should be plenty of examples, but it should not be a database of tunes.  This should teach How To Tune. 

Big difference.

I have the bare beginnings in place and the framework planned, but obviously I need help...  Now I could muddle my way through, but it sure would go a lot faster if someone who knows what they are doing adds stuff too, in contrast to my "learn as you go" approach.  I really think this project would benefit us all.

So, I make this request with the due respect for those on the forum:

HELP!  I really need it.  Thanks all.

At the very least go check it out and comment.

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Fender Bender
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Feb 27, 2012

The fact I have trouble with driving a consistent line is hurting me.  In trying to test how to set up a car for a lower-grip surface, I can't get the numbers to prove my theory.  Or my theory might be wrong.   Wouldn't be the first time... 

So, I'm asking here.  Is my theory sound that the more grip you have, the lower and stiffer your ride can be, and is the reverse true?  If you know there will be less grip for the same tires (rain, for example, but on street tires) should you soften your suspension?

Anyone help me out?

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Feb 27, 2012

dmcallis wrote:

So, I'm asking here.  Is my theory sound that the more grip you have, the lower and stiffer your ride can be, and is the reverse true?  If you know there will be less grip for the same tires (rain, for example, but on street tires) should you soften your suspension?

That's pretty reasonable. 

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First Son
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Feb 27, 2012

I'll throw in my knowledge here.  I may have to spread it over several posts, but if there's one thing I'm confident I can do well on Gran Turismo, it's tuning.

So...

Downforce: downforce affects your car more as your speed increases.  More downforce on the front means that there will be more traction to the front (note: turning) wheels, which can make the car steer quicker.  More downforce on the rear will stabilize the car while turning, which contributes to understeer, just the same way as unbalanced downforce to the front can cause oversteer.

Ballast: even just checking the ballast in GT5 can give you insight to the car's handling.  Even with no ballast applied at all, you will still see the weight distribution of the car.  Applying ballast to the car can greatly affect the car's handling, and can even make the car handle better in the turns despite the added weight.  In general, a well-handling car will have close to, if not a 50-50 weight balance between the front and the rear.  Should you need to add ballast, get as close to a 50-50 balance as you can without excessively weighing your car down.

Engine: I have no idea if this happens anymore, but I have read on these forums about performance points (PP) going up as the engine limiter is applied more.  My belief is that this happens because PP factors in weight, weight distribution, torque, and horsepower, and if it detects that the increased power will be detrimental to the car's handling, it will knock down the PP.

(Intake, exhaust, blah-blah-blah...)

Turbos!  Turbos obviously give your car a helluva lot of extra juice.  Be careful that you're using the proper turbo, though!  While the stage 3 turbo kit often gives you the most horsepower of the three, the mid-range RPM turbo will most often give you the most torque.  Check the performance points of your car as you apply the turbos, as some cars (Subarus mostly) will actually benefit more from the stage 2 turbo kit, rather than the stage 3.  Also watch the horsepower and torque curves in your tuning menu.

Transmission: this is always a matter of what course you're on.  When tuning the transmission, one needs to always consider the weight, horsepower, and torque of the car, and of equal importance is knowing the course you're on; if it's short, close up the gearbox (set for a lower top speed to give more acceleration).  If you have a long course demanding top speed but not as much acceleration and pull out of corners, open the gears up.  I tune all my cars on the Nürburgring, as this course is the longest, most technical, and most demanding of all.  There are great high-speed stretches (particularly the main straightaway) that will let you know if your top speed is too low, and the number of low- and medium-speed corners demands proper tuning of the rest of your gearbox.  What I do is set the "top speed" auto-tuner to accelerate faster than I usually want, and then I simply open up the 6th gear.  Get this right, and you'll have great acceleration in and out of corners when you need it, and you will also benefit from the top speed from having that 6th gear set open enough.  When I say "open up" the gear box, I mean spread the gears farther out; this will give you higher top speed.  When I say "close up" the gears, I mean set them for more acceleration.

Whew!  That was a lot of typing.  I'll come back with more soon, but now it's time to go race.  Peace!

Brayn-GT5-banner
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Fender Bender
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Feb 28, 2012

Well, applying my theory to the car I was using for the new Time Trial at Kart Space, I raised and softened the setup and took almost two seconds off my time...  Went from like 48,500 to like 18,005, dropped 30,000 positions...

I'd call that proven...  LOL

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Fender Bender
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Feb 28, 2012

To me, tuning is what sets GT apart from the other racing games. I can remember when I started how elated I was once I realized I can change my settings. That being said I keep settings very basic. I didnt read Diabetics post (im hungry) but I limit my tuning to lowering the suspension, adjusting the brakes and rear end/top speed. I'd suggest the KISS method while learning.

Also ALL my cars I use get a racing tranny, rear end, clutch and racing suspension. Tuning takes a long time so I'd rather spend it racing. I know I'd get better lap times with more in depth tunes, as well as a wheel. I'll read Diabetics post after I eat as Im sure I could learn from it as well.

Dirty_Harry44
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Fender Bender
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Mar 5, 2012

Added a writeup of oil changes and new car break-in.

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Fender Bender
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Mar 5, 2012

Just realized I never thanked you for that.  Sorry it took so long...

I wll be encorporating at least part of that, so thanks.

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Mar 5, 2012

dmcallis wrote:

Added a writeup of oil changes and new car break-in.

200 miles is fully broken-in, and engines start to lose power (even with fresh oil) beyond 6000 miles.  That includes used Standard cars.  The Race Modification process undoes any break-in but does not reset the odometer so you have to go 200 miles from RM distance to re-break it in.  Electric cars (Tesla, Leaf, i-MiEV) don't break in.

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Umbrella Scientist
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Re: GT5 Tuning How-to

Mar 5, 2012

clacksman wrote:

dmcallis wrote:

Added a writeup of oil changes and new car break-in.

200 miles is fully broken-in, and engines start to lose power (even with fresh oil) beyond 6000 miles.  That includes used Standard cars.  The Race Modification process undoes any break-in but does not reset the odometer so you have to go 200 miles from RM distance to re-break it in.  Electric cars (Tesla, Leaf, i-MiEV) don't break in.

Isn't it technically 300km and 10,000km?

DriverSports.org
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