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May 05 2010
By: MaGeeK-mAn Wastelander 883 posts
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~God of War Information Thread~ (Carried over from the PS Forums)

3 replies 700 views Edited May 5, 2010

 

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~God of War Information Thread~

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General Information

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  • Published by: Sony Computer Entertainment America
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  • Developed by: Sony Computer Entertainment Studios Santa Monica
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  • Genre(s): Hack and slash, action adventure
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  • Platform: PlayStation 2
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  • Game Mode(s): Single player
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  • Max Players: 1
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  • Release Date: March 22, 2005
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  • Rating: ESRB M (Mature 17+)
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  • Retail Price: USD $19.99
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  • Media: DVD-9
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  • Official Website: http://us.playstation.com/PS2/Games/God_of_War/OGS/main.asp
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Official Boxart

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Overview

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Similar to franchises like Devil May Cry, Rygar, and Castlevania, the game draws its inspiration from ancient Greek mythology and boasts a heavy emphasis on exploration and battle strategy. Broken into three to four acts, the game also has a strong focus on story-telling and boast tons of magic spells and abilities. Described as "Clash of the Titans meets Heavy Metal", God of War equips its hero with a pair of sword-like chain weapons that can grab enemies, perform multi-hit combos, and pull off a variety of different aerial attacks. Slight platforming elements and an energy collection system similar to that of Onimusha have been incorporated as well, and players are even able to use certain elements of their fallen enemies as a weapon (re: Medusa's head, for instance, can be used to turn enemies to stone after you've defeated her).

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Features

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  • Fight for your life against creatures taken from Greek mythology
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  • Challenging puzzles and incredible platform levels - Scale walls and mountains, and head out to sea -- all while facing hundreds of deadly opponents
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  • Face off against multiple foes in unbelievable situations - from a demonic temple to the high seas
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  • Collect magic and upgrades to upgrade your swords and give you incredible powers and a near-unlimited variety of new attacks
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  • Amazing graphics bring the slaughter and carnage of Kratos' quest to vivid, terrible life
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Confirmed Bosses *spoiler*

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Pictures will not be included in description.

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The Hydra

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  • A massive sea serpent roughly the size of a small island, with innumerable heads; one head is significantly larger than the rest and sits central on the serpent's body, directing the movements of the other heads and, as stated by one sailor, reviving them as well. As the game's main narrative begins, Kratos has been assigned by Poseidon, god of the sea, to kill the beast, which has been challenging his sovereignty by destroying ships and killing sailors. Kratos kills it by impaling the dominant head on the mast of a ship; when the main head dies, the rest follow, bursting open in grisly fashion.
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Medusa

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  • Similar to the common gorgons battled throughout the game, Medusa's hair is pink, unlike the common green hair of the gorgons. Medusa is battled after Kratos has docked his ship in the harbour of Athens. Aphrodite asks him to bring her the head of Medusa, so she can grant him Medusa's Gaze, a magic that can turn enemies into stone. Whether Medusa is a "boss" is debatable, as she is fought as if a regular gorgon and has no seen health bar, but is recognized as a special enemy, and upon being defeated, offers a reward.
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Hades' Minotaur

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  • A 20 foot tall, skeletal minotaur wearing nearly impenetrable armour. It guards the tomb of the Architect's son in the segment of the Temple of Pandora dedicated to Hades. Judging by the fact that a ballista is present in the Guardian's chamber, it was apparently placed there as a final test to anyone who had made it that far through the temple in an attempt to claim Pandora's Box. Kratos kills it by first chipping away its armour and then firing the ballista at it, impaling it to a door; in its death throes, the beast's hoof smashes open a sealed door, allowing Kratos to proceed.
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Ares

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  • The Greek god of war, Ares appears as a gigantic man whose head touches the clouds. His hair and chinstrap beard are made of fire and he wears battle armour. Prior to his confrontation with Kratos, he reveals that he has two rows of spider-like "legs" made of iron protruding from his back. Kratos faces him twice, once in hand to hand combat, and then in a sword duel. He is finished off when Kratos drives his sword through Ares chest and out his back. He then explodes from the inside.
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Articles

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E3: 2004 God of War - More Details

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If someewhat lighthearted Jak and Ratchet represented the ying of SCEA's lineup, then certainly the dark, brooding, God of War would be the yang that balances it out. Sony's newly formed Santa Monica studio has blasted out of the gate with a title that they claim will be part Devil May Cry, and part ICO. Due out for release sometime during the beginning of 2005, gamers will assume the role as an ex-Spartan warrior that has been ordered to go to Athens and kill Aries, the god of war. Before he can do that, he must retrieve an item in Pandora's box, which is rumoured to be Aries' weak point.

God of War uses an intersting point of view for their story. As he breathes his last breath, our nameless warrior's life flashes before his eyes. More specifically, the last three weeks before his demise is what gamers will be experiencing when playing through the game. Will you be able to change his fate? Sony is keeping that information close to their chest, but it provides an interesting look at a genre that's rife with cheesy plots and even cheesier dialogue.

The combat system in God of War is simple enough. You have two attacks dedicated to attacks, while the other two are used for grabs and magic attacks. In your arsenal of 15 - 20 moves, you will be able to mix and match them as you please. There aren't any preset combos in this game, so if you wish to mix 3 weak attacks followed by 2 strong attacks, and ending with a magic attack, it's totally possible. You can also launch them into the air, jump up and attack them before grabbing them and slamming them into the ground. Speaking of grabs, they play an interesting part in your moveset too. You have several options while you have someone in your clutches. You can beat them senseless and then stab them in the chest, or you can literally tear them in two. The downside of the latter is that you won't be able to grab any orbs that fall out of the enemies, but you'll take them out much faster.

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Another interesting feature is the ability to take out enemies using a special 'fatality' mini-game. Once a foe has been brought to their knees, an icon will appear over their head. Press the corresponding button and you will enter in a mini-game where you must press the buttons with proper timing. If you are successful, you will be treated to a special death animation, not to mention that you will earn more orbs. In one of the fights that we were able to play through, our hero was up against a giant Cyclops.

Once we had taken it down, we were able to enter the mini-game, where our hero proceeded to slide in between its legs, climb onto its back, and then shove both of his blades through the top of the Cyclops' head. Very gruesome, but also very new and creative. After we had taken care of the Cyclops, we said hello to Medusa, who is the guardian of the temple that houses Pandora's Box. This particular boss fight emphasized the difficulty that many bosses in later stages will have. Although Medusa does have her standard melee attacks, she also has her classic stare that can turn you into stone. If you can't escape quickly, she'll essentially kill you in one hit. Defeating Medusa also provided us with the first magical attack in the game. By holding up Medusa's head (which you had taken for yourself), you could turn enemies into stone, where they would be incredibly easy to take care of. This tactic also works for larger enemies, although it obviously takes a longer time to immobilize them. What will excite many action gamers is that you will never be without your core actions, no matter what situation you are in. The demo featured two scenes where you will be hanging from either a wall or a chain. Even then, gamers still have access to their attacks and grabs, which will come in handy since enemies will also be suspended in the air with you.

Despite being a relatively new studio, Sony Santa Monica has done an exceptional job with the visual and aural aspect of the game. Not only does the game feature some very sharp and menacing character designs, but the amount of action that can occur on the screen is unbelievable. In the aforementioned chain scene, there are actually scores of undead and Greek warriors (who are on your side) fight in both the background and the foreground while you traverse the chasm before you. Your character is a walking piece of intimidation, with blood red marks covering his entire body, and two huge chained blades that can stretch out a good 15 feet in any direction. With nearly 20 base enemies (and numerous variations on them), you'll definitely need that firepower too.

It may be planned for release in early 2005, but Sony Santa Monica is expecting the game to have a good 12 - 16 hours of playtime the first time through, which should excite fans of the genre who are sick of titles that end abruptly. We'll have more impressions of a newer build tomorrow evening, so stayed tuned!

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God of War

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Kratos was once a Spartan warrior. He now serves the will of the gods who have empowered him with fantastic abilities -- abilities to help him more efficiently butcher his fellow man. When God of War begins, we see Kratos plummeting to his death. Something has driven him to suicide. Before he splatters across the rocks, the game jumps back in time and we're given the opportunity to see what leads up to our antihero's eventual demise.

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The story revolves around figuring out how and why Kratos meets his death. We know he's a vicious killer -- a **bleep** -- but we don't exactly know why. We don't know why all the NPC characters met throughout the game fear him. All we know is that he was once dangling off the fingers of the gods and now he seeks Pandora's Box, a device of unimaginable power that will bestow upon him a weapon capable of killing a god. He intends to use this power to end Aries, the god of war. But what is his dark secret? Why do the people fear him? Why does he commit suicide?

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We recently had the opportunity to play and see quite a bit of God of War. And, while Sony wasn't speaking at any length about the storyline, we did get to experience other areas of the game that are already making it one of the most anticipated titles of 2005.

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"It's like Devil May Cry evolved." Our own Ed Lewis' statement may sound a little bold and blasphemous to the average Dante fan, but it's pretty damned accurate. Basically, God of War is a combination of Sands of Time's magic, the uniquely monstrous and grisly backdrop of a twisted mythological Greece, and the fundamental style and juggling combat of Devil May Cry. It takes these three basics, combines them, and then shoots the whole thing through the roof. Because of this, God of War has us more excited than any other third-person action title on the horizon, which is an even bolder, more blasphemous statement.

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Stylistically, God of War is a game of fast, smooth animation, clean lines, and epic scale. The crisp but cluttered environments are lively and interactive. Everything we were shown demonstrated the great pains artists are taking to deliver something that's familiarly Clash of the Titans, but still horrifically new.

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Imagine pouring rain and the high seas. Imagine burning Greek sailing ships overrun with undead soldiers. Imagine them under simultaneous attack by the Hydra, whose heads are each the size of three school busses. Imagine a massive temple dedicated to Pandora -- a temple so twisted and bizarre that cylindrical courtyards open to vast caverns, bladed deathtraps, and even ceremonial burial chambers. The size and intricate detailing of the levels is utterly astonishing, but more interesting is the way they funnel gamers from one distinct gameplay type to another without do much as a stutter.

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On the boat, Kratos moved from engaging multiple foes at a single time to climbing and consistently fighting his way up the ropes of an enormous mast. From there he fell into the bowels of the ship, where he met his first Hydra head and proceeded to slam its face into the hull. After that he was tearing the wings off harpies, moving hand-over-hand across a rope taught between the fiery wreck of one vessel and the broken hull of another, and then balancing on beams high in the air only to eventually puncture the eye of the biggest Hydra head ever seen. Similarly, the Pandora level very quickly and consistently hit us with a variety of gameplay types -- exploratory platforming, puzzle, and combat, specifically.

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The platforming isn't as advanced as Prince of Persia, but it does involve the straight vertical ascent of cliff faces, lots of rope dangling and climbing, and the occasionally necessary double jump into beam balancing scenario. In terms of puzzles, God of War offers box, switch, and more elaborate varieties of brain teasers. We got to see Kratos push, pull, and kick a box toward a line of elevated archers so that he could reach their high vantage point. The trick there was moving quickly and strategically enough to avoid their arrows, which would also destroy the box itself. Later on we got to navigate a treacherous room laden with a variety of swift moving, crisscrossing saws. After that we threw a couple of levers and inserted a shield into the "insert shield here to unlock door" slot every evil palace comes with. Puzzling was all fine and dandy, but the combat...oh, the combat is what will make God of War one to watch and buy and love.

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Kratos comes with an unprecedented number of attacks. His standard weapons are chained blades that more than handle any reasonably ranged and close quartered encounter. With these he can furiously slash and hack through hordes of villainous zealots and the undead. But, by combining his basic assaults with jumps, charged attacks, hit modifiers, dashes, and grapples, Kratos can do some pretty amazing things...

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Four men surround Kratos. Hold down triangle and release to launch one in the air. As soon as he leaves the ground, jump and meet him mid-air with a flurry of standard attacks and then segue into a charged spin. The spin keeps the enemy hovering just long enough for Kratos to grapple him and punch him in the face all the way back to Earth. Right when feet meet soil, dash into another enemy and extend the life of the combo chain.

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The benefits of pulling off big combos, which can eventually reach over 100 hits, include added revenue that's used to upgrade Kratos' many attributes, and a berserker rage mode that instills our warrior with super strength and defense. Since it's not particularly difficult to pull these grand strings of moves off, you'll be enjoying the benefits sooner, rather than later.

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God of War's control is remarkably responsive and intuitive. It's a game of consideration. It's considerate that the block button will work at all times, regardless of which direction Kratos is facing in relation to his opponent. It's considerate that the Soul Calibur inspired parrying system is far more forgiving than that game. It's considerate that Kratos can parry just about any enemy. It's considerate that his attacks work even when he's climbing or dangling. It's considerate that there a variety of circular attacks and it's considerate that there are an abundance of upgradeable magics. It's just considerate.

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All told, God of War will boast four magic types (Medusa Head, Poseidon's Rage, Zeus' Bolt, and one other), five levels of chain blade upgrades, and an undisclosed number of weapons. The beautiful part is that each and every action in the game is completely independent of every other action. This means a player can conceivably string link just about anything to just about anything else. This makes for some very compelling combat that provides a seemingly inexhaustible supply of attacks.

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All of Kratos' major abilities can also be upgraded depending on how you opt to spend your red orbs (a kind of currency collected from fallen foes). Let's say you upgrade the Rage of Gods. This lets you maintain the berserker rage mode longer and do more damage during it. That's a powerful upgrade, but it only lasts a certain amount of time. You could instead opt to focus on upgrading the blades, which are ever-present, but perhaps not as powerful of an upgrade as Poseidon's Rage -- the magical electrical field that screws everyone over. If you're indecisive, you could just become the Jack of All Trades, but the master of none. It's a little bit of RPG, you see.

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Regardless of what Kratos focuses on, the game still offers some truly brutal combat. Kratos pulls the wings off harpies, stabs a minotaur through the mouth, rips the head from a medusa, crushes an undead soldier's face with his fists, tears a zombie clean in half, and heaves the head of a Hydra down upon a cracked mast so that the giant broken stick stabs the creature through the top of the mouth and straight out the eye. And that's just from an hour of play!

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There are actually lots of visceral monster fights. We're not sure exactly how many of the sub levels of the six game worlds provide memorable moments like the hydra battle, but we do know that there will be some very unique encounters. Take Cerberus, who vomits up puppies Kratos has to chuck back at him less they mutate into something much worse.

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A lot of the boss battles also feature involving combinations of gameplay. When Kratos fought the Hydra he had to manually chop away at two smaller heads before climbing up a large rope net to combat the largest commanding head. The problem was that the two smaller Hydra heads constantly recovered from basic attacks. Kratos eventually had to pin their faces to the floor with massive steal spikes before he made his way up to the main Hydra. That first part of this scenario was all dynamic.

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The second part of the epic Hydra battle more closely resembles a patterned boss fight from yesteryear. Once Kratos stood toe-to-toe with the daddy hydra, he had to repeatedly dodge forward lunges while peppering the beasts' face with a series of blows. After the hydra was sufficiently weakened, Kratos could latch onto him with his chained blades and whip his face around.

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The third portion of the boss fight is very similar to a rhythmic mini-game. Once the hydra got stuck, a series of random keys and analog stick movements would start to pop onto the screen. Doing it all correctly would cause a series of dramatic scenes to play out. They'd eventually lead to Kratos's victory. Many of God of War's most exciting battles include this combination of dynamic combat, patterned combat, and rhythmic action. This makes for some very engaging play.

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We've managed to procure a small video and some new screenshots that highlight chunks of the game, but you'll just have to keep visiting for more information leading up to God of War's scheduled March release.

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ESPN, Sony hit the slopes

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Sony Computer Entertainment America will sponsor the ninth annual ESPN Winter X Games, held January 29 to February 1 in Aspen, Colorado. This is SCEA's third time supporting the event, in which athletes will compete on skis, snowboards, and more on the slopes of Buttermilk Mountain. About 16 hours of live competition will air on ESPN and ABC. Off the slopes and on the PlayStation 2, Sony will preview God of War and let attendees play new games like ATV Offroad Fury, Killzone, Ratchet & Clank: Up Your Arsenal, and Jak 3. For more on the event, visit the Web site.

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God of Voices

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Without solid acting, a good story isn't worth a barrel of starfish in the middle of the Sahara or a monkey tied to the back of a Volvo doing 75. Without a right and proper collection of professionals to make the imaginative lines of our favorite games come alive, we'd be left with tales that struggled with television's Nightman for the title of worst thing ever made.,

God of War, good little game that it is, comes complete with a cast of notable videogame mainstays who have lent their talents to countless AAA titles in the past. From gods to killers to everything in between, God of War offers a balanced and varied selection of contributors. Thanks to our final box copy, we can now provide you with all of their names and roles.

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The cast looks something like:

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  • Claudia Black -- Artemis
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  • Susanne Blakeslee -- Oracle of Athens, Village Oracle
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  • Steve Blum -- Ares
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  • TC Carson -- Kratos
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  • Paul Eiding -- Gravedigger, Zeus, Greek Soldier
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  • Keith Ferguson -- Boat Captain, Greek Soldier
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  • Linda Hunt -- Narrator
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  • Nolan North -- Hades, Greek Soldier, Fisherman
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  • Rob Paulson -- Greek Soldier
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  • Carole Ruggier -- Athena, Aphrodite
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  • Fred Tatasciore -- Poseidon, Greek Soldier, Fisherman
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  • Christopher Smith -- Undead Soldier, Greek Soldier
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  • Courtenay Taylor -- Twins
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  • Gwendoline Yeo -- Wife, Town Square Woman
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That'll do it. Be sure to check back with us in a couple of days for the complete review of God of War. If you're impatient and would like the abridged version right now... "It's really, really damn good."

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©2005, IGN Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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God of War Commands Retail

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Sony today sends God of War to retailers across the country, which may or may not spark a rabid craze for The Iliad, though it will assuredly drop some genuinely great action onto gamers' laps. God of War takes its inspiration from ancient Greek mythology and boasts a heavy emphasis on exploration and battle strategy. Players take the role of an ex-Spartan warrior named Kratos and embark on a merciless quest to destroy Ares, the God of War. The game features a smooth and sophisticated combat system and upgradable magic attacks, as well as some puzzle-solving to complete the experience. Want more? We've got plenty on the title, including our full review. Check it out.

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©2005, IGN Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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God of War descends on the PS2

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Sony Computer Entertainment America today announced the release of God of War, the highly anticipated game from the studio that brought to market the Twisted Metal series. The action game was developed by SCEA's Santa Monica studios and is now available exclusively for the PlayStation 2.

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God of War is a single-player game set in the realm of Greek mythology. As Kratos, a rugged ex-Spartan with a grudge the size of Mount Olympus, gamers will be charged by the gods with taking down Ares, the rebellious god of war. However, to take down the renegade god, he must acquire the legendary Pandora's box.

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Along the way, Kratos will battle all sorts of mythical beasts straight from Clash of the Titans, including minotaurs, medusas, and cyclopes. Luckily, Kratos isn't any slouch and is outfitted with the "blades of chaos," double-chained blades attached to his forearms. The grotesque combat is complemented by copious amounts of blood, over-the-top unique combat maneuvers, and spectacular death animations.

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Kratos doth not kill with blade alone. On his adventures, the surly hero will meet with the many gods of Olympus, who will endow him with various powers. For example, Zeus will grant Kratos the power to throw lightning bolts, while Hades, god of the netherworld, will give him the ability to summon tortured souls from the underworld.

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God of War is rated "M" for Mature and has an SRP of $49.99. For more information on the game, head over to GameSpot's stellar full review.

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  • Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Lombax Warrior
Registered: 11/10/2008
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Re: ~God of War Information Thread~ (Carried over from the PS Forums)

Mar 21, 2010

You can't just take someone else's thread if they didn't give u permission. It might have took them forever to find all of those details.

No kudos for you. You didn't do anything extra, just copy and paste.

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: ~God of War Information Thread~ (Carried over from the PS Forums)

Mar 25, 2010

Ah, but sharing is caring.

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Treasure Hunter
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Re: ~God of War Information Thread~ (Carried over from the PS Forums)

May 4, 2010

 

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,Nick-30 wrote:
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You can't just take someone else's thread if they didn't give u permission. It might have took them forever to find all of those details.

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No kudos for you. You didn't do anything extra, just copy and paste.

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It was originally posted on PlayStation.com by MaGeeK-mAn.  The same person who reposted it here. 

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Thanks MaGeeK-mAn for carrying over your information topic. 


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